Change search
Refine search result
1234567 51 - 100 of 534
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Britz, Ralf
    et al.
    Senckenberg Natural History Collections Dresden, Museum of Zoology.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rüber, Lukas
    Naturhistorisches Museum Bern.
    Dario tigris and Dario melanogrammus, two new species of miniature chameleon fishes from northern Myanmar (Teleostei: Badidae)2022In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5138, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dario tigris, new species, is described from mountain streams south of Mogaung, in the Ayeyarwaddy River basin, Myanmar. It differs from congeneric species by its unique colour pattern, which consists of a series of eight straight vertical bars, the first two of which in males are ash-grey and the subsequent six are orange-red in life, combined with a series of small black spots arranged in three to four rows dorsolaterally on the head and nape. It differs further from its close relative Dario hysginon, with which it may occur syntopically, by fewer dorsal-fin spines (modally 14 vs modally 15), and fewer vertebrae (modally 12+12=24 vs modally 12+13= 25). Dario melanogrammus, new species, is another barred Dario from the Chindwin River basin. It differs from all other species of the genus by its zigzagging dark vertical bars; amongst Myanmar species, it can be further distinguished from D. hysginon and D. tigris by more vertebrae (modally 26 vs 25 in D. hysginon, and 24 in D. tigris).

  • 52. Broad, G. R.
    et al.
    Stigenberg, J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The genus Orionis Shaw (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Euphorinae) in the Old World.2021In: Journal of Hymenoptera Research, ISSN 1070-9428, E-ISSN 1314-2607, Vol. 88, p. 133-145Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Brodin, Yngve
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hellberg, Jörgen
    Smaller, lighter coloured and less hairy Procladius (Diptera, Chironomidae) in warmer climate2023In: Biologia, ISSN 0006-3088, E-ISSN 1336-9563, Vol. 78, no 8, p. 2091-2098Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54. Buffington, Matthew L
    et al.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Redescription of Ganaspis brasiliensis (Ihering, 1905), new combiantion, (Hymenoptera: Figitidae) a natural enemy of the invasive Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura, 1931) (Diptera: Drosophilidae)2016In: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, ISSN 0013-8797, Vol. 118, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new combination of Ganaspis brasiliensis (Ihering, 1905) is proposed, and the species is redescribed from historical specimens taken in the Neotropical Region as well as more recent specimens reared from Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, 1931 in South Korea. Drosophila suzukii, otherwise known as the spotted-wing Drosophila, is a major pest of soft fruits the world over, and the search for effective natural enemies of this fly are ongoing. Though not parasitoids of D. suzukii, we also propose the following new combinations: Dieucoila brasiliensis (Kieffer, 1909), new combination, and Dieucoila brasiliana (Weld, 1952), new combination. After summarizing all known species of Eucoilinae with the specific epithet ‘brasiliensis’, we encourage future researchers to avoid this name in order prevent nomenclatural confusion.

  • 55. Buffington, Matthew L
    et al.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The description of Garudella Buffington and Forshage, new genus (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae)2014In: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, ISSN 0013-8797, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 225-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Garudella, a remarkable new genus of eucoiline wasp is described from Thailand, Laos, and the Republic of Congo. Four new species of Garudella are described as well: G. acothonaspis, G. afrotropica, G. algo, and G. alicae. Several autapomorphies distinguish this genus from other eucoiline genera: a distinctly protracted and broadened pronotal plate; a massive, posteriorly protruding prop- odeum; reduced posterior rim of metapleuron; reduced scutellar foveae and lack of lateral bar “windows”; and a generally reduced scutellar plate. In addition, the posterior of the head has a distinctly curved occipital impression, resulting in the cuticle surrounding the foramen magnum to be extruded into a neck-like process. The biology of Garudella is unknown, but based on phylogenetic inference from morphology, the presumed host could be a cyclorrhaphous Diptera in a saprophagous environment.

  • 56. Buffington, Matthew L
    et al.
    Gallardo, Fabiana E
    Reche, Vanina
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A Revision of Zaeucoila Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Figitidae), Parasitoids of Agromyzidae (Diptera): New Species, Identity, Distribution, and Hosts2017In: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, ISSN 0013-8797, Vol. 119, no 3, p. 317-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eucoiline genus Zaeucoila Ashmead is revised. Following a re- evaluation combining previously published phylogenetic data and new specimens, Agrostocynips D ́ıaz is synonymized with Zaeucoila. All species included in Zaeucoila are systematically treated, and now amounts to twelve, seven of which are described as new here: Zaeucoila bitiburculata new species, Z. fidalgoii new species, Z. infuscata new species, Z. johnsonii new species, Z. lignys new species, Z. normae new species, Z. patera new species. The following new combinations are proposed and species redescribed: Zaeucoila grenadensis (Ashmead), new combination; Z. robusta (Ashmead), new combination; Z. flavipes (Ashmead), new combination. Agrostocynips diastrophi (Ashmead), Agrostocynips clavatus D ́ıaz, and Agrostocynips enneatoma (D ́ıaz) are new synonyms of Zaeucoila robusta. Zaeucoila incompleta (Kieffer), Z. triangu- lifera Kieffer, and Z. unicarinata Ashmead are redescribed. Zaeucoila is an unusual genus of Zaeucoilini in its wide distribution area: it can be found from southern Argentina well into the eastern United States and southern Canada; no other zaeucoiline genus shows such a pattern. Host records and geographic data for Zaeucoila are brought up to date, as well as a key to species. Zeucoila are primary parasitoids of Agromyzidae, including Liriomyza trifolii and other species that are notable economic pests of agriculture. Tropideucoila fulvonotata (Kieffer) is transferred to Marthiella (new combination).

  • 57.
    Celemín, Enrique
    et al.
    University of Potsdam, Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, Evolutionary Biology & Systematic Zoology Potsdam Germany.
    Autenrieth, Marijke
    University of Potsdam, Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, Evolutionary Biology & Systematic Zoology Potsdam Germany.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring. Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Pawliczka, Iwona
    Prof. Krzysztof Skóra Hel Marine Station, Faculty of Oceanography and Geography University of Gdansk Hel Poland.
    Quintela, María
    Institute of Marine Research Bergen Norway.
    Lindstrøm, Ulf
    Institute of Marine Research Tromsø Norway;UiT The Arctic University of Norway Tromsø Norway.
    Benke, Harald
    Deutsches Meeresmuseum Stralsund Germany.
    Siebert, Ursula
    Institute for Terrestrial and Aquatic Wildlife Research (ITAW), University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover Foundation Büsum Germany.
    Lockyer, Christina
    Age Dynamics Kongens Lyngby Denmark.
    Berggren, Per
    School of Natural and Environmental Sciences Newcastle University Newcastle upon Tyne UK.
    Özturk, A. Amaha
    Marine Biology Department, Faculty of Fisheries Istanbul University Istanbul Turkey.
    Özturk, Bayram
    Marine Biology Department, Faculty of Fisheries Istanbul University Istanbul Turkey.
    Lesage, Véronique
    Fisheries and Oceans Canada Maurice Lamontagne Institute Mont‐Joli Quebec Canada.
    Tiedemann, Ralph
    University of Potsdam, Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, Evolutionary Biology & Systematic Zoology Potsdam Germany.
    Evolutionary history and seascape genomics of Harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) across environmental gradients in the North Atlantic and adjacent waters2023In: Molecular Ecology Resources, ISSN 1755-098X, E-ISSN 1755-0998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) is a highly mobile cetacean species primarily occurring in coastal and shelf waters across the Northern hemisphere. It inhabits heterogeneous seascapes broadly varying in salinity and temperature. Here, we produced 74 whole genomes at intermediate coverage to study Harbour porpoise's evolutionary history and investigate the role of local adaptation in the diversification into subspecies and populations. We identified ~6 million high quality SNPs sampled at eight localities across the North Atlantic and adjacent waters, which we used for population structure, demographic and genotype–environment association analyses. Our results suggest a genetic differentiation between three subspecies (P.p. relicta, P.p. phocoena and P.p. meridionalis), and three distinct populations within P.p. phocoena: Atlantic, Belt Sea and Proper Baltic Sea. Effective population size and Tajima's D suggest population contraction in Black Sea and Iberian porpoises, but expansion in the P.p. phocoena populations. Phylogenetic trees indicate post-glacial colonization from a southern refugium. Genotype–environment association analysis identified salinity as major driver in genomic variation and we identified candidate genes putatively underlying adaptation to different salinity. Our study highlights the value of whole genome resequencing to unravel subtle population structure in highly mobile species, shows how strong environmental gradients and local adaptation may lead to population differentiation, and how neutral and adaptive markers can give different perspectives on population subdivision. The results have great conservation implications as we found inbreeding and low genetic diversity in the endangered Black Sea subspecies and identified the critically endangered Proper Baltic Sea porpoises as a separate population.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 58.
    Ceríaco, Luis M P
    et al.
    Natural History and Science Museum, University of Porto, Porto , 4099-002 , Portugal.
    Aescht, Erna
    Biology Centre of the Upper Austrian Museum , J.-W.-Klein-Str. 73, 4040 Linz , Austria.
    Ahyong, Shane T
    Australian Museum, Sydney , NSW 2010 , Australia;School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales , Kensington, NSW 2052 , Australia.
    Ballerio, Alberto
    Viale Venezia 45 , I-25123 Brescia , Italy.
    Bouchard, Patrice
    Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa , Ontario, K1A 0C6 , Canada.
    Bourgoin, Thierry
    Institut Systématique, Evolution, Biodiversité (ISYEB), MNHN-CNRS-Sorbonne Université-EPHE-Université des Antilles, Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle , Paris 75005 , France.
    Dmitriev, Dmitry
    Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign , IL 61820 , USA.
    Evenhuis, Neal
    Department of Natural Sciences, Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu , HI 96817-2704 , USA.
    Grygier, Mark J
    National Museum of Marine Biology & Aquarium , Checheng, Pingtung 944401 , Taiwan.
    Harvey, Mark S
    Department of Terrestrial Zoology, Western Australian Museum , Welshpool DC, WA 6986 , Australia.
    Kottelat, Maurice
    Rue des Rauraques 6 , CH-2800 Delémont , Switzerland.
    Kluge, Nikita
    Department of Entomology, Saint-Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg , 199034 , Russia.
    Krell, Frank-T
    Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver , CO 80205-5798 , USA.
    Kojima, Jun-Ichi
    Natural History Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito , Ibaraki 310-8512 , Japan.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. FishBase.
    Lucinda, Paulo
    Laboratório de Ictiologia Sistemática, Universidade Federal do Tocantins , Tocantins, 77.500-000 , Brazil.
    Lyal, Christopher H C
    Department of Life Sciences, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD , UK.
    Pyle, Richard L
    Department of Natural Sciences, Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu , HI 96817-2704 , USA.
    Rheindt, Frank E
    National University of Singapore, Department of Biological Sciences , 16 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117558 , Singapore.
    Luisa Scioscia, Cristina
    Arachnology Division , Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales ‘Bernardino Rivadavia’, Buenos Aires , Argentina.
    Welter-Schultes, Francisco
    Abteilung Evolution und Biodiversität der Tiere und Zoologisches Museum, Universität Göttingen , Germany.
    Whitmore, Daniel
    Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart , D-70191 Stuttgart , Germany.
    Yanega, Douglas
    Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside , Riverside, CA 92521-0314 , USA.
    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang
    Landcare Research , Auckland 1072 , New Zealand;School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland , Auckland 1072 , New Zealand.
    Zhou, Hong-Zhang
    Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 , People’s Republic of China.
    Pape, Thomas
    Zoological Museum, Natural History Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen , DK-2100 , Denmark.
    Renaming taxa on ethical grounds threatens nomenclatural stability and scientific communication2023In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 197, no 2, p. 283-286Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 59. Chaline, J.
    et al.
    Werdelin, LarsSwedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Modes and Tempos of Evolution of Quaternary Mammals1993Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 60. Chang, Dan
    et al.
    Knapp, Michael
    Enk, Jacob
    Lippold, Sebastian
    Kircher, Martin
    Lister, Adrian
    MacPhee, Ross D. E.
    Widga, Christopher
    Czechowski, Paul
    Sommer, Robert
    Hodges, Emily
    Stuempel, Nikolaus
    Barnes, Ian
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Derevianko, Anatoly
    Germonpre, Mietje
    Hillebrand-Voiculescu, Alexandra
    Constantin, Silviu
    Kuznetsova, Tatyana
    Mol, Dick
    Rathgeber, Thomas
    Rosendahl, Wilfried
    Tikhonov, Alexey N.
    Willerslev, Eske
    Hannon, Greg
    Lalueza-Fox, Carles
    Joger, Ulrich
    Poinar, Hendrik
    Hofreiter, Michael
    Shapiro, Beth
    The evolutionary and phylogeographic history of woolly mammoths: a comprehensive mitogenomic analysis2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 44585Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 61. Chiarle, Alberto
    et al.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Isaia, Marco
    Courtship behavior in European species of the genus Pardosa (Araneae, Lycosidae)2013In: Journal of Arachnology, ISSN 0161-8202, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 108-125Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62. Conand, Chantal
    et al.
    Mulochau, Thierry
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Eléaume, Marc
    Chabanet, Pascale
    Inventory of echinoderms in the Iles Eparses (Europa, Glorieuses, Juan de Nova), Mozambique Channel, France2016In: Acta Oecologica, ISSN 1146-609X, E-ISSN 1873-6238, Vol. 72, p. 53-61-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 63. Conand, Chantal
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Eléaume, Marc
    Magalon, H.
    Chabanet, Pascale
    The Echinoderm fauna of Europa, Eparses Island, (Scattered Islands) in the Mozambique channel (South Western Indian Ocean)2013In: Cahiers de Biologie Marine, Vol. 54, p. 499-504Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 64. Costa Baião, Guilherme
    Revision of the West Palaearctic species of Rhoptromeris Förster, 1869 (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae)2018In: Journal of Natural History, ISSN 0022-2933, E-ISSN 1464-5262, Vol. 52, p. 1201-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The West Palearctic species of Rhoptromeris are revised. A total of 11 species are recognised as valid in this region, including four newly described species: Rhoptromeris dichromata sp. nov., Rhoptromeris koponeni sp. nov., Rhoptromeris leptocornis sp. nov. and Rhoptromeris macaronesiensis sp. nov. Eucoila luteicornis Ionescu, 1959 is synonymised with Rhoptromeris heptoma (Hartig, 1840) syn. nov. A checklist of the Holarctic Rhoptromeris is presented and an identification key to the West Palearctic species is provided.

  • 65. Costello, Mark J.
    et al.
    Bouchet, Philippe
    Boxshall, Geoff
    Fauchald, Kristian
    Gordon, Dennis
    Hoeksema, Bert W.
    Poore, Gary C. B.
    van Soest, Rob W. M.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Walter, T. Chad
    Vanhoorne, Bart
    Decock, Wim
    Appeltans, Ward
    Global Coordination and Standardisation in Marine Biodiversity through the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) and Related Databases2013In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 1, p. e51629-e51629Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66. Cote, Susanne M.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Seiffert, E. R.
    Barry, J. C.
    The enigmatic Early Miocene mammal Kelba and its relationship to the order Ptolemaiida2007In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 104, p. 5510-5515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kelba quadeemae, a fossil mammal from the Early Miocene of East Africa, was originally named on the basis of three isolated upper molars. Kelba has previously been interpreted as a creodont, a pantolestid, an insectivoran, and a hemigaline viverrid. The true affinities of this taxon have remained unclear because of the limited material and its unique morphology relative to other Miocene African mammals. New material of Kelba from several East African Miocene localities, most notably a skull from the Early Miocene locality of Songhor in Western Kenya, permits analysis of the affinities of Kelba and documents the lower dentition of this taxon. Morphological comparison of this new material clearly demonstrates that Kelba is a member of the order Ptolemaiida, a poorly understood group whose fossil record was previously restricted to the Oligocene Fayum deposits of northern Egypt. Phylogenetic analysis supports the monophyly of the Ptolemaiida, including Kelba, and recovers two monophyletic clades within the order. We provide new family names for these groups and an emended diagnosis for the order. The discovery of ptolemaiidans from the Miocene of East Africa is significant because it extends the known temporal range of the order by >10 million years and the geographic range by >3,200 km. Although the higher-level affinities of the Ptolemaiida remain obscure, their unique morphology and distribution through a larger area of Africa (and exclusively Africa) lend support to the idea that Ptolemaiida may have an ancient African origin.

  • 67. Coulson, S.J.
    et al.
    Convey, P.
    Aakra, K.
    Aarvik, L.
    Ávila-Jiménez, M.L.
    Babenko, A.
    Biersma, E.M.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Brittain, J.E.
    Carlsson, A.M.
    Christoffersen, K.
    De Smet, W.H.
    Ekrem, T.
    Fjellberg, A.
    Füreder, L.
    Gustafsson, D.
    Gwiazdowicz, D.J.
    Hansen, L.O.
    Holmstrup, M.
    Hullé, M.
    Kaczmarek, L.
    Kolicka, M.
    Kuklin, V.
    Lakka, H.-K.
    Lebedeva, N.
    Makarova, O.
    Maraldo, K.
    Melekhina, E.
    Ödegaard, F.
    Pilskog, H.E.
    Simon, J.C.
    Sohlenius, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Solhöy, T.
    Söli, G.
    Stur, E.
    Tanasevitch, A.
    Taskareva, A.
    Velle, G.
    Zawierucha, K.
    Zmudczynska-Skarbek, K.
    The terrestrial and freshwater invertebrate biodiversity of the archipelagoes of the Barents Sea; Svalbard, Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya2014In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 68, p. 440-470Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 68. Curini Galletti, Marco
    et al.
    Artois, Tom
    Di Domenico, Maikon
    Fontaneto, Diego
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jörger, Katharina
    Leasi, Francesca
    Martinez, Alejandro
    Norenburg, Jon
    Sterrer, Wolfgang
    Todaro, Antonio
    Contribution of soft-bodied meiofaunal taxa to Italian marine biodiversity2020In: The European Zoological Journal, ISSN 2475-0263, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 369-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meiofauna includes an astonishing diversity of organisms, whose census is far from being complete. Most classic ecological studies have focused on hard-bodied Ecdysozoan taxa (notably Copepoda and Nematoda), whose cuticle allows determination at species-level after fixation, rather than soft-bodied, Spiralian taxa, which most often lose any diagnostic feature in fixed samples. Yet, metabarcoding studies have recently revealed a species-richness of soft-bodied taxa comparable, and in cases superior, to that of Copepoda and Nematoda together. However, given objective difficulties inherent to their study, which necessarily has to be performed on living individuals, and their limited utilisation for ecological and applicative research, taxonomic expertise on soft-bodied organisms has declined over the years, and diversity of these phyla in most areas of the world is presently completely unknown. Here we present an expert-based survey of current knowledge on the composition and distribution of soft-bodied meiofaunal taxa in Italy, with special references to the predominantly or exclusively meiobenthic phyla Gastrotricha, Gnathostomulida, Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Xenacoelomorpha, and macrofaunal taxa with conspicuous meiofaunal representatives (Annelida, Mollusca and Nemertea). A total of 638 described species have been reported from Italian coasts; furthermore, the existence of a large number of undescribed species is mentioned. Knowledge of Annelida, Gastrotricha, and Rotifera appears particularly detailed, placing Italy among the best-known country worldwide. In contrast, knowledge of Platyhelminthes and Xenacoelomorpha appears patchy, and limited to few areas. Sampling effort has been uneven, with most species recorded from the Tyrrhenian Sea, while large sections of the Adriatic and Ionian seas have been poorly explored. Results highlight the role that Marine Biological Stations, notably the Zoological Station “Anton Dohrn” in Naples, have had in promoting the study of soft-bodied taxa in Italy.

  • 69.
    Dalen, L
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Elmhagen, B
    Angerbjorn, A
    DNA analysis on fox faeces and competition induced niche shifts2004In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 2389-2392Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Dalen, L
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fuglei, E
    Hersteinsson, P
    Kapel, C M O
    Roth, J D
    Samelius, G
    Tannerfeldt, M
    Angerbjorn, A
    Population history and genetic structure of a circumpolar species: the arctic fox2005In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4066, E-ISSN 1095-8312, Vol. 84, no 1, p. 79-89Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Dalen, L
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Gotherstrom, A
    Angerbjorn, A
    Identifying species from pieces of faeces2004In: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 109-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Dalen, L
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Gotherstrom, A
    Tannerfeldt, M
    Angerbjorn, A
    Is the endangered Fennoscandian arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) population genetically isolated?2002In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 171-178, article id PII S0006-3207(01)00180-XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Dalen, L.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Kvaloy, K.
    Linnell, J. D. C.
    Elmhagen, B.
    Strand, O.
    Tannerfeldt, M.
    Henttonen, H.
    Fuglei, E.
    Landa, A.
    Angerbjorn, A.
    Population structure in a critically endangered arctic fox population: does genetics matter?2006In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 2809-2819Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Dalen, Love
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Gotherstrom, Anders
    Meijer, Tomas
    Shapiro, Beth
    Recovery of DNA from Footprints in the Snow2007In: Canadian field-naturalist, ISSN 0008-3550, Vol. 121, no 3, p. 321-324Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Dalen, Love
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Lagerholm, Vendela K.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Nylander, Johan A. A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Barton, Nick
    Bochenski, Zbigniew M.
    Tomek, Teresa
    Rudling, David
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Stewart, John R.
    Identifying Bird Remains Using Ancient DNA Barcoding2017In: Genes, ISSN 2073-4425, E-ISSN 2073-4425, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 76.
    Dalen, Love
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Nystrom, Veronica
    Valdiosera, Cristina
    Germonpre, Mietje
    Sablin, Mikhail
    Turner, Elaine
    Angerbjorn, Anders
    Arsuaga, Juan Luis
    Gotherstrom, Anders
    Ancient DNA reveals lack of postglacial habitat tracking in the arctic fox2007In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 104, no 16, p. 6726-6729Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Dalen, Love
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Orlando, Ludovic
    Shapiro, Beth
    Brandstrom-Durling, Mikael
    Quam, Rolf
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Diez Fernandez-Lomana, J. Carlos
    Willerslev, Eske
    Luis Arsuaga, Juan
    Goetherstrom, Anders
    Partial Genetic Turnover in Neandertals: Continuity in the East and Population Replacement in the West2012In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 1893-1897Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 78. Dalerum, Fredrik
    et al.
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Frojd, Christina
    Lecomte, Nicolas
    Lindgren, Asa
    Meijer, Tomas
    Pecnerova, Patricia
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Angerbjorn, Anders
    Spatial variation in Arctic hare (Lepus arcticus) populations around the Hall Basin2017In: Polar Biology, ISSN 0722-4060, E-ISSN 1432-2056, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 2113-2118Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 79. DE LUCENA, CARLOS A. SANTOS
    et al.
    KULLANDER, SVEN
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    NORÉN, MICHAEL
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division. FishBase.
    CALEGARI, BÁRBARA BORGES
    Healing nomenclature: making the names Australoheros mboapari and Australoheros ricani available (Teleostei: Cichlidae)2023In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5306, no 4, p. 497-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A close analysis of a publication effort by the authors of the present paper suggests that they need to issue a clarificationto avoid confusion about the nomenclatural status of two species in the genus Australoheros, also known as chanchitos(‘piglets’).

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 80. De Meyer, Marc
    et al.
    Földvari, Mihaly
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Skevington, Jeffrey H.
    61. Pipunculidae2021In: Manual of Afrotropical Diptera. Vol. 3: Brachycera–Cyclorrhapha, excluding Calyptratae / [ed] Kirk-Spriggs, A.H.; Sinclair, B.J., Pretoria: South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) , 2021, p. 1493-1505Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 81.
    Delling, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Palm, Stefan
    Palkopoulou, Eleftheria
    Prestegaard, Tore
    Genetic signs of multiple colonization events in Baltic ciscoes with radiation into sympatric spring- and autumnspawners confined to early postglacial arrival2014In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 4, no 22, p. 4346-4360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presence of sympatric populations may reflect local diversification or secondary contact of already distinct forms. The Baltic cisco (Coregonus albula) normally spawns in late autumn, but in a few lakes in Northern Europe sympatric autumn and spring- or winter-spawners have been described. So far, the evolutionary relationships and taxonomic status of these main life history forms have remained largely unclear. With microsatellites and mtDNA sequences, we analyzed extant and extinct spring- and autumn-spawners from a total of 23 Swedish localities, including sympatric populations. Published sequences from Baltic ciscoes in Germany and Finland, and Coregonus sardinella from North America were also included together with novel mtDNA sequences from Siberian C. sardinella. A clear genetic structure within Sweden was found that included two population assemblages markedly differentiated at microsatellites and apparently fixed for mtDNA haplotypes from two distinct clades. All sympatric Swedish populations belonged to the same assemblage, suggesting parallel evolution of spring-spawning rather than secondary contact. The pattern observed further suggests that postglacial immigration to Northern Europe occurred from at least two different refugia. Previous results showing that mtDNA in Baltic cisco is paraphyletic with respect to North American C. sardinella were confirmed. However, the inclusion of Siberian C. sardinella revealed a more complicated pattern, as these novel haplotypes were found within one of the two main C. albula clades and were clearly distinct from those in North American C. sardinella. The evolutionary history of Northern Hemisphere ciscoes thus seems to be more complex than previously recognized.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 82.
    Delling, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sabatini, Andrea
    Muracciole, Stephane
    Tougard, Christelle
    Berrebi, Patrick
    Morphologic and genetic characterisation of Corsican and Sardinian trout with comments on Salmo taxonomy2020In: Knowledge & Management of Aquatic EcosystemsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Deprá, Gabriel C.
    et al.
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá.
    Kullander, Sven O.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Pavanelli, Carla S,
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá.
    da Graça, Wefterson J.
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá.
    A new colorful species of Geophagus (Teleostei: Cichlidae), endemic to the rio Aripuanã in the Amazon basin of Brazil2014In: Neotropical Ichthyology, ISSN 1679-6225, E-ISSN 1982-0224, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 737-746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geophagus mirabilis, new species, is endemic to the rio Aripuanã drainage upstream from Dardanelos/Andorinhas falls.The new species is distinguished from all other species of the genus by the presence of one to five large black spots arrangedlongitudinally along the middle of the flank, in addition to the black midlateral spot that is characteristic of species in thegenus and by a pattern of iridescent spots and lines on the head in living specimens. It is further distinguished from allcongeneric species, except G. camopiensis and G. crocatus, by the presence of seven (vs. eight or more) scale rows in thecircumpeduncular series below the lateral line (7 in G. crocatus; 7-9 in G. camopiensis). Including the new species, five cichlids and 11 fish species in total are known only from the upper rio Aripuanã, and 15 fish species in total are known only from the rio Aripuanã drainage

  • 84. Doguzhaeva, Larisa
    et al.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    The capsule – a newly discovered organic shell structure in the Late Cretaceous belemnite Gonioteuthis from north-west Germany.2011In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Palaeontology, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 397-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An unusual, bilaterally symmetrical black structure that embraces the protoconch and the phragmocone and is overlain by a rostrum has been studied in the Santonian– early Campanian (Late Cretaceous) belemnite genus Gonioteuthis from Braunschweig, north-west Germany. The structure is here named the capsule. Energy dispersed spectrometry analyses of the capsule show a co-occurrence of sulphur with zinc, barium, iron, lead and titanium, suggesting their chemical association. The capsule was originally made of organic material that was diagenetically transformed into sulphur-containing matter. The material of the capsule differs from the chitin of the connecting rings in the same specimens. The capsule has a complex morphology: (1) ventral and dorsal wing-like projections that are repeated in a breviconic shape of the alveolus, (2) an aperture with lateral lobes and ventral and dorsal sinuses copied by growth lines and (3) a ventral ridge that fits with the position of the fissure in the rostrum. The alveolus in the most anterior part of the rostrum is crater-like. It is lined with thin, pyritized, laminated material, which appears to be the outermost portion of the capsule attached to the inner surface of the rostrum. A flare along the periphery of the alveolus marks a region where the rostrum was not yet formed, suggesting that the capsule extended beyond the rostrum. Modification of the skeleton in Gonioteuthis comprises a set of supposedly interrelated changes, such as innovation of the organic capsule, partial elimination of the calcareous rostrum and a diminishing of the pro-ostracum, resulting in the appearance of a new type of pro-ostracum that became narrower and shorter and lost the spatula-like shape and gently curved growth lines of a median field that are typical for the majority of Jurassic and Cretaceous belemnites. The partial replacement of a calcareous rostrum with an organic capsule in belemnitellids may have been an adaptive reaction to an unfavourable environmental condition, perhaps related to difficulties in calcium carbonate secretion during the Late Cretaceous that forced animals to reduce carbonate production and to secret an organic capsule around the protoconch and the phragmocone.

  • 85.
    Dondale, Charles D.
    et al.
    Biodiversity, Researh Branch, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Buckle, Donald J.
    Confirmation of the presence of Xysticus chippewa in Europe (Araneae, Thomisidae)2006In: Bulletin of the British arachnological Society, ISSN 0524-4994, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 361-364Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 86. Dong, Xi-ping
    et al.
    Cunningham, John A.
    University of Bristol.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Thomas, Ceri-Wyn
    Liu, Jianbo
    Stampanoni, Marco
    Donoghue, Philip C.J.
    University of Bristol.
    Embryos, polyps and medusae of the early Cambrian scyphozoan Olivooides.2013In: Proceedings of the Royal Society Biological Sciences Series B, ISSN 0962-8452, Vol. 280, no 2130071, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Early Cambrian organism Olivooides is known from both embryonic and post-embryonic stages and, consequently, it has the potential to yield vital insights into developmental evolution at the time that animal body plans were established. However, this potential can only be realized if the phylogenetic relationships of Olivooides can be constrained. The affinities of Olivooides have proved controversial because of the lack of knowledge of the internal anatomy and the limited range of developmental stages known. Here, we describe rare embryonic specimens in which internal anatomical features are preserved. We also present a fuller sequence of fossilized developmental stages of Olivooides, including associated specimens that we interpret as budding ephyrae ( juvenile medusae), all of which display a clear pentaradial symmetry. Within the framework of a cnidarian interpretation, the new data serve to pinpoint the phylogenetic position of Olivooides to the scyphozoan stem group. Hypotheses about scalidophoran or echinoderm affinities of Olivooides can be rejected.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Dong_etal_2013_Olivooides
  • 87. Drolshagen, B.
    et al.
    Bäckstam, Christian M.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A taxonomic review of the mygalomorph spider genus Linothele Karsch, 1879 (Araneae, Dipluridae).2021In: Zoosystema, ISSN 1280-9551, E-ISSN 1638-9387, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 163-196Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 88.
    Désamorè, Aurélie
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Laenen, Benjamin
    Miller, Kelly
    University of New Mexico.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Early burst in body size evolution is uncoupled from species diversification in diving beetles (Dytiscidae)2018In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 979-993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in morphology are often thought to be linked to changes in species diversification,

    which is expected to leave a signal of early burst (EB) in phenotypic traits.

    However, such signal is rarely recovered in empirical phylogenies, even for groups

    with well-known adaptive radiation. Using a comprehensive phylogenetic approach

    in Dytiscidae, which harbours ~4,300 species with as much as 50-fold variation in

    body size among them, we ask whether pattern of species diversification correlates

    with morphological evolution. Additionally, we test whether the large variation in

    body size is linked to habitat preference and whether the latter influences species

    turnover. We found, in sharp contrast to most animal groups, that Dytiscidae body

    size evolution follows an early-burst model with subsequent high phylogenetic conservatism.

    However, we found no evidence for associated shifts in species diversification,

    which point to an uncoupled evolution of morphology and species

    diversification. We recovered the ancestral habitat of Dytiscidae as lentic (standing

    water), with many transitions to lotic habitat (running water) that are concomitant

    to a decrease in body size. Finally, we found no evidence for difference in net diversification

    rates between habitats nor difference in turnover in lentic and lotic species.

    This result, together with recent findings in dragonflies, contrasts with some

    theoretical expectations of the habitat stability hypothesis. Thus, a thorough

    reassessment of the impact of dispersal, gene flow and range size on the speciation

    process is needed to fully encompass the evolutionary consequences of the lentic–

    lotic divide for freshwater fauna.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 89. Eames, Jonathan C.
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    The Björkegren expeditions to French Indochina: A collection of birds from Vietnam and Cambodia1996In: Natural History Bulletin of the Siam Society, ISSN 0080-9462, Vol. 44, p. 75-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 90. Eichsteller, Angelina
    et al.
    Taylor, James
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Brix, Saskia
    Martìnez Arbizu, Pedro
    DNA Barcoding of Cold-Water Coral-Associated Ophiuroid Fauna from the North Atlantic2022In: Diversity, E-ISSN 1424-2818, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 358-358Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 91. Elder, Leanne
    et al.
    Hsiang, Allison
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Nelson, Kaylea
    Strotz, Luke
    Kahanamoku, Sara
    Hull, Pincelli
    Sixty-one thousand recent planktonic foraminifera from the Atlantic Ocean2018In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 5, p. 180109-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 92. Elmqvist, H.
    et al.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Myrlejonsländor2023In: Yrfän, Vol. 2, p. 10-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 93.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Amarilla, Luis L.
    First observations and new distributional data for birds in Paraguay1997In: Bulletin of the British Ornithologists' Club, ISSN 0007-1595, Vol. 117, p. 60-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 94.
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Blom, Mozes P. K.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    A genomic perspective of the pink-headed duck Rhodonessa caryophyllacea suggests a long history of low effective population size2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 16853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for the possibly extinct pink-headed duck Rhodonessa caryophyllacea unambiguously shows that it belongs to the pochard radiation that also includes the genera Aythya and Netta. It is the sister to all modern-day pochards and belongs to a lineage that branched off from the others more than 2.8 million years ago. Rhodonessa caryophyllacea is believed to never have been common in modern time and we show this has probably been the situation for as long as 100,000 years. Our results suggest that their effective population size varied between 15,000 and 25,000 individuals during the last 150,000 years of the Pleistocene. The reasons behind this are largely unknown as very little is known about the life-history and biology of this species. Presumably it is due to factors related to feeding or to breeding, but we may never know this for sure.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 95.
    Eriksson, Pia
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Carlström, Julia
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Akustisk tumlarövervakning i Kattegatt: Del 1. Sammanställning av data från 2019–20222022Report (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 96.
    Eriksson, Pia
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Sköld, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Owen, Kylie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Determination of a correction factor for C-POD data comparability: Accounting for irregular settings between C-POD deployments2023Report (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 97.
    Ersmark, Erik
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Orlando, Ludovic
    Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Barnes, Ian
    Barnett, Ross
    Stuart, Anthony
    Lister, Adrian
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Population Demography and Genetic Diversity in the Pleistocene Cave Lion2015In: Open Quaternary, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 98. Fatemi, Yaser
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Annotated species list of Ophiuroidea (Echinodermata) from the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman, with new records2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4711, no 1, p. 77-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Fernholm, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kumar, Biju
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    First record of hagfish (Cyclostomata: Myxinidae) in Indian waters2017In: Journal of Threatened Taxa, ISSN 0974-7893, E-ISSN 0974-7907, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 10365-10368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One specimen of hag fish Eptatretus sp. was collected from the Arabian Sea, off Kerala coast of India at 500-600 m depth. The phylogenetic analysis using the sequence of mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase C (CO1) suggested the Eptatretus sp. collected from India is distinct from all other species where sequence data is available and P ID (Liberal) for Eptatretus sp. collected from India is 0.96, indicating a high probability that an unknown member of the putative species would be correctly identified as a member once more specimens are collected.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 100.
    Fernholm, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Mincarone, Michael Maia
    Instituto de Biodiversidade e Sustentabilidade Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Macaé Brazil;Schmid College of Science and Technology Chapman University Orange California USA.
    A new species of the hagfish genus Eptatretus (Myxinidae) from the Bahamas, western North Atlantic2023In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 102, no 4, p. 962-967Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 51 - 100 of 534
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf