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  • 51.
    Schwarzhans, Werner W.
    et al.
    Natural History Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark, and Hamburg, Germany.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Fish otoliths from the middle Paleocene (Selandian) of southern Sweden2021In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 143, no 2-3, p. 277-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first fossil otolith association from the middle Paleocene (Selandian) of Scania, southern Sweden is described. Forty-seven otoliths were retrieved from shallow wells representing 14 teleost taxa. Many specimens are small and/or eroded and, therefore, not identifiable to species level. Nevertheless, our findings indicate the potential for further fossil otolith discoveries in the region. The Scanian otolith-based fauna greatly resembles the better-known coeval association from Copenhagen, Denmark, but is relatively rich and diverse in perciform otoliths. The fauna records the first occurrence of Serranus? caribbaeus from the European Paleocene, and of Archaemacruroides ornatus from the Selandian of the North Sea Basin.

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  • 52.
    Slodownik, Miriam A.
    et al.
    Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University, P.O. Box 50741, SE 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden;Department of Palaeobiology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 50007, SE 104 05 Stockholm, Sweden,.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Museum of Evolution, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 16, SE 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden,.
    Reassessment of the Early Triassic trematosaurid temnospondyl Tertrema acuta from the Arctic island of Spitsbergen2021In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809, Vol. 41, no 1, article id e1900209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trematosaurids were globally distributed Early Triassic temnospondyl amphibians characterized by elongate ‘crocodile-like’ skulls. Some of the most famous trematosaurid fossils were discovered on the island of Spitsbergen in the Arctic Svalbard archipelago. Among these, the short-snouted trematosaurine, Tertrema acuta, is one of the few taxa represented by virtually complete cranial remains. Unusually, however, the type specimens comprise only natural molds that were historically used to reconstruct three-dimensional casts. Here, we re-assess these restorations using the original impressions to phylogenetically analyze and re-diagnose the taxon. Unexpectedly, our first-hand scores differ markedly from previous literature-sourced interpretations and yield conflicting tree topologies that nest T. acuta with long-snouted lonchorhynchines, thus destabilizing the long-favored sub-division of trematosaurids based on their skull shape. We attribute this result to character state conflict and suggest that the traditional classification of trematosaurids may mask more complex evolutionary relationships, as well as possible trophic partitioning, and eco-morphological plasticity.

  • 53.
    Steinthorsdottir, Margret
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University.
    Coxall, H. K.
    Bolin Centre for Climate Research Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden;Department of Geological Sciences Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden.
    de Boer, A. M.
    Bolin Centre for Climate Research Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden;Department of Geological Sciences Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden.
    Huber, M.
    Department of Earth Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences Purdue University West Lafayette IN USA.
    Barbolini, N.
    Bolin Centre for Climate Research Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden;Department of Ecology Environment and Plant Sciences Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden.
    Bradshaw, C. D.
    The Global Systems Institute University of Exeter Exeter UK;Met Office Hadley Centre Exeter UK.
    Burls, N. J.
    Department of Atmospheric Oceanic and Earth Sciences and the Center for Ocean‐Land‐Atmosphere Studies George Mason University Fairfax, VA USA.
    Feakins, S. J.
    Department of Earth Sciences University of Southern California Los Angeles CA USA.
    Gasson, E.
    School of Geographical Sciences University of Bristol Bristol UK.
    Henderiks, J.
    Department of Earth Sciences Uppsala University Uppsala Sweden.
    Holbourn, A. E.
    Institute of Geosciences Christian‐Albrechts‐University Kiel Germany.
    Kiel, S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Palaeobiology Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden;Bolin Centre for Climate Research Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden.
    Kohn, M. J.
    Department of Geosciences Boise State University Boise ID USA.
    Knorr, G.
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven Germany.
    Kürschner, W. M.
    Department of Geoscience University of Oslo Oslo Norway.
    Lear, C. H.
    School of Earth and Ocean Sciences Cardiff University Cardiff UK.
    Liebrand, D.
    MARUM – Center for Marine and Environmental Sciences University of Bremen Bremen Germany.
    Lunt, D. J.
    School of Geographical Sciences University of Bristol Bristol UK.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Pearson, P. N.
    School of Earth and Ocean Sciences Cardiff University Cardiff UK.
    Pound, M. J.
    Department of Geography and Environmental Sciences Northumbria University Newcastle upon Tyne UK.
    Stoll, H.
    Earth Science Department ETH Zürich Zürich Switzerland.
    Strömberg, C. A. E.
    Department of Biology and Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture University of Washington Seattle WA USA.
    The Miocene: The Future of the Past2021In: Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology, ISSN 2572-4517, E-ISSN 2572-4525, Vol. 36, no 4, article id e2020PA004037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Miocene epoch (23.03–5.33 Ma) was a time interval of global warmth, relative to today. Continental configurations and mountain topography transitioned toward modern conditions, and many flora and fauna evolved into the same taxa that exist today. Miocene climate was dynamic: long periods of early and late glaciation bracketed a ∼2 Myr greenhouse interval—the Miocene Climatic Optimum (MCO). Floras, faunas, ice sheets, precipitation, pCO2, and ocean and atmospheric circulation mostly (but not ubiquitously) covaried with these large changes in climate. With higher temperatures and moderately higher pCO2 (∼400–600 ppm), the MCO has been suggested as a particularly appropriate analog for future climate scenarios, and for assessing the predictive accuracy of numerical climate models—the same models that are used to simulate future climate. Yet, Miocene conditions have proved difficult to reconcile with models. This implies either missing positive feedbacks in the models, a lack of knowledge of past climate forcings, or the need for re-interpretation of proxies, which might mitigate the model-data discrepancy. Our understanding of Miocene climatic, biogeochemical, and oceanic changes on broad spatial and temporal scales is still developing. New records documenting the physical, chemical, and biotic aspects of the Earth system are emerging, and together provide a more comprehensive understanding of this important time interval. Here, we review the state-of-the-art in Miocene climate, ocean circulation, biogeochemical cycling, ice sheet dynamics, and biotic adaptation research as inferred through proxy observations and modeling studies.

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  • 54.
    UNVERFÄRTH, Jan
    et al.
    Institut für Geologie und Paläontologie, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Heisenbergstrasse 2, D-48147 Münster, Germany.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    BOMFLEUR, Benjamin
    Palynological evidence supporting widespread synchronicity of Early Jurassic silicic volcanism throughout the Transantarctic Basin2020In: Antarctic Science, ISSN 0954-1020, E-ISSN 1365-2079, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 396-397Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 55.
    van de Kamp, Thomas
    et al.
    Laboratory for Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (LAS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Schwermann, Achim H.
    LWL-Museum of Natural History, Sentruper Str. 285, 48141 Münster, Germany.
    dos Santos Rolo, Tomy
    Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-vonHelmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, German.
    Lösel, Philipp D.
    Engineering Mathematics and Computing Lab (EMCL), Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 205, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Engler, Thomas
    Steinmann Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Palaeontology, University of Bonn, Nußallee 8, 53115 Bonn, Germany.
    Etter, Walter
    Department of Geosciences, Natural History Museum Basel, Augustinergasse 2, 4051 Basel, Switzerland..
    Faragó, Tomáš
    Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-vonHelmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, German.
    Göttlicher, Jörg
    Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-vonHelmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, German.
    Heuveline, Vincent
    Engineering Mathematics and Computing Lab (EMCL), Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 205, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kopmann, Andreas
    Institute for Data Processing and Electronics (IPE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermannvon-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany.
    Mähler, Bastian
    Steinmann Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Palaeontology, University of Bonn, Nußallee 8, 53115 Bonn, Germany.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Odar, Janes
    Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-vonHelmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, German.
    Rust, Jes
    Steinmann Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Palaeontology, University of Bonn, Nußallee 8, 53115 Bonn, Germany.
    Tan Jerome, Nicholas
    Institute for Data Processing and Electronics (IPE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermannvon-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany.
    Vogelgesang, Matthias
    Institute for Data Processing and Electronics (IPE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermannvon-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany.
    Baumbach, Tilo
    Laboratory for Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (LAS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Krogmann, Lars
    Department of Entomology, State Museum of Natural History Stuttgart, Rosenstein 1, 70191 Stuttgart, Germany.
    Parasitoid biology preserved in mineralized fossils2018In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    About 50% of all animal species are considered parasites. The linkage of species diversity to a parasitic lifestyle is especially evident in the insect order Hymenoptera. However, fossil evidence for host–parasitoid interactions is extremely rare, rendering hypotheses on the evolution of parasitism assumptive. Here, using high-throughput synchrotron X-ray microtomography, we examine 1510 phosphatized fly pupae from the Paleogene of France and identify 55 parasitation events by four wasp species, providing morphological and ecological data. All species developed as solitary endoparasitoids inside their hosts and exhibit different morphological adaptations for exploiting the same hosts in one habitat. Our results allow systematic and ecological placement of four distinct endoparasitoids in the Paleogene and highlight the need to investigate ecological data preserved in the fossil record.

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  • 56.
    Vasilyan, Davit
    et al.
    JURASSICA Museum, Porrentruy, Switzerland; University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.
    Čerňanský, Andrej
    Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Szyndlar, Zbigniew
    Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków, Poland.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Amphibian and reptilian fauna from the early Miocene of Echzell, Germany2022In: Fossil Record, ISSN 1435-1943, E-ISSN 1860-1014, Fossil Record, ISSN 2193-0066, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 99-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study describes a rich amphibian and reptilian assemblage from the early Miocene locality Echzell, Germany. It consists of one allocaudate, five salamander, five frog, one gecko, chamaeleonids, anguine lizards, one lacertid, one skink and five snake taxa. The entire herpetofauna of Echzell is represented by genera and/or families very broadly known from the early Miocene of Europe. Contrary to other early Miocene herpetofaunas, the Echzell assemblage includes surprisingly only one form of crocodile-newts (Chelotriton). The Echzell Palaeobatrachus robustus represents the youngest record of the species and extends its stratigraphic range to the late early Miocene. Regarding chameleons, the frontal is partly preserved, but represents the first described frontal of the extinct species Chamaeleo andrusovi. The only anguine lizard that can be identified in the assemblage is represented by a new genus and species Smithosaurus echzellensis. Our phylogenetic analyses consistently recovered it as the sister taxon to either [Ophisauriscus quadrupes + Ophisaurus holeci] + [Anguis + Ophisaurus] (in the first analysis) or [Anguis + Ophisaurus] (in the second analysis). However, the results are based on limited fossil material – the parietal – and the support for the clade is very low. Thus, the interpretation of the Smithosaurus relationship among anguines needs to be taken with caution and has to be tested in further studies. Among snakes, Natrix longivertebrata represents the oldest record of the species and extends the stratigraphic range of this fossil snake back to the early Miocene. In addition, we provide here a broader comparison of the Echzell amphibian and reptilian assemblage with their European records for the MN3 and MN4 biostratigraphical units. Besides that, the entire herpetofauna of Echzell includes very broadly known early Miocene European forms. Remains of other groups of the same period such as Bufonidae, Hylidae, Pelodytidae, Amphisbaenia, Varanidae, Cordylidae, Pseudopus, are not found in the material available to us. We also conclude that the amphibian and reptilian fossil record across MN3–MN4 is significantly biased by taphonomic and/or environmental conditions. The amphibian and reptilian assemblage of Echzell is rich in forms living in humid and warm environments with forested areas, permanent water bodies and also some open habitats. The following climatic parameters can be reconstructed based on the herpetofauna: a mean annual temperature of 17.4–28.8 °C, minimal warm month temperature 18–28.3 °C, minimal cold month temperature 8–22.2 °C, and mean annual precipitation with a value of 791±254 mm.

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  • 57. ČERŇANSKÝ, Andrej
    et al.
    SZYNDLAR, Zbigniew
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Fossil squamate faunas from the Neogene of Hambach (northwestern Germany). Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments2016In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
12 51 - 57 of 57
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