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  • 51. Baloch, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Gilenstam, Gunnar
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    The relationships of Odontotrema (Odontotremataceae) and the resurrected Sphaeropezia (Stictidaceae) - new combinations and three new Sphaeropezia species.2013In: Mycologia, ISSN 0027-5514, E-ISSN 1557-2536, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 384-397Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52. Baloch, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Lumbsch, H. Thorsten
    Lücking, Robert
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    New combinations and names in Gyalecta for former Belonia and Pachyphiale (Ascomycota, Ostropales) species2013In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 723-727Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Barani-Beiranvand, Hossein
    et al.
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Khorasan E Razavi, Mashhad, Iran..
    Aliabadian, Mansour
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Khorasan E Razavi, Mashhad, Iran.;Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Inst Appl Zool, RDZI, Mashhad, Iran..
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bioinformat & Genet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Qu, Yanhua
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Darvish, Jamshid
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Khorasan E Razavi, Mashhad, Iran.;Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Inst Appl Zool, Res Dept Rodentol, Mashhad, Iran..
    Szekely, Tamas
    Univ Bath, Dept Biol & Biochem, Bath, Avon, England..
    van Dijk, Rene E.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Anim & Plant Sci, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Zool, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Phylogeny of penduline tits inferred from mitochondrial and microsatellite genotyping2017In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 932-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Penduline tits (Remiz spp.) are renowned for their diverse mating and parenting strategies, and are a well-studied system by behavioural ecologists. However, the phylogenetic relationships and species delimitations within this genus are poorly understood. Here, we investigate phylogenetic relationships within the genus Remiz by examining the genetic variation in the mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene of 64 individuals and in ten autosomal microsatellite markers from 44 individuals. The taxon sampling includes individuals from all currently recognized species (R. pendulinus, R. macronyx, R. coronatus, and R. consobrinus) and most subspecies in the Palearctic region. We showed that R. coronatus and R. consobrinus are genetically well differentiated and constitute independent evolutionary lineages, separated from each other and from R. pendulinus/macronyx. However, we found no evidence for significant differentiation among R. pendulinus/macronyx individuals in mtDNA haplotypes and only marginal differences between R. pendulinus and R. macronyx in microsatellite markers. Hence, based on present data our recommendation is to treat R. pendulinus and R. macronyx as conspecific and R. coronatus and R. consobrinus as separate species.

  • 54.
    Barboutis, Christos
    et al.
    Natural History Museum of Crete, University of Crete, Iraklion, Greece.
    Henshaw, Ian
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Nikolopoulou, Stamatina
    Institute of Marine Biology and Genetics, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Iraklion, Crete,.
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Fuelling in front of the barrier — are there age based behavioral differences in Garden Warblers Sylvia borin?2014In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Garden Warblers Sylvia borin were studied during autumn stopover in Crete before

    crossing the barrier of theMediterranean Sea and the Sahara Desert. Birds followed

    with transmitters show extensive stopover periods, which were longer in first-year

    birds, 16 days, compared with adult birds, 14 days. The distribution of body masses

    frombirds trapped in fig trees were used to estimate the departure body mass and the

    results found indicate that both age categories on average depart with a fuel load close

    to 100% of lean body mass. The movement of transmitter birds shows di

    fferences between

    first-year and adult birds. Adult birds move further away from the release site

    and many also left the study area. Several were found settled outside the study area,

    up to 17 km away, indicating that they regularly make longer stopover movements. It

    is suggested that this might be a result of that they return to a place where they stayed

    during an earlier migration. It was shown that stopover site fidelity exists and nine

    garden warblers were recaptured in the area during a following autumn. The results

    found highlights the importance of stopover areas close to the SaharaDesert.

  • 55. Barboutis, Christos
    et al.
    Larsson, Leo
    Steinholtz, Åsa
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    From Mediterranean to Scandinavia – timing and body mass condition in four long distance migrants2015In: Ornis Svecica, ISSN 1102-6812, Vol. 25, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spring, long-distance migrants are considered to adopta time-minimizing strategy to promote early arrival atbreeding sites. The phenology of spring migration wasexamined and compared between two insular stopoversites in Greece and Sweden for Icterine Warbler, WoodWarbler, Spotted Flycatcher and Collared Flycatcher. All  of them migrate due north which means that some proportion of birds that pass through Greece are headingto Scandinavia. The Collared Flycatcher had the earliestand the Icterine Warbler the latest arrival time. Thedifferences in median dates between Greece and Swedenwere 3–4 weeks and the passages in Sweden weregenerally more condensed in time. The average overallspeed estimates were very similar and varied between129 and 137 km/d. In most of the species higher speedestimates were associated with years when birds arrivedlate in Greece. After crossing continental Europe birdsarrive at the Swedish study site with significantly higherbody masses compared to when they arrive in Greece andthis might indicate a preparation for arriving at breedinggrounds with some overload.

  • 56. Barlow, Axel
    et al.
    Cahill, James A.
    Hartmann, Stefanie
    Theunert, Christoph
    Xenikoudakis, Georgios
    Fortes, Gloria G.
    Paijmans, Johanna L. A.
    Rabeder, Gernot
    Frischauf, Christine
    Grandal-d'Anglade, Aurora
    Garcia-Vazquez, Ana
    Murtskhvaladze, Marine
    Saarma, Urmas
    Anijalg, Peeter
    Skrbinsek, Tomaz
    Bertorelle, Giorgio
    Gasparian, Boris
    Bar-Oz, Guy
    Pinhasi, Ron
    Slatkin, Montgomery
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Shapiro, Beth
    Hofreiter, Michael
    Partial genomic survival of cave bears in living brown bears2018In: Nature Ecology & Evolution, E-ISSN 2397-334X, Vol. 2, no 10, p. 1563-1570Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Barnes, Christopher
    et al.
    Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland.
    Jarosław, Majka
    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Schneider, David
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
    Walczak, Katarzyna
    Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland.
    Bukała, Michał
    Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland.
    Kośmińska, Karolina
    Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland.
    Tokarski, Tomasz
    Academic Center for Materials and NanotechnologyAGH University of Science and TechnologyKrakówPoland.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    High-spatial resolution dating of monazite and zircon reveals the timing of subduction–exhumation of the Vaimok Lens in the SeveNappe Complex (Scandinavian Caledonides)2019In: Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, ISSN 0010-7999, E-ISSN 1432-0967, Vol. 174, no 1, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In-situ monazite Th–U–total Pb dating and zircon LA–ICP–MS depth-profiling was applied to metasedimentary rocks from the Vaimok Lens in the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC), Scandinavian Caledonides. Results of monazite Th–U–total Pb dating, coupled with major and trace element mapping of monazite, revealed 603 ± 16 Ma Neoproterozoic cores surrounded byrims that formed at 498 ± 10 Ma. Monazite rim formation was facilitated via dissolution–reprecipitation of Neoproterozoic monazite. The monazite rims record garnet growth as they are depleted in Y2O3 with respect to the Neoproterozoic cores. Rims are also characterized by relatively high SrO with respect to the cores. Results of the zircon depth-profiling revealed igneous zircon cores with crystallization ages typical for SNC metasediments. Multiple zircon grains also exhibit rims formedby dissolution–reprecipitation that are defined by enrichment of light rare earth elements, U, Th, P, ± Y, and ± Sr. Rims also have subdued Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* ≈ 0.6–1.2) with respect to the cores. The age of zircon rim formation was calculated from three metasedimentary rocks: 480 ± 22 Ma; 475 ± 26 Ma; and 479 ± 38 Ma. These results show that both monazite and zircon experienced dissolution–reprecipitation under high-pressure conditions. Caledonian monazite formed coeval with garnet growth during subduction of the Vaimok Lens, whereas zircon rim formation coincided with monazite breakdown to apatite, allanite and clinozoisite during initial exhumation.

  • 58. Bartsch, Hans
    et al.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Dyster svävfluga åter i farten i Dalarna2007In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 50-54Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Villa occulata was found in a bog in the province of Dalarna, Sweden in 2005 and 2006. Extended search for the species in 2007 showed it to be regularly present in similar mires in the same area. This indicates that the species is resident in Sweden and opens the possibility for further studies of its poorly known distribution and biology. The species seems to be confined to bogs which may explain why it has gone largely unnoticed. The paper summarizes the present state of knowledge.

  • 59. Barão, Lúcia
    et al.
    Vandevenne, Floor
    Clymans, Wim
    Frings, Patrick J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Ragueneau, Olivier
    Meire, Patrick
    Conley, Daniel J.
    Struyf, Eric
    Alkaline-extractable silicon from land to ocean: A challenge for biogenic silicon determination2015In: Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, ISSN 1541-5856, E-ISSN 1541-5856, p. n/a-n/aArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biogeochemical cycling of silicon (Si) along the land-to-ocean continuum is studied by a variety of research fields and for a variety of scientific reasons. However, there is an increasing need to refine the methodology and the underlying assumptions used to determine biogenic silica (BSi) concentrations. Recent evidence suggests that contributions of nonbiogenic sources of Si dissolving during alkaline extractions, not corrected by standard silicate mineral dissolution correction protocols, can be substantial. The ratio between dissolved Si and aluminum (Al) monitored continuously during the alkaline extraction can be used to infer the origin of the Si fractions present. In this study, we applied both a continuous analysis method (0.5 M NaOH) and a traditional 0.1 M Na2CO3 extraction to a wide array of samples: (1) terrestrial vegetation, (2) soils from forest, cropland and pasture, (3) lake sediments, (4) suspended particulate matter and sediments from rivers, (5) sediments from estuaries and salt marshes and (6) ocean sediments. Our results indicate that the 0.1 M Na2CO3 extraction protocol can overestimate the BSi content, by simultaneously dissolving Si fractions of nonbiogenic origin that may represent up to 100% of the Si traditionally considered as biogenic, hampering interpretation especially in some deeper soil horizons, rivers and coastal oceanic sediments. Moreover, although the term amorphous Si was coined to reflect a growing awareness of nonbiogenic phases we show it is actually inappropriate in samples where silicate minerals may account for a large part of the extracted Si even after linear mineral correction.

  • 60. Batalha-Filho, Henrique
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Silveira, Luis F
    Miyaki, Cristina Y
    Molecular systematics and evolution of the Synallaxis ruficapilla complex (Aves: Furnariidae) in the Atlantic Forest.2013In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 86-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neotropical Synallaxis ruficapilla complex is endemic to the Atlantic Forest and is comprised of three species: S. ruficapilla, S. whitneyi, and S. infuscata. This group is closely related to the Synallaxis moesta complex that occurs in the Andes, Tepuis, and Guianan shield. Here we used mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences to infer the phylogeny and the time of diversification of the S. ruficapilla and S. moesta complexes. We also included samples of an undescribed population of Synallaxis that resembles other populations of the S. ruficapilla complex. Our results showed that different geographical lineages within the S. ruficapilla complex are reciprocally monophyletic, but the northern form (S. infuscata) grouped with an Andean taxon. This suggests that at least two lineages of this group independently colonized the Atlantic Forest. Specimens of the undescribed population formed a monophyletic clade with deep divergence. Estimated diversification dates were within the late Pliocene to Pleistocene (2.75-0.16 million of years ago). This suggests that at this time there was a higher connectivity between habitats in the rugged landscapes of the circum-Amazonian bioregions. The observed Pleistocene diversification within the Atlantic Forest is congruent in space and time with studies of other co-distributed organisms, and may be associated with climate changes and tectonic activity during this period.

  • 61. Batalha-Filho, Henrique
    et al.
    Pessoa, Rodrigo O
    Fabre, Pierre-Henri
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Silveira, Luís F
    Miyaki, Cristina Y
    Phylogeny and historical biogeography of gnateaters (Passeriformes, Conopophagidae) in the South America forests.2014In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 79, p. 422-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We inferred the phylogenetic relationships, divergence time and biogeography of Conopophagidae (gnateaters) based on sequence data of mitochondrial genes (ND2, ND3 and cytb) and nuclear introns (TGFB2 and G3PDH) from 45 tissue samples (43 Conopophaga and 2 Pittasoma) representing all currently recognized species of the family and the majority of subspecies. Phylogenetic relationships were estimated by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. Divergence time estimates were obtained based on a Bayesian relaxed clock model. These chronograms were used to calculate diversification rates and reconstruct ancestral areas of the genus Conopophaga. The phylogenetic analyses support the reciprocal monophyly of the two genera, Conopophaga and Pittasoma. All species were monophyletic with the exception of C. lineata, as C. lineata cearae did not cluster with the other two C. lineata subspecies. Divergence time estimates for Conopophagidae suggested that diversification took place during the Neogene, and that the diversification rate within Conopophaga clade was highest in the late Miocene, followed by a slower diversification rate, suggesting a diversity-dependent pattern. Our analyses of the diversification of family Conopophagidae provided a scenario for evolution in Terra Firme forest across tropical South America. The spatio-temporal pattern suggests that Conopophaga originated in the Brazilian Shield and that a complex sequence of events possibly related to the Andean uplift and infilling of former sedimentation basins and erosion cycles shaped the current distribution and diversity of this genus.

  • 62.
    Bauer, Harald
    et al.
    Landesverein für Höhlenkunde in Wien und Niederösterreich.
    Exel, Thomas
    Landesverein für Höhlenkunde in Wien und Niederösterreich.
    Oberender, Pauline
    Naturhistorisches Museum Karst und Höhlenkundliche Arbeitsgemeinschaft.
    Sjöberg, Rabbe
    P&G Group.
    Lundberg, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Scheuerer, Manuela
    Die Gobholo-Höhle in Swasiland: Expedition in eine der längsten Granithöhlen der Welt2015In: Die Höhlen, ISSN 0018-3091, Vol. 66, no 1-4, p. 27-42Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A small part of the Gobholo cave in westernSwaziland (southern Africa) has been usedfor touristic adventure tours for a few years,but the cave has never been surveyed norinvestigated scientifically. An internationalteam of speleologists started exploring, surveyingand documenting the cave in early2014. So far, more than 1 km has been surveyed,making Gobholo cave one of theworld’s longest granite caves and severalcontinuations are still unexplored. The upperparts of the cave are located in a rockfalldeposit overlying the Gobholo river, whereasthe lower parts originated from in-situweathering of the archaic alkali feldspargranite. The river floods large parts of thecave during heavy rainfalls and is responsiblefor the partial removal of the weatheringmaterial out of the cave. Manifold and numerousflowstones (composed of opal-Aand pigotite) probably formed via microbialprocesses. The cave is also a habitat for variousanimal species, including bats, spidersand cave crickets. Archaeologic artefactsprobably dating back to the local Stone Ageand Iron Age bear evidence of a former culturaluse of the cave. A thermal spring wasfound and temperature, CO2 and radonmeasurements provide data about the caveclimate which is characterised by fairly goodventilation. The age of the cave is uncertainbut the only approximately dated archaeologicalartefacts suggest a minimum age of40,000 years.

  • 63.
    Beimforde, Christina
    et al.
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Feldberg, Kathrin
    Systematic Botany and Mycology, Faculty of Biology, University of Munich (LMU), Menzinger Str. 67, 80638 Munich, Germany.
    Nylinder, Nylinder
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Rikkinen, Jouko
    Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Tuovila, Hanna
    Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Dörfelt, Heinrich
    Microbial Communication, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Neugasse 25, 07743 Jena, Germany.
    Gube, Matthias
    Microbial Communication, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Neugasse 25, 07743 Jena, Germany.
    Jackson, Daniel
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Reitner, Joachim
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Seyfullah, Leyla
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Schmidt, Alexander
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Estimating the Phanerozoic history of the Ascomycota lineages: Combining fossil and molecular data2014In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, no 78, p. 386-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylum Ascomycota is by far the largest group in the fungal kingdom. Ecologically important mutualisticassociations such as mycorrhizae and lichens have evolved in this group, which are regarded as keyinnovations that supported the evolution of land plants. Only a few attempts have been made to date theorigin of Ascomycota lineages by using molecular clock methods, which is primarily due to the lack ofsatisfactory fossil calibration data. For this reason we have evaluated all of the oldest available ascomycetefossils from amber (Albian to Miocene) and chert (Devonian and Maastrichtian). The fossils representfive major ascomycete classes (Coniocybomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Laboulbeniomycetes,and Lecanoromycetes). We have assembled a multi-gene data set (18SrDNA, 28SrDNA, RPB1 andRPB2) from a total of 145 taxa representing most groups of the Ascomycota and utilized fossil calibrationpoints solely from within the ascomycetes to estimate divergence times of Ascomycota lineages with aBayesian approach. Our results suggest an initial diversification of the Pezizomycotina in the Ordovician,followed by repeated splits of lineages throughout the Phanerozoic, and indicate that this continuousdiversification was unaffected by mass extinctions. We suggest that the ecological diversity within eachlineage ensured that at least some taxa of each group were able to survive global crises and rapidlyrecovered.

  • 64.
    Bellucci, Jeremy
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Pb Isotopic Composition of Panamanian Colonial Majolica by LA-ICP-MS2016In: Recent Advances in Laser Ablation ICP-MS for Archaeology / [ed] L. Dussubieux, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Panama ́ Viejo, founded in 1519 by the Spanish explorer Pedrarias Da ́vila, was the first permanent European settlement on the Pacific Ocean, and became a city, by royal decree, in 1521. Shortly after its creation, the city became an important base for trade with Spain. In 1671, the English pirate Henry Morgan waged an attack on Panama ́ Viejo, which resulted in a fire that destroyed the entire city. A new settlement built a few miles west, called Casco Antiguo or San Felipe, is now the historic district of modern Panama City. The Pb isotopic compositions of the glazes on the surface of sixteenth to seventeenth century majolica pottery sherds from Panama Viejo and Casco Antiguo (both in Panama), and Lima (Peru) were determined via non-destructive laser ablation multi-collector ICP-MS (LA-MC-ICP-MS). The contrast in Pb isotopic compositions in the glazes on ceramics recovered in different locations demonstrate that early majolica pottery production during this period used Pb obtained from the Andes. However, the Pb used in later majolica production in Panama is of Spanish origin. After Panama ́ Viejo was burned to the ground, Panamanian majolica production ended.

  • 65. Bellucci, Jeremy
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Humayan, M
    Hewins, R
    Zanda, B
    Pb-isotopic evidence for an early, enriched crust on Mars2015In: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, ISSN 0012-821X, E-ISSN 1385-013X, Vol. 410, p. 34-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Martian meteorite NWA 7533 is a regolith breccia that compositionally resembles the Martian surface measured by orbiters and landers. NWA 7533 contains monzonitic clasts that have zircon with U–Pb ages of 4.428 Ga. The Pb isotopic compositions of plagioclase and alkali feldspars, as well as U–Pb isotopic compositions of chlorapatitein the monzonitic clasts of NWA 7533 have been measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). The U–Pb isotopic compositions measured from the chlorapatitein NWA 7533 yield an age of 1.357 ±81Ga(2σ). The least radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions measured in plagioclase and K-feldspar lie within error of the 4.428 Ga Geochron. These data indicate that the monzonitic clasts in NWA 7533 are a product of a differentiation history that includes residence in areservoir that formed prior to 4.428 Ga with a μ-value (238U/204Pb) of at least 13.4 ±1.7 (2σ)and aκ-value (232Th/238U) of ∼4.3. This μ-value is more than three times higher than any other documented Martian reservoir. These results indicate either the Martian mantle is significantly more heterogeneous than previously thought (μ-value of 1–14 vs. 1–5) and/or the monzonitic clasts formed by the melting of Martian crust with a μ-value of at least 13.4. Therefore, NWA 7533 may contain the first isotopic evidence for an enriched, differentiated crust on Mars.

  • 66.
    Bellucci, Jeremy
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Joshua, Snape
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Nemchin, Alexander
    Direct Pb Isotopic Analysis of a Nuclear Fallout Debris Particle from the Trinity Nuclear Test2017In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 89, p. 1887-1891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Pb isotope composition of a nuclear fallout debris particle has been directly measured in post-detonation materials produced during the Trinity nuclear test by a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) scanning ion image technique (SII). This technique permits the visual assessment of the spatial distribution of Pb and can be used to obtain full Pb isotope compositions in user-defined regions in a 70 μm × 70 μm analytical window. In conjunction with backscattered electron (BSE) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) mapping of the same particle, the Pb measured in this fallout particle cannot be from a major phase in the precursor arkosic sand. Similarly, the Pb isotope composition of the particle is resolvable from the surrounding glass at the 2σ uncertainty level (where σ represents the standard deviation). The Pb isotope composition measured in the particle here is in excellent agreement with that inferred from measurements of green and red trinitite, suggesting that these types of particles are responsible for the Pb isotope compositions measured in both trinitite glasses. 

  • 67.
    Bellucci, Jeremy
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Nemchin, Alexander
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Ross, Kielman
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Snape, Joshua
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Pidgeon, Robert
    Geochronology of Hadean zircon grains from the Jack Hills, Western Australia constrained by quantitative scanning ion imaging2018In: Chemical Geology, ISSN 0009-2541, E-ISSN 1872-6836, Vol. 476, p. 469-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five Hadean (> 4 Ga) aged zircon grains from the Jack Hills metasedimentary belt have been investigated by a secondary ion mass spectrometry scanning ion image technique. This technique has the ability to obtain accurate and precise full U-Pb systematics on a scale < 5 μm, as well as document the spatial distribution of U, Th and Pb. All five of the grains investigated here have complex cathodoluminescence patterns that correlate to different U, Th, and Pb concentration domains. The age determinations for these different chemical zones indicate multiple reworking events that are preserved in each grain and have affected the primary crystalized zircon on the scale of < 10 μm, smaller than conventional ion microprobe spot analyses. In comparison to the spot analyses performed on these grains, these new scanning ion images and age determinations indicate that almost half of the spot analyses have intersected several age and chemical domains in both fractured and unfractured parts of the individual crystals. Some of these unfractured, mixed domain spot analyses have concordant ages that are inaccurate. Thus, if the frequency of spot analyses intersecting mixed domains here is even close to representative of all other studies of the Jack Hills zircon population, it makes the interpretation of any trace element, Hf, or O isotopic data present in the literature tenuous. Lastly, all of the grains analysed here preserve at least two distinguishable 207Pb/206Pb ages. These ages are preserved in core-rim and/or complex internal textural relationships in unfractured domains. These secondary events took place at ca. 4.3, 4.2, 4.1, 4.0, 3.7, and 2.9 Ga, which are coincident with previously determined statistically robust age peaks present in this zircon population.

  • 68.
    Bellucci, Jeremy
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Nemchin, Alexander
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Snape, Joshua
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Bland, Phil
    Benedix, Gretchen
    Roszjar, Julia
    Pb evolution in the Martian mantle2018In: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, ISSN 0012-821X, E-ISSN 1385-013X, Vol. 485, p. 79-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The initial Pb compositions of one enriched shergottite, one intermediate shergottite, two depleted shergottites, and Nakhla have been measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). These values, in addition to data from previous studies using an identical analytical method performed on three enriched shergottites, ALH 84001, and Chassigny, are used to construct a unified and internally consistent model for the differentiation history of the Martian mantle and crystallization ages for Martian meteorites. The differentiation history of the shergottites and Nakhla/Chassigny are fundamentally different, which is in agreement with short-lived radiogenic isotope systematics. The initial Pb compositions of Nakhla/Chassigny are best explained by the late addition of a Pb-enriched component with a primitive, non-radiogenic composition. In contrast, the Pb isotopic compositions of the shergottite group indicate a relatively simple evolutionary history of the Martian mantle that can be modeled based on recent results from the Sm–Nd system. The shergottites have been linked to a single mantle differentiation event at 4504 Ma. Thus, the shergottite Pb isotopic model here reflects a two-stage history 1) pre-silicate differentiation (4504 Ma) and 2) post-silicate differentiation to the age of eruption (as determined by concordant radiogenic isochron ages). The μ-values (238U/204Pb) obtained for these two different stages of Pb growth are μ1 of 1.8 and a range of μ2 from 1.4–4.7, respectively. The μ1-value of 1.8 is in broad agreement with enstatite and ordinary chondrites and that proposed for proto Earth, suggesting this is the initial μ-value for inner Solar System bodies. When plotted against other source radiogenic isotopic variables (Sri, γ187Os, ε143Nd, and ε176Hf), the second stage mantle evolution range in observed mantle μ-values display excellent linear correlations (r2 > 0.85) and represent a spectrum of Martian mantle mixing-end members (depleted, intermediate, enriched).

  • 69.
    Bellucci, Jeremy
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Nemchin, Alexander
    Pidgeon, Robert
    Grange, Marion
    Reddy, Steven
    Timms, Nick
    A scanning ion imaging investigation into the micron-scale U-Pb systematics in a complex lunar zircon2016In: Chemical Geology, ISSN 0009-2541, E-ISSN 1872-6836, Vol. 438, p. 112-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The full U-Pb isotopic systematics in a complex lunar zircon ‘Pomegranate’ from lunar impact breccia 73235 have been investigated by the development of a novel Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) scanning ion imaging (SII) technique. This technique offers at least a four-fold increase in analytical spatial resolution over traditional SIMS analyses in zircon. Results from this study confirm the hypothesis that the Pomegranate zircon crystallized at 4.302 ± 0.013 Ga and experienced an impact that formed, U-enriched zircon around primary zircon cores at 4.184 ± 0.007 Ga (2σ, all uncertainties). The increase in spatial resolution offered by this technique has facilitated targeting of primary zircon that was previously inaccessible to conventional spot analyses. This approach has yielded results indicating that individual grains with a diffusive distance of less than ~4 μm have been reset to the young impact age, while individual grains with a diffusive distance larger than ~6 μm have retained the old crystallization age. Assuming a broad range in cooling rate of 0.5–50 °C/year, which has been observed in a suite of similar lunar breccias, a maximum localized temperature generated by the impact that reset small prima- ry zircon and created new, high-U zircon is estimated to be between 1100 and 1280 °C.

  • 70. Bellucci, Jeremy
    et al.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Nemchin, Alexander
    Regolith breccia Northwest Africa 7533: Mineralogy and petrology with implications for early Mars2016In: Meteoritics and Planetary Science, ISSN 1086-9379, E-ISSN 1945-5100, p. 1-36Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Bellucci, Jeremy
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Snape, Joshua
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Halogen and Cl isotopic systematics in Martian phosphates: Implications for the Cl cycle and surface halogen reservoirs on Mars2017In: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, ISSN 0012-821X, E-ISSN 1385-013X, Vol. 458, p. 192-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cl isotopic compositions and halogen (Cl, F, Br, and I) abundances in phosphates from eight Martian meteorites, spanning most rock types and ages currently available, have been measured in situ by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). Likewise, the distribution of halogens has been documented by x-ray mapping. Halogen concentrations range over several orders of magnitude up to some of the largest concentrations yet measured in Martian samples or on the Martian surface, and the inter-element ratios are highly variable. Similarly, Cl isotope compositions exhibit a larger range than all pristine terrestrial igneous rocks. Phosphates in ancient (>4 Ga) meteorites (orthopyroxenite ALH 84001 and breccia NWA 7533) have positive d37Cl anomalies (+1.1 to +2.5 ‰).  These samples also exhibit explicit whole rock and grain scale evidence for hydrothermal or aqueous activity. In contrast, the phosphates in the younger basaltic Shergottite meteorites (<600 Ma) have negative d37Cl anomalies (-0.2 to -5.6 ‰).  Phosphates with the largest negative d37Cl anomalies display zonation where the rims of the grains are enriched in all halogens and have significantly more negative d37Cl anomalies indicating interaction with the surface of Mars during the latest stages of basalt crystallization. The phosphates with no textural, major element, or halogen enrichment evidence for mixing with this surface reservoir have an average d37Cl of -0.6 ‰, which suggests a similar Cl isotope composition between Mars, the Earth, and the Moon. The only process known to fractionate Cl isotopes, both positively and negatively, is formation of perchlorate, which has been detected in weight percent concentrations on the Martian surface. The age range and obvious mixing history of the phosphates studied here suggest perchlorate formation and halogen cycling via brines, which have also been observed on the Martian surface, has been active throughout Martian history. 

  • 72.
    Bellucci, Jeremy
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Snape, Joshua
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Nemchin, Alexander
    A Pb isotopic resolution to the Martian meteorite age paradox2016In: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, ISSN 0012-821X, E-ISSN 1385-013X, Vol. 433, p. 241-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Bellucci, Jeremy
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Snape, Joshua
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Nemchin, Alexander
    The Pb isotopic evolution of the Martian mantle constrained by initial Pb in Martian meteorites2015In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets, ISSN 2169-9097, E-ISSN 2169-9100, Vol. 120, p. 2224-2240Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Bengtson, Annika
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Englund, Markus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Pruski, John F.
    Anderberg, Arne Alfred
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Phylogeny of the Athroismeae (Asteraceae), with a new circumscription of the tribe2017In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 408-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Athroismeae is a small tribe of the Asteraceae-Asteroideae, the members of which show considerable variation in morphology. A molecular phylogenetic study of the tribe is presented for the first time, based on plastid (ndhF, trnH-psbA, trnL-trnF) and nuclear data (ETS, ITS). The phylogenetic relationships between the different genera within Athroismeae are discussed, and in addition, three unispecific genera: Anisochaeta, Artemisiopsis and Symphyllocarpus as well as Duhaldea (Inula) stuhlmannii, all earlier placed in other tribes, are here shown to belong within Athroismeae. Symphyllocarpus is sister to Centipeda and the earlier Symphyllocarpinae includes Centipedinae in synonymy. Furthermore, Cardosoa and Philyrophyllum are found to be integrated within Anisopappus and their generic status cannot be maintained. An outline of an amended circumscription of the Athroismeae is presented, with three new combinations and a description of the new subtribe Lowryanthinae.

  • 75. Bengtson, Annika
    et al.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Karis, Per Ola
    Anderberg, Arne A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Evolution and diversification related to rainfall regimes: diversification patterns in the South African genus Metalasia (Asteraceae-Gnaphalieae).2015In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 121-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The Cape region is known for its exceptional species richness, although much remains unknown regarding the appearance of the modern Cape flora. One explanation is that floral diversification was influenced by the establishment of winter rainfall/summer arid conditions hypothesized to have occurred towards the end of the Miocene. We studied the evolution and diversification of the plant genus Metalasia (Asteraceae–Gnaphalieae), with the aim of testing whether radiation patterns may have been influenced by the climatic changes.

    Location. South Africa, with emphasis on the south-west.

    Methods. The radiation of Metalasia was investigated using two approaches: a species diffusion approach, which estimated the ancestral areas by means of a relaxed random walk while sampling from extant distributions; and a discrete approach, in which distributions were defined according to the phytogeographical centres of the Cape region. Secondarily derived clock rates from an earlier Gnaphalieae study were used for calibration purposes.

    Results. Our analyses date Metalasia to approximately 6.9 Ma, after the Miocene–Pliocene boundary and the establishment of the winter rainfall/summer arid conditions. Metalasia consists of two sister clades: Clade A and Clade B. Clade B, which is endemic to the winter rainfall area, is estimated to have diversified c. 6.4 Ma, whereas Clade A, with a main distribution in the all-year rainfall area, is considerably younger, with a crown group age estimated to 3.3 Ma. Diversification rates suggest an early rapid speciation, with rates decreasing through time both for Metalasia and for clades A and B separately. Ancestral area estimations show a possible scenario for the radiation of Metalasia to its current diversity and distribution, with no conflict between results inferred from diffusion or discrete methods.

    Main conclusions. The diversification of Metalasia is estimated to have begun after the establishment of the winter rainfall/summer arid conditions, consistent with its radiation having been influenced by changes in the climatic regime.

  • 76.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Presentation of the 2010 Charles Schuchert Award of the Paleontological Society to Philip C. J. Donoghue.2011In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Journal of Paleontology, Vol. 85, no 5, p. 1015-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    LADIES AND gentlemen, friends and colleagues, the winner of the 2010 Charles Schuchert Award is Professor Philip Donoghue of the University of Bristol. In the natural progression of our personal lives, the transition from young snot to old fart is so gradual that one tends not to recognize it, least of all in oneself. Most of us— those further along in their careers— have passed through the stage of young, promising paleontologist to become middleaged promising paleontologists. Not so Phil Donoghue. I first met him when he was a graduate student at the University of Leicester. We got into a discussion about the nature of conodonts and certain pet ideas of mine that I had published. Phil did not agree with me so he went down in my book as a young snot. Soon thereafter, he published a ground-breaking, paradigm-changing paper, together with Peter Forey and Dick Aldridge, on the phylogenetic position of conodonts. Now, I realized that it was I who was the old fart. Phil had demonstrated that he had skipped the young-and-promising stage. He was, and is, young and delivering. Most people who start working on conodonts tend to remain with them. There is something about that mouth apparatus and the way in which it grabs hold of you. But Phil quickly tore himself loose from its grip. He quickly demonstrated an unquenchable zeal in attacking central issues in evolutionary paleontology, such as the origin of microstructures in teeth, the origin of teeth in jaws, the origin of jaws in vertebrates, the origin of vertebrates among animals, the origin of animals in the biosphere, and so on. I fear he will not stop until he has solved the question of the origin of life, the universe, and everything else. The breadth of questions he has already addressed is one aspect of Phil’s work. The diversity of tools he brings to bear on them is another. There is a lot of grinding powder under his fingernails, and lots of devo in his evo. After a sabbatical at the University of Bath, where he seems to have broken every rule of the Sabbath, he came out as a full-fledged molecular biologist, with RNA libraries at his fingertips. He is at the forefront in marrying data from living organisms with that from fossil taxa in phylogenetic analyses. Recently, he came out in defense of the paraphyletic stem group with arguments such that I have high hopes for his post-Schuchert development. Yes, paraphyletic groups are much more interesting than the monophyletic dead-ends called clades, although Phil of course refuses to call them groups. When Phil and some colleagues published a paper in Nature on the Cambrian fossil embryo Markuelia (again showing me wrong on a central issue), it caught the eye of Marco Stampanoni, a physicist who works at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) synchrotron near Zu¨ rich, in Switzerland. Marco had been developing methods of X-ray microtomography, using SLS beamlines. He contacted Phil with a proposal to collaborate, and Phil contacted me. Now, our collaboration based on this revolutionary technique, with Phil at the forefront, has opened our eyes to a huge amount of information to which we did not have access only a few years ago. Taphonomy is like the weather, people speak about it, but few do anything about it. But if you neglect it, you are in deep peril. Phil is much more concerned about taphonomy than most colleagues I know, and he does something about it. He started a project with embryologist Rudy Raff to determine how bacteria go about decomposing embryos in ways such that they are upgraded to exquisite fossils. He is engaging many colleagues, post-docs and students in the investigation of these processes and their end results. As a result, we are gaining insight into how bacteria can invade, devour and faithfully replicate intracellular features, and how different populations of bacteria play different roles in the process. An intriguing observation has emerged from Phil’s taphonomic work with Mark Purnell. Taphonomic degradation tends to bring about a stemward slippage of taxa in their apparent phylogenetic relationships, on account of sequential disappearance of preserved apomorphies. The general significance of this observation has still to be tested, but its potential importance for the phylogenetic analysis of fossils is obvious. Phil is leading an amazingly diverse and successful program in paleontology at the University of Bristol, permeated by his holistic approach and addressing everything from organismbased paleontology to molecular biology. Molecular, organismic, orgiastic paleontology—that’s the realm of Phil Donoghue. Mr. President, please hand the Schuchert Award for 2010 over to Phil. He thoroughly deserves it.

  • 77.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Presentation of the 2010 Paleontological Society Medal to Bruce Runnegar.2011In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Journal of Paleontology, Vol. 85, no 5, p. 1012-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ladies and gentlemen, friends and colleagues, the 2010 Paleontological Society Medal is awarded to Professor Bruce Runnegar of the University of California at Los Angeles. Preparing for this presentation, I got hold of a list of Bruce’s invited lectures, given during the past ten years. There are 86 titles on almost as many subjects. I will mention what these presentations were about, so you can get an impression of this Renaissance mind: Carbon isotopes and ocean evolution; Precambrian–Cambrian stratigraphy; Molecular evolution and the fossil record; Ediacaran organisms; Life on Mars; Oxygen and metazoan evolution; Orbital dynamics of the Earth–Moon system; Snowball Earth; Multiplated mollusks; Mass-independent fractionation of sulfur; Biomineralization; The Cambrian Explosion; Geobiology in the Archean; Cross-calibration of geological and astronomical time scales; Origins of biological complexity; Astrobiology of the Earth; Astrobiology of everything else; The Acraman impact of the Ediacaran; Biosignatures in ancient rocks; Microbial metabolism in the Early Archean. Now, most people can waffle about almost anything. A good teacher can read up on such topics and deliver useful lectures on them to students. But, as you will know if you are the least bit familiar with Bruce’s work, these are nearly all topics in fields where he has made startlingly innovative and pioneering contributions. Some would say that his most important contributions are missing from this list, such as molecular paleobiology, for example, or—if you prefer more tangible fossils—the systematics and evolution of Cambrian and Permian mollusks. But what is represented on the list is sufficient to document several brilliant careers in science: Bruce broke new ground in understanding the biomineralization processes of early mollusks by working with natural phosphatic replicas of the now vanished crystals of various species of calcium carbonate. He published a seminal set of papers on the evolution of the earliest mollusks, together with his longtime friend John Pojeta. And, as a leader of the astrobiology movement, Bruce has not only inspired everyone to start looking at life in a universal context, he has also brought his visions to life as Director of NASA’s Astrobiology Institute. It was in this context that Bruce was formally transformed from a U.S.-based Aussie to a full-fledged Australian– American (which is, I think, the politically correct term). In reference to molecular paleontology, I have some personal recollections. Bruce and I both have backgrounds as editors of paleontological journals. Bruce founded and for several years edited the successful Australasian journal Alcheringa, which is still going strong. Some of my first interactions with Bruce occurred in the 1970s, when he submitted manuscripts to Lethaia, of which I was an editor. One of my early forays was to question the number of authors of one of these manuscripts. I knew that no less than five authors of a single paper was excessive and confronted Bruce with this. It may have been the first time I really annoyed him, as he politely told me not to forget to turn my brain on, next time I wrote to him. Well, recently I saw an article in Nature with 230 authors, at which point it finally became clear to me that Bruce was ahead of his time. But back in those times I was a wee bit miffed, so when Bruce sent me a manuscript in which he estimated geological ages of major animal lineages using molecular clock techniques, I knew I could get my revenge. I sent the paper out for review by the sharpest molecular biologists of the day, smugly expecting to receive patronizing comments about paleontologists who should stick to their snail shells rather than pretending to be real scientists. No such luck. The reviews that came in were extravagant in their praise of the paper. Published in 1982, it predated by almost 15 years the avalanche of contributions that later came out on this topic. As usual, Bruce was ahead of the pack, but when others reached the spot where he had stood 15 years earlier, he wasn’t there anymore. Discrepancies between molecular and fossil data for a while seemed insurmountable, not to mention the discrepancies between different sets of molecular data and different sorts of analyses. But Bruce had inspired a bright set of younger biologists and paleontologists to refine their calculations. When the dust settled, one of those with whom Bruce had shared his spark, Kevin Peterson, was able to show that there is no significant conflict between the dates provided by fossils and by molecules. But I mentioned molecular paleontology. In 1986, Bruce published a seminal paper with just that title. In it he expressed his credo, thus: ‘‘palaeontologists should use all available sources of information to understand the evolution of life and its effect on the planet.’’ These are not empty words; they present a formidable challenge. Like all splendid visions, they stake out a direction rather than a goal. That it is possible to pursue this vision we see from the example set by this year’s Schuchert Award winner, Phil Donoghue, who together with Kevin Peterson and Roger Summons wrote a stimulating twenty-first century follow-up to Bruce’s earlier paper. But the foremost example is Bruce Runnegar himself. Here is a taste of the way in which his productive mind works. In 1982, Bruce used the anatomy and hypothesized physiology of the Ediacaran fossil Dickinsonia to estimate constraints for ambient oxygen levels in the Ediacaran atmosphere. This paper is much cited, and geochemists are only now catching up with him, developing geochemical proxies to test the hypothesis that a rising oxygen level was a trigger for the Cambrian Explosion, or, as Bruce so aptly put it, that one ‘‘ingredient, as in most explosives, may well have been a strong oxidising agent.’’ Finally, consider another example. In 1998, Bruce published a cladistic analysis of glaciogenic sediments, testing and corroborating the hypothesis that there were only two major Neoproterozoic glaciations, a result that still seems to stand. Who but Bruce would have thought of such a preposterous idea, using cladistics to resolve a stratigraphical conundrum? Bruce Runnegar has, over the years, formed collegial bonds with many scientists. The many younger people inspired by him include Phil Donoghue, now standing on Bruce’s shoulders. Bruce himself has stood on the shoulders of other giants, as he is quick to acknowledge. But, like Sir Isaac Newton, he has no reason to be bashful about his success, and I don’t think he is. The Paleontological Society Medal was really made for Bruce Runnegar, so please, Mr. President, give it to him!

  • 78.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Collins, Desmond
    Chancelloriids of the Cambrian Burgess Shale2015In: Palaeontologia Electronica, ISSN 1935-3952, E-ISSN 1094-8074, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cactus-like chancelloriids from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale are revised on the basis of Walcott’s (1920) original collections and new material containing several hundred specimens collected by Royal Ontario Museum field expeditions from 1975 to 2000. Walcott’s interpretation of chancelloriids as sponges was based on a misinterpretation of the dermal coelosclerites as embedded sponge-type spicules, an interpretation that further led to the lumping of three distinct taxa into one species, Chancelloria eros Walcott, 1920. The other two taxa are herein separated from C. eros and described as Allonnia tintinopsis n.sp. and Archiasterella coriacea n.sp., all belonging to the Family Chancelloriidae Walcott, 1920. Chancelloriids were sedentary animals, anchored to shells or lumps of debris in the muddy bottom, or to sponges, or to other chancelloriids. They had a radially symmetrical body and an apical orifice surrounded by a palisade of modified sclerites. Well-preserved integuments in Al. tintinopsis and Ar. coriacea do not show any ostium-like openings. Neither is there any evidence for internal organs, such as a gut. Partly narrowed specimens suggest that the body periodically contracted from the attached end to expel waste material from the body cavity. Chancelloriids were close in organization to cnidarians but shared the character of coelosclerites with the bilaterian halkieriids and siphogonuchitids. The taxon Coeloscleritophora is most likely paraphyletic.

  • 79.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Cunningham, John A.
    Yin, Chongyu
    Donoghue, Philip C.J.
    University of Bristol.
    A merciful death for the “earliest bilaterian,” Vernanimalcula.2012In: Evolution and Development, ISSN 1520-541x, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 421-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fossils described as Vernanimalcula guizhouena, from the nearly 600 million-year-old Doushantuo Formation in South China, have been interpreted as the remains of bilaterian animals. As such they would represent the oldest putative record of bilaterian animals in Earth history, and they have been invoked in debate over this formative episode of early animal evolution. However, this interpretation is fallacious. We review the evidential basis of the biological interpretation of Vernanimalcula, concluding that the structures key to animal identity are effects of mineralization that do not represent biological tissues, and, furthermore, that it is not possible to derive its anatomical reconstruction on the basis of the available evidence. There is no evidential basis for interpreting Vernanimalcula as an animal, let alone a bilaterian. The conclusions of evolutionary studies that have relied upon the bilaterian interpretation of Vernanimalcula must be called into question.

  • 80. Bengtson, Stefan
    et al.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    Fungal-prokaryotic symbiosis in the deep biosphere2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Astolfo, Alberto
    Paul Scherrer Institute.
    Belivanova, Veneta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Broman, Curt
    Stockholm University.
    Marone, Federica
    Paul Scherrer Institute.
    Stampanoni, Marco
    ETH Zürich.
    Deep-biosphere consortium of fungi and prokaryotes in Eocene sub-seafloor basalts.2014In: Geobiology, ISSN 1472-4677, E-ISSN 1472-4669, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 489-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor crust is believed to contain a significant part of Earth’s biomass, but because of the difficulties of directly observing the living organisms, its composition and ecology are poorly known. We report here a consortium of fossilized prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms, occupying cavities in deep-drilled vesicular basalt from the Emperor Seamounts, Pacific Ocean, 67.5 meters below seafloor (mbsf). Fungal hyphae provide the framework on which prokaryote-like organisms are suspended like cobwebs and iron-oxidizing bacteria form microstromatolites (Frutexites). The spatial interrelationships show that the organisms were living at the same time in an integrated fashion, suggesting symbiotic interdependence. The community is contemporaneous with secondary mineralizations of calcite partly filling the cavities. The fungal hyphae frequently extend into the calcite, indicating that they were able to bore into the substrate through mineral dissolution. A symbiotic relationship with chemoautotrophs, as inferred for the observed consortium, may be a prerequisite for the eukaryotic colonization of crustal rocks. Fossils thus open a window to the extant as well as the ancient deep biosphere.

  • 82.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Rasmussen, Birger
    Curtin University.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Muhling, Janet
    Curtin University.
    Broman, Curt
    Stockholm University.
    Marone, Federica
    Stampanoni, Marco
    Bekker, Andrey
    University of California Riverside.
    Fungus-like mycelial fossils in 2.4-billion-year-old vesicular basalt.2017In: Nature Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 2397-334X, Vol. 1, no 6, p. 1-6, article id 0141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fungi have recently been found to comprise a significant part of the deep biosphere in oceanic sediments and crustal rocks. Fossils occupying fractures and pores in Phanerozoic volcanics indicate that this habitat is at least 400 million years old, but its origin may be considerably older. A 2.4-billion-year-old basalt from the Palaeoproterozoic Ongeluk Formation in South Africa contains filamentous fossils in vesicles and fractures. The filaments form mycelium-like structures growing from a basal film attached to the internal rock surfaces. Filaments branch and anastomose, touch and entangle each other. They are indistinguishable from mycelial fossils found in similar deep-biosphere habitats in the Phanerozoic, where they are attributed to fungi on the basis of chemical and morphological similarities to living fungi. The Ongeluk fossils, however, are two to three times older than current age estimates of the fungal clade. Unless they represent an unknown branch of fungus-like organisms, the fossils imply that the fungal clade is considerably older than previously thought, and that fungal origin and early evolution may lie in the oceanic deep biosphere rather than on land. The Ongeluk discovery suggests that life has inhabited submarine volcanics for more than 2.4 billion years.

  • 83.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Sallstedt, Therese
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Belivanova, Veneta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Three-dimensional preservation of cellular and subcellular structures suggests 1.6 billion-year-old crown-group red algae2017In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 1-38, article id e2000735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ~1.6 Ga Tirohan Dolomite of the Lower Vindhyan in central India contains phosphatized stromatolitic microbialites. We report from there uniquely well-preserved fossils interpreted as probable crown-group rhodophytes (red algae). The filamentous form Rafatazmia chitrakootensis n. gen, n. sp. has uniserial rows of large cells and grows through diffusely distributed septation. Each cell has a centrally suspended, conspicuous rhomboidal disk interpreted as a pyrenoid. The septa between the cells have central structures that may represent pit connections and pit plugs. Another filamentous form, Denaricion mendax n. gen., n. sp., has coin-like cells reminiscent of those in large sulfur-oxidizing bacteria but much more recalcitrant than the liquid-vacuole-filled cells of the latter. There are also resemblances with oscillatoriacean cyanobacteria, although cell volumes in the latter are much smaller. The wider affinities of Denaricion are uncertain. Ramathallus lobatus n. gen., n. sp. is a lobate sessile alga with pseudoparenchymatous thallus, “cell fountains,” and apical growth, suggesting florideophycean affinity. If these inferences are correct, Rafatazmia and Ramathallus represent crown-group multicellular rhodophytes, antedating the oldest previously accepted red alga in the fossil record by about 400 million years.

  • 84. Bennike, Ole
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lemdahl, Geoffrey
    Wiberg-Larsen, Peter
    A multiproxy macrofossil record of Eemian palaeoenvironments from Klaksvík, the Faroe Islands2018In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, Vol. 47, p. 106-113Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 85. Bennike, Ole
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    High, Kirsty
    Korshöj, Joakim S.
    Lemdahl, Geoffrey
    Penkman, Kirsty
    Preece, Richard C.
    Rosenlund, Knud
    Viehlberg, Finn A.
    New interglacial deposits from Copenhagen, Denmark:marine Isotope Stage 72018In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, Vol. 48, p. 107-118Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Bercovici, Antoine
    et al.
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 12, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden.
    Cui, Ying
    Department of Geosciences, 512 Deike Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.
    Forel, Marie-Béatrice
    State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology of Ministry of Education, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, People’s Republic of China.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Terrestrial paleoenvironment characterization across the Permian–Triassic boundary in South China2015In: Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, ISSN 1367-9120, Vol. 98, p. 225-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Well-preserved marine fossils in carbonate rocks permit detailed studies of the end-Permian extinction event in the marine realm. However, the rarity of fossils in terrestrial depositional environments makes it more challenging to attain a satisfactory degree of resolution to describe the biotic turnover on land. Here we present new sedimentological, paleontological and geochemical (X-ray fluorescence) analysis from the study of four terrestrial sections (Chahe, Zhejue, Mide and Jiucaichong) in Western Guizhou and Eastern Yunnan (Yangtze Platform, South China) to evaluate paleoenvironmental changes through the Permian–Triassic transition.

    Our results show major differences in the depositional environments between the Permian Xuanwei and the Triassic Kayitou formations with a change from fluvial–lacustrine to coastal marine settings. This change is associated with a drastic modification of the preservation mode of the fossil plants, from large compressions to small comminuted debris. Plant fossils spanning the Permian–Triassic boundary show the existence of two distinct assemblages: In the Xuanwei Formation, a Late Permian (Changhsingian) assemblage with characteristic Cathaysian wetland plants (mainly Gigantopteris dictyophylloides, Gigantonoclea guizhouensis, G. nicotianaefolia, G. plumosa, G. hallei, Lobatannularia heinanensis, L. cathaysiana, L. multifolia, Annularia pingloensis, A. shirakii, Paracalamites stenocostatus, Cordaites sp.) is identified. In the lowermost Kayitou Formation, an Early Triassic (Induan)Annalepis–Peltaspermum assemblage is shown, associated with very rare, relictual gigantopterids. Palynological samples are poor, and low yield samples show assemblages almost exclusively represented by spores. A 1 m thick zone enriched in putative fungal spores was identified near the top of the Xuanwei Formation, including diverse multicellular forms, such as Reduviasporonites sp. This interval likely corresponds to the PTB ‘‘fungal spike’’ conventionally associated with land denudation and ecosystem collapse. While the floral turnover is evident, further studies based on plant diversity would be required in order to assess contribution linked to the end-Permian mass extinction versus local paleoenvironmental changes associated with the transition between the Xuanwei and Kayitou formations.

  • 87. Bergamini, Ariel
    et al.
    Studer, Lisa
    Valentini, Maya
    Jacot, Katja
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Profitieren Moose von Biodiversitätsförderflächen im Landwirtschaftsgebiet?2017In: NL-Inside, Vol. 1//17, p. 17-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 88. Bergemann, Christian A.
    et al.
    Gnos, Edwin
    Berger, Alfons
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Mullis, Josef
    Walter, Franz
    Bojar, Hans-Peter
    Constraining long-term fault activity in the brittle domain through in situ dating of hydrothermal monazite2018In: Terra Nova, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 440-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract SIMS Th–Pb dating of hydrothermal fissure-vein monazite-(Ce) has the unique potential to date multiple tectonic events under low-grade metamorphic brittle/ductile conditions over large time frames. Monazites-(Ce) from brittle fault systems in the Eastern Alps allow us to constrain their Cretaceous activity over 20 Ma within single crystals, recording all major tectonic events. Eo-Alpine formation of the fluid-filled fissure-veins occurred 90 Ma ago at 352 ± 19°C and 342 ± 42 MPa. This corresponds to peak conditions during regional metamorphism of the Cretaceous collisional nappe stacking. Several stages of dissolution–reprecipitation/recrystallization record fault activity between 84 and 70 Ma. Corresponding fluid inclusions indicate conditions of 229 ± 10°C and 143 ± 20 MPa. This correlates with the formation of sedimentary basins during post-orogenic extension associated with strike-slip movements. The results strengthen the hypothesis that many large fault systems in the Eastern Alps developed during the Cretaceous orogeny and became reactivated during Neogene Alpine tectonics.

  • 89. Bergkvist, Johanna
    et al.
    Klawonn, Isabell
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Lavik, Gaute
    Brüchert, Volker
    Ploug, Helle
    Turbulence simultaneously stimulates small- and large-scale CO2 sequestration by chain-forming diatoms in the sea2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chain-forming diatoms are key CO2-fixing organisms in the ocean. Under turbulent conditions they form fast-sinking aggregates that are exported from the upper sunlit ocean to the ocean interior. A decade-old paradigm states that primary production in chain-forming diatoms is stimulated by turbulence. Yet, direct measurements of cell-specific primary production in individual field populations of chain-forming diatoms are poorly documented. Here we measured cell-specific carbon, nitrate and ammonium assimilation in two field populations of chain-forming diatoms (Skeletonema and Chaetoceros) at low-nutrient concentrations under still conditions and turbulent shear using secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with stable isotopic tracers and compared our data with those predicted by mass transfer theory. Turbulent shear significantly increases cell-specific C assimilation compared to still conditions in the cells/chains that also form fast-sinking, aggregates rich in carbon and ammonium. Thus, turbulence simultaneously stimulates small-scale biological CO2 assimilation and large-scale biogeochemical C and N cycles in the ocean.

  • 90.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A bee-fly's host, Facebook, and DNA Barcoding.2016In: Barcode Bulletin, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 91.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    DNA-streckkodning - så går det till2014In: Bi-lagan, no 1, p. 14-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 92.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bjelke, Ulf
    Bergsten, J. & Bjelke U. 2018. Digital illustrerad bestämningsnyckel till Sveriges skräddare. I: Artnyckeln. ArtDatabanken, SLU, Uppsala. https://www.artnyckeln.se/type/gerridae-2000939-fullvuxna-skraddare.2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 93.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Göthberg, Anders
    Johansson, Karolina
    Pettersson, Arne
    Burkart, Werner
    Burkart, Gudrun
    Entomologmötet på Gotland 2017: temaexkursion med fokus på vattenlevande skalbaggar, skinnbaggar och trollsländor i Äskåkersvät.2017In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 139, no 1, p. 39-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The yearly Swedish entomology meeting 2017 was organized by the local entomology

    society of Gotland, on the northern part of the Baltic island Gotland near Bunge, 4-6 August.

    One thematic excursion was focused on aquatic insects, especiallly aquatic beetles,

    bugs and dragonflies. A shallow pond, Äskåkersvät, with Characeae in an open grazed

    landscape with high natural values was studied. Äskåkersvät lies just adjacent to the larger

    area around lake Bästeträsk which is the focus of a pilot study evaluating its potential as

    a future national park. The pilot study is undertaken by Gotland County Administrative

    Board, the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, Region Gotland and the Swedish

    Agency for Marine and Water Management. Here we give an annotated report of the 103

    species found: 69 species of water beetles (out of which 34 were Dytiscidae), 20 species

    of aquatic or semiaquatic bugs (out of which 10 were Corixidae), and 14 species of dragonflies.

    These include Hydrophilus piceus and H. aterrimus redlisted in Sweden (both as

    NT), and Dytiscus latissimus, globally redlisted (VU). We also noted the noble crayfish,

    Astacus astacus (redlisted as CR in Sweden) and the European medicinal leech Hirudo

    medicinalis (redlisted as NT globally). The blue emperor dragonfly (Anax imperator) was

    noted, a species first recorded from Gotland in 2002 and we present a graph on its increase

    and spreading on the island since. The number of species found in spite of a relatively

    modest collecting effort at a suboptimal time when many species may be in pupal stage out

    of water as witnessed by many teneral individuals, indicates a species rich locality with

    high natural value. The stoneworts (Characeae) vegetation certainly contributes to this, for

    instance vouched for by the occurrence of specialists as Haliplus confinis and H. obliquus

    whose larvae feed on stoneworts.

  • 94.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Lindberg, Gunvi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vårdal, hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Apelqvist, Niklas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Brodin, Yngve
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Arbetet med donationer av insektsamlingar vid Naturhistoriska Riksmuseet2014In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 134, p. 153-162Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the work with donated insect collections at the Swedish Museum of Natural

    History (NRM) in Stockholm, Sweden. The museum receives donations yearly from

    amateur entomologists, and they are an important contribution to the enrichment of the

    collections. For the collector it is satisfying that a public institution takes on the long term

    responsibility of safeguarding the scientific value in a collection, curating and making it

    available for study. Significant donations in the last years include that of Lars Huggert

    (Hymenoptera, Coleoptera), Hans Bartsch (Diptera) and Anders N. Nilsson (aquatic Coleoptera)

    to name a few. The curatorial and digitizing workload at the Entomology collection

    are unfortunately not matched by staff funding, and as at other European museums

    volunteer work constitute vital and invaluable help. We acknowledge especially some of

    the volunteer work in the Coleoptera and Hymenoptera collections. Recently we have engaged

    with amateur entomologists by organizing taxon-specific workshops at the museum

    which has stimulated exchange and collaboration. The Hymenoptera-day was visited by 30

    participants, and the Diptera-meeting by 49. As an example of what happens with a donation

    once it reaches the museum, we describe the work with a recent Coleoptera collection

    donation by Jan Olsson, Vallentuna. A few highlights from the unidentified material,

    including the Archostematan beetle Priacma serrata (Cupedidae) and the false jewelbeetle

    Schizopus laetus (Schizopodidae), are presented as they were new to the NRM collections.

    We also bring attention to two new websites: www.naturarv.se is the webportal presenting

    digitized material in Swedish natural history collections. Both metadata on specimens and

    photos are made searchable here. We also launch a new webpage at www.nrm.se/insektsdonationer

    where we write about new donations to the Entomology collections, with Jan

    Olsson’s Coleoptera collection first out.

  • 95.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nilsson, Lars G R
    Bukontaite, Rasa
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    Åkerjordfly, Agrotis exclamationis, identifierad som värdart för svävflugan Villa hottentotta med hjälp av DNA streckkodning (Diptera: Bombyliidae).2015In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 136, no 4, p. 121-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we identify Agrotis exclamationis (Linnaeus, 1758) as a host species for the bee y Villa hottentotta (Linnaeus, 1758) in Sweden. Host use and speci city for bee y species are generally very poorly known, why the hatching of a bee y of the genus Villa from an unknown Noctuid pupa caught our attention. The parasitized Noctuid pupa was found in a garden in Staffanstorp, Skåne (Sweden), in May 2015 and kept in a jar to hatch. The bee y hatched in June leaving two empty exuviae in the jar. DNA was extracted sepa- rately from both excuviae to identify the y and the host using DNA Barcoding. A 600+ bp long sequence of the gene Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 was sequenced for both samples and queried against the reference library BOLD (www.boldsystems.org). The Noctuid host pupa was unambiguously identi ed as the common Noctuid species Agrotis exclamationis. The sequence was identical to the most common haplotype over much of Europe. The bee y pupa was identi ed as Villa hottentotta, the most common Villa species in Sweden. This added a new Noctuid species to the list of known hosts for V. hottentotta which also includes several other Noctuid genera as well as a Geometrid moth. Belonging to the sand chamber group of bee ies where the female scatter the eggs on the ground while hovering, the active host-seeking rst instar planidium larvae bene ts from having a wide host range to potentially encounter in the substrate zone. 

  • 96.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Weingartner, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University.
    Hajek, Jiri
    Species delimitation of the Hyphydrus ovatus complex in western Palaearctic with an update of species distributions (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae)2017In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 678, p. 73-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The species status of Hyphydrus anatolicus Guignot, 1957 and H. sanctus Sharp, 1882, previously often confused with the widespread H. ovatus (Linnaeus, 1760), are tested with molecular and morphological characters. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) was sequenced for 32 specimens of all three species. Gene-trees were inferred with parsimony, time-free bayesian and strict clock bayesian analyses. The GMYC model was used to estimate species limits. All three species were reciprocally monophyletic with CO1 and highly supported. The GMYC species delimitation analysis unequivocally delimited the three species with no other than the three species solution included in the confidence interval. A likelihood ratio test rejected the one-species null model. Important morphological characters distinguishing the species are provided and illustrated. New distributional data are given for the following species: Hyphydrus anatolicus from Slovakia and Ukraine, and H. aubei Ganglbauer, 1891, and H. sanctus from Turkey.

  • 97.
    Bergström, Jan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Hou, Xian-Guang
    Yunnan University, Kunming.
    Hålenius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Gut contents and feeding in the Cambrian arthropod Naraoia2007In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 129, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 98. Bergström, L. Gunnar W.
    et al.
    Bergquist, Sara
    Stenhagen, Gunnar
    Gahmberg, Carl G.
    Campos D. Maia, Arthur
    Nordenstam, BertilThe Indonesian government fears that demand for palm oil in Europe could falter
    Floral scent chemistry within the genus Linnaea (Caprifoliaceae)2018In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, article id e01732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Beauty bush’ and ‘twin ower’ are common names attributed to two well-recognizable species belonging to the genus Linnaea (16 spp.) – L. amabilis and L. borealis – long admired by botanists and gardeners for their perfumed paired bell-shaped owers. In the present study, we investigated their oral scent compositions through gas chro- matography – mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of dynamic headspace samples. Because the owers of L. borealis in wild populations are fragrant both during the day and in the evening, circadian variation of scent emission was also assessed for this species. In total, 26 chemical compounds comprise the oral scent bouquets of L. amabilis and L. borealis, identi ed as monoterpenes (14), benzenoids and phenyl- propanoids (5), aliphatics (3), sesquiterpenes (3) and irregular terpenes (1). Whereas monoterpenes, notably (-)-α- and β-pinene, dominated the scent of L. amabilis (over 82% relative abundance), benzene derivates: 1,4 dimethoxybenzene, anisalde- hyde, 2-phenylethanol, benzaldehyde and nicotinaldehyde were exclusive to anal- ysed headspace samples of L. borealis, accounting for 52% to 100% of their relative compositions, in three Swedish populations. A southwestern Finnish population was characterized by the four rst mentioned benzenoid compounds and large amounts of (-)-α- and β-pinenes plus two aliphatic substances. e scent compounds identi- ed for both species are ubiquitous and may serve as generalist attractants/stimulants for a broad assortment of anthophilous insects. e basic work on the ower scent of L. amabilis and L. borealis should inspire studies of their pollination biology, primarily the behaviour-guiding roles of the characteristic emitted volatiles. 

  • 99. BERMÚDEZ,, Hermann Darío
    et al.
    ARENILLAS, Ignacio
    ARZ, José Antonio
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    RENNE, Paul R.
    GILABERT, Vicente
    RODRÍGUEZ, José Vicente
    The Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary deposits on Gorgonilla Island2018In: The Geology of Colombia: Volume  3   Paleogene – Neogene / [ed] Tapias, J.G. et al., Bogota: Servicio Geológico Colombiano , 2018, p. 1-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A ~20 mm thick spherule bed representing Chicxulub impact ejecta deposits and marking the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary was recently discovered on Gorgonilla Island (Gorgona National Natural Park, Pacific of Colombia). This discovery represents the first confirmed record of the K/Pg event in Colombia, South America and the eastern Pacific Ocean. The deposit consists of extraordinarily well–preserved glass spherules (microtektites and microkrystites) reaching 1.1 mm in diameter. Importantly, the Gorgonilla spherule bed is unique relative to other K/Pg boundary sites in that up to 90% of the spherules are intact and not devitrified, and the bed is virtually devoid of lithic fragments and microfossils. The spherules were deposited in a deep marine environment, possibly below the calcite compensation depth. The preservation, normal size–gradation, presence of fine textures within the spherules, and absence of bioturbation or traction transport indicate that the Gorgonilla spherules settled within a water column with minimal disturbance. Thus, the spherule bed may represent one of the first parautochthonous primary deposits of the Chicxulub impact known to date. 40Ar/39Ar dating and micropaleontological analysis reveal that the Gorgonilla spherule bed resulted from the Chicxulub impact. Intense soft–sediment deformation and bed disruption in Maastrichtian sediments of the Gorgonilla Island K/Pg section provide evidence for seismic activity triggered by the Chicxulub bolide impact, 66 million years ago. It is also notable that the basal deposits of the Danian in the Colombian locality present the first evidence of a recovery vegetation, characterized by ferns from a tropical habitat, shortly following the end–Cretaceous event.

  • 100. Bernor, R. L.
    et al.
    Fahlbusch, V.
    Andrews, P.
    De Bruijn, H.
    Fortelius, M.
    Rögl, F.
    Steininger, F. F.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    The evolution of western Eurasian Neogene faunas: a chronologic, systematic, biogeographic, and paleoenvironmental synthesis1996In: The Evolution of Western Eurasian Miocene Mammal Faunas / [ed] Bernor, R.L., Fahlbusch, V. & Mittmann, H.-W., New York: Columbia University Press, 1996, p. 449-469Chapter in book (Refereed)
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