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  • 1.
    Barani-Beiranvand, Hossein
    et al.
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Khorasan E Razavi, Mashhad, Iran..
    Aliabadian, Mansour
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Khorasan E Razavi, Mashhad, Iran.;Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Inst Appl Zool, RDZI, Mashhad, Iran..
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Darvish, Jamshid
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Khorasan E Razavi, Mashhad, Iran.;Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Inst Appl Zool, Res Dept Rodentol, Mashhad, Iran..
    Szekely, Tamas
    Univ Bath, Dept Biol & Biochem, Bath, Avon, England..
    van Dijk, Rene E.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Anim & Plant Sci, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Zool, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Phylogeny of penduline tits inferred from mitochondrial and microsatellite genotyping2017In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 932-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Penduline tits (Remiz spp.) are renowned for their diverse mating and parenting strategies, and are a well-studied system by behavioural ecologists. However, the phylogenetic relationships and species delimitations within this genus are poorly understood. Here, we investigate phylogenetic relationships within the genus Remiz by examining the genetic variation in the mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene of 64 individuals and in ten autosomal microsatellite markers from 44 individuals. The taxon sampling includes individuals from all currently recognized species (R. pendulinus, R. macronyx, R. coronatus, and R. consobrinus) and most subspecies in the Palearctic region. We showed that R. coronatus and R. consobrinus are genetically well differentiated and constitute independent evolutionary lineages, separated from each other and from R. pendulinus/macronyx. However, we found no evidence for significant differentiation among R. pendulinus/macronyx individuals in mtDNA haplotypes and only marginal differences between R. pendulinus and R. macronyx in microsatellite markers. Hence, based on present data our recommendation is to treat R. pendulinus and R. macronyx as conspecific and R. coronatus and R. consobrinus as separate species.

  • 2.
    Barani-Beiranvand, Hossein
    et al.
    Dept of Biology, Faculty of Science, Ferdowsi Univ. of Mashhad, Iran Mashhad, Khorasan-e Razavi; Mashhad Iran.
    Aliabadian, Mansour
    Dept of Biology, Faculty of Science, Ferdowsi Univ. of Mashhad, Iran Mashhad, Khorasan-e Razavi; Mashhad Iran;Research Dept of Zoological Innovation (RDZI), Inst. of Applied Zoology, Ferdowsi Univ. of Mashhad; Mashhad Iran.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Dept of Bioinformatics and Genetics, Swedish Museum of Natural History; Stockholm Sweden.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.
    Darvish, Jamshid
    Research Dept of Rodentology, Inst. of Applied Zoology, Ferdowsi Univ. of Mashhad; Mashhad Iran.
    Székely, Tamás
    Dept of Biology and Biochemistry, Univ. of Bath; Bath UK.
    Van Dijk, René E.
    Dept of Animal and Plant Sciences, Univ. of Sheffield; Sheffield UK.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Phylogeny of penduline tits inferred from mitochondrial and microsatellite genotyping2017In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 932-940Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    The skeletal evidence for a sister-group relationship of anseriform and galliform birds - A critical evaluation1996In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 195-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The osteological basis for the proposed close phylogenetical relationship of anseriform and galliform birds is evaluated and found to be very weak. Out of eleven postulated synapomorphies in cranial morphology (Cracraft 1988), three must be excluded since they express variation that is already covered by any of the other eleven characters. Another six of the postulated synapomorhies either cannot be verified to occur in most anseriforms and galliforms, or have a wide distribution outside this group. A re-analysis of the combined morphological and biochemical data set of Cracraft and Mindell (1989) with the questionable osteological characters excluded, does not corroborate an anseriform-galliform sister-group relationship, but leaves the Neognathae unresolved.

  • 4.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Evolution, biogeography, and patterns of diversification in passerine birds2003In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 3-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper summarizes and discusses the many new insights into passerine evolution gained from an increased general interest in avian evolution among biologists, and particularly from the extensive use of DNA sequence data in phylogenetic reconstruction. The sister group relationship between the New Zealand rifleman and all other passerines, indicates the importance of the former southern supercontinent Gondwana in the earliest evolution of this group. Following the break-up of Gondwana, the ancestors of other major passerine groups became isolated in Australia (oscines), South America (New World suboscines), and possibly, the then connected Kerguelen Plateau/India/Madagascar tectonic plates (Old World suboscines). The oscines underwent a significant radiation in the Australo-Papuan region and only a few oscine lineages have spread further than to the nearby Southeast Asia. A remarkable exception is the ancestor to the vast Passerida radiation, which now comprises 35% of all bird species. This group obviously benefitted greatly from the increased diversity in plant seed size and morphology during the Tertiary. The lyrebirds (and possibly scrub-birds) constitute the sister group to all other oscines, which renders “Corvida” (sensu Sibley and Ahlquist 1990) paraphyletic. Sequence data suggests that Passerida, the other clade of oscines postulated based on the results of DNA–DNA hybridizations, is monophyletic, and that the rockfowl and rock-jumpers are the most basal members of this clade. The suboscines in the Old World (Eurylamides) and the New World (Tyrannides), respectively, are sister groups. A provisional, working classification of the passerines is presented based on the increased understanding of the major patterns of passerine evolution.

  • 5.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Jansén, Anna-Lee
    Stockholms universitet.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ekman, Jan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Inter-generic relationships of the crows, jays, magpies and allied groups (Aves: Corvidae) based on nucleotide sequence data2005In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 222-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships were studied based on DNA sequences obtained from all recognized genera of the family Corvidae sensu stricto. The aligned data set consists 2589 bp obtained from one mitochondrial and two nuclear genes. Maximum parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and Bayesian inference analyses were used to estimate phylogenetic relationships. The analyses were done for each gene separately, as well as for all genes combined. An analysis of a taxonomically expanded data set of cytochrome b sequences was performed in order to infer the phylogenetic positions of six genera for which nuclear genes could not be obtained. Monophyly of the Corvidae is supported by all analyses, as well as by the occurrence of a deletion of 16 bp in the β-fibrinogen intron in all ingroup taxa. Temnurus and Pyrrhocorax are placed as the sister group to all other corvids, while Cissa and Urocissa appear as the next clade inside them. Further up in the tree, two larger and well-supported clades of genera were recovered by the analyses. One has an entirely New World distribution (the New World jays), while the other includes mostly Eurasian (and one African) taxa. Outside these two major clades are Cyanopica and Perisoreus whose phylogenetic positions could not be determined by the present data. A biogeographic analysis of our data suggests that the Corvidae underwent an initial radiation in Southeast Asia. This is consistent with the observation that almost all basal clades in the phylogenetic tree consist of species adapted to tropical and subtropical forest habitats.

  • 6. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Batalha-Filho, Henrique
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Rapid expansion and diversification into new niche space by fluvicoline flycatchers2018In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 49, article id jav-01661Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Fransson, Thord
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Karlsson, Måns
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Stach, Robert
    Barboutis, Christos
    Inability to regain normal body mass despite extensive refuelling in great reed warblers following the trans-Sahara crossing during spring migration2017In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 48, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 8. Fuchs, Jerome
    et al.
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Pasquet, Eric
    Molecular phylogeny and biogeographic history of the piculets (Piciformes: Picumninae)2006In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 487-496Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hedlund, Johanna
    et al.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Jakobsson, Sven
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Long-term phenological shifts and intra-specific differences inmigratory change in the willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus).2015In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 97-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Evolution of the ovenbird-woodcreeper assemblage(Aves: Furnariidae) - major shifts in nest architecture and adaptive radiation2006In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 260-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neotropical ovenbirds (Furnariidae) form an extraordinary morphologically and ecologically diverse passerine radiation, which includes many examples of species that are superficially similar to other passerine birds as a resulting from their adaptations to similar lifestyles. The ovenbirds further exhibits a truly remarkable variation in nest types, arguably approaching that found in the entire passerine clade. Herein we present a genus-level phylogeny of ovenbirds based on both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA including a more complete taxon sampling than in previous molecular studies of the group. The phylogenetic results are in good agreement with earlier molecular studies of ovenbirds, and supports the suggestion that Geositta and Sclerurus form the sister clade to both core-ovenbirds and woodcreepers. Within the core-ovenbirds several relationships that are incongruent with traditional classifications are suggested. Among other things, the philydorine ovenbirds are found to be non-monophyletic. The mapping of principal nesting strategies onto the molecular phylogeny suggests cavity nesting to be plesiomorphic within the ovenbird–woodcreeper radiation. It is also suggested that the shift from cavity nesting to building vegetative nests is likely to have happened at least three times during the evolution of the group. We suggest that the shifts in nest architecture within the furnariine and synallaxine ovenbirds have served as an ecological release that has facilitated diversification into new habitats and new morphological specializations.

  • 11.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogenetic relationships of woodcreepers (Aves: Dendrocolaptinae) – incongruence between molecular and morphological data2004In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 280-288-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The woodcreepers is a highly specialized lineage within the New World suboscine radiation. Most systematic studies of higher level relationships of this group rely on morphological characters, and few studies utilizing molecular data exist. In this paper, we present a molecular phylogeny of the major lineages of woodcreepers (Aves: Dendrocolaptinae), based on nucleotide sequence data from a nuclear non-coding gene region (myoglobin intron II) and a protein-coding mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b). A good topological agreement between the individual gene trees suggests that the resulting phylogeny reflects the true evolutionary history of woodcreepers well. However, the DNA-based phylogeny conflicts with the results of a parsimony analysis of morphological characters. The topological differences mainly concern the basal branches of the trees. The morphological data places the genus Drymornis in a basal position (mainly supported by characters in the hindlimb), while our data suggests it to be derived among woodcreepers. Unlike most other woodcreepers, Drymornis is ground-adapted, as are the ovenbirds. The observed morphological similarities between Drymornis and the ovenbird outgroup may thus be explained with convergence or with reversal to an ancestral state. This observation raises the question of the use of characters associated with locomotion and feeding in phylogenetic reconstruction based on parsimony.

  • 12.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Parsons, Thomas J.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogeny of major lineages of suboscines (Passeriformes) analysed by nuclear DNA sequence data2001In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 15-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships among major groups of passeriform birds were studied by analyses of nucleotide sequence data from two nuclear genes, c-myc and RAG-1. The results corroborated both the monophyly of the order Passeriformes, and the major dichotomy into oscine and suboscine passerines previously suggested based on syringeal morphology and DNA-DNA hybridizations. The representatives of the Old World suboscines (families Eurylaimidae, Philepittidae and Pittidae) formed a monophyletic clade. The New World suboscines clustered into two clades. The first contained Conopophaga (Conopophagidae), Furnarius (Furnariidae), Lepidocolaptes (Dendrocolaptidae), Thamnophilus (Formicariidae), and Rhinocrypta (Rhinocryptidae). Previously, the monophyly of this group has been inferred from their possession of a unique, "tracheophone" syrinx, and from DNA-DNA hybridisation data. The second clade of New World suboscines includes Gubernetes and Muscivora (Tyrannidae), Phytotoma (Phytotomidae), Tityra (Cotingidae) and Pipra (Pipridae). This group of families have been considered monophyletic based on morphology (although ambiguously) and DNA-DNA hybridisation. The sister group relationship of Tityra and Phytotoma supports the previously supposed cotingid affinity of Phytotoma. Nuclear DNA data also unambiguously group the lyrebirds Menura with the oscines. The presented results from the analysis of nuclear DNA agree well with morphology and DNA-DNA hybridisation data. The precise age of the divergences studied herein are unknown but based on interpretations of the fossil record of passerine birds many of them might date back to the early Tertiary. The agreement between data from the nuclear DNA and other sources, along with the fact that neither of the studied genes showed sign of saturation, indicate the great potential of these two nuclear genes to resolve very old divergences in birds.

  • 13.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Molecular support for a sister group relationship between Pici and Galbulae (Piciformes sensu Wetmore 1960)2003In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 185-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Woodpeckers, honeyguides, barbets, and toucans form a well-supported clade with approximately 355 species. This clade, commonly referred to as Pici, share with the South American clade Galbulae (puffbirds and jacamars) a zygodactyls foot with a unique arrangement of the deep flexor tendons (Gadow's Type VI). Based on these characters, Pici and Galbulae are often considered sister taxa, and have in traditional classification been placed in the order Piciformes. There are, however, a wealth of other morphological characters that contradicts this association, and indicates that Pici is closer related to the Passeriformes (passerines) than to Galbulae. Galbulae, in turn, is considered more closely related to the rollers and ground-rollers (Coracii). In this study, we evaluate these two hypotheses by using DNA sequence data from exons of the nuclear RAG-1 and c-myc genes, and an intron of the nuclear myoglobin gene, totally including 3400 basepairs of aligned sequences. The results indicate a sister group relationship between Pici and Galbulae, i.e. monophyly of the Piciformes, and this association has high statistical support in terms of bootstrap values and posterior probabilities. This study also supports several associations within the traditional order Coraciiformes, including a sister group relationship between the kingfishers (Alcedinidae) and a clade with todies (Todidae) and motmots (Momotidae), and with the bee-eaters (Meropidae) placed basal relative to these three groups.

  • 14.
    Li, Xinlei
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Inst. of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Kunming 650223 China;Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences; Beijing 100049 China.
    Dong, Feng
    State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Inst. of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Kunming 650223 China.
    Lei, Fumin
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Inst. of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Beijing 100101 China.
    Alström, Per
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Inst. of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Beijing 100101 China;Swedish Species Information Centre, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences; SE-750 07 Uppsala Sweden.
    Zhang, Ruiying
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Inst. of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Beijing 100101 China.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Dept of Animal Ecology; Uppsala Univ.; Norbyvägen 18D SE-752 36 Uppsala Sweden.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, Natural History Museum of Denmark, Univ. of Copenhagen; Universitetsparken 15 DK-2100 Copenhagen Denmark.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Zou, Fasheng
    South China Inst. of Endangered Animals; Guangzhou 510260 China.
    Yang, Xiaojun
    State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Inst. of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Kunming 650223 China.
    Shaped by uneven Pleistocene climate: mitochondrial phylogeographic pattern and population history of white wagtailMotacilla alba(Aves: Passeriformes)2015In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 263-274Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Stach, Robert
    et al.
    Dept of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Jakobsson, Sven
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Wide ranging stopover movements and substantial fuelling in first year garden warblers at a northern stopover site.2015In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 45, no 7, p. 315-322Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 15 of 15
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