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  • 1.
    Abalde, Samuel
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    MATEdb: a new phylogenomic-driven database for Metazoa2022Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 2.
    Abalde, Samuel
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Crocetta, Fabio
    Department of Integrative Marine Ecology (EMI), Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, I-80121 Napoli, Italy.
    Tenorio, Manuel J.
    Departamento CMIM y Q. Inorgánica-INBIO, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.
    D'Aniello, Salvatore
    Department of Biology and Evolution of Marine Organisms (BEOM), Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, I-80121 Napoli, Italy.
    Fassio, Giulia
    Department of Biology and Biotechnologies “Charles Darwin”, Sapienza University of Rome, Zoology–Viale dell’Università 32, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Rodríguez-Flores, Paula C.
    Museum of Comparative Zoology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.
    Uribe, Juan E.
    Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain.
    Afonso, Carlos M.L.
    Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR), Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005 - 139 Faro, Portugal.
    Oliverio, Marco
    Department of Biology and Biotechnologies “Charles Darwin”, Sapienza University of Rome, Zoology–Viale dell’Università 32, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Zardoya, Rafael
    Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain.
    Hidden species diversity and mito-nuclear discordance within the Mediterranean cone snail, Lautoconus ventricosus2023In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 186, p. 107838-107838, article id 107838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mediterranean cone snail, Lautoconus ventricosus, is currently considered a single species inhabiting the whole Mediterranean basin and the adjacent Atlantic coasts. Yet, no population genetic study has assessed its taxonomic status. Here, we collected 245 individuals from 75 localities throughout the Mediterranean Sea and used cox1 barcodes, complete mitochondrial genomes, and genome skims to test whether L. ventricosus represents a complex of cryptic species. The maximum likelihood phylogeny based on complete mitochondrial genomes recovered six main clades (hereby named blue, brown, green, orange, red, and violet) with sufficient sequence divergence to be considered putative species. On the other hand, phylogenomic analyses based on 437 nuclear genes only recovered four out of the six clades: blue and orange clades were thoroughly mixed and the brown one was not recovered. This mito-nuclear discordance revealed instances of incomplete lineage sorting and introgression, and may have caused important differences in the dating of main cladogenetic events. Species delimitation tests proposed the existence of at least three species: green, violet, and red + blue + orange (i.e., cyan). Green plus cyan (with sympatric distributions) and violet, had West and East Mediterranean distributions, respectively, mostly separated by the Siculo-Tunisian biogeographical barrier. Morphometric analyses of the shell using species hypotheses as factor and shell length as covariate showed that the discrimination power of the studied parameters was only 70.2%, reinforcing the cryptic nature of the uncovered species, and the importance of integrative taxonomic approaches considering morphology, ecology, biogeography, and mitochondrial and nuclear population genetic variation.

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  • 3.
    Abalde, Samuel
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Dutertre, Sébastien
    IBMM, Université de Montpellier CNRS.
    Zardoya, Rafael
    Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales.
    A Combined Transcriptomics and Proteomics Approach Reveals the Differences in the Predatory and Defensive Venoms of the Molluscivorous Cone Snail Cylinder ammiralis (Caenogastropoda: Conidae)2021In: Toxins, ISSN 2072-6651, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 642-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Venoms are complex mixtures of proteins that have evolved repeatedly in the animal kingdom. Cone snail venoms represent one of the best studied venom systems. In nature, this venom can be dynamically adjusted depending on its final purpose, whether to deter predators or hunt prey. Here, the transcriptome of the venom gland and the proteomes of the predation-evoked and defensive venoms of the molluscivorous cone snail Cylinder ammiralis were catalogued. A total of 242 venom-related transcripts were annotated. The conotoxin superfamilies presenting more different peptides were O1, O2, T, and M, which also showed high expression levels (except T). The three precursors of the J superfamily were also highly expressed. The predation-evoked and defensive venoms showed a markedly distinct profile. A total of 217 different peptides were identified, with half of them being unique to one venom. A total of 59 peptides ascribed to 23 different protein families were found to be exclusive to the predatory venom, including the cono-insulin, which was, for the first time, identified in an injected venom. A total of 43 peptides from 20 protein families were exclusive to the defensive venom. Finally, comparisons of the relative abundance (in terms of number of peptides) of the different conotoxin precursor superfamilies showed that most of them present similar abundance regardless of the diet.

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  • 4.
    Abalde, Samuel
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Tellgren-Roth, Christian
    Heintz, Julia
    Vinnere Pettersson, Olga
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The draft genome of the microscopic Nemertoderma westbladi sheds light on the evolution of Acoelomorpha genomes2023In: Frontiers in Genetics, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 14, article id 1244493Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Adedidran, Funmilola
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A draft transcriptome of a parasite Neocamacolaimus parasiticus (Camacolaimidae, Plectida)2021In: Journal of Nematology, E-ISSN 0022-300X, article id e2021Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Harper Adams University.
    Back, Matthew
    Prior, Thomas
    Karssen, Gerrit
    Lawson, Rebecca
    Adams, Ian
    Sapp, Melanie
    Metabarcoding of soil nematodes: the importance of taxonomiccoverage and availability of reference sequences in choosingsuitable marker(s)2019In: Metabarcoding and Metagenomics, Vol. 3, p. 77-99Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 7.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Revision of the genus Cobbionema Filipjev, 1922 (Nematoda, Chromadorida, Selachinematidae)2020In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 702, p. 1-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the genus Cobbionema Filipjev, 1922 in Sweden with the description of four species and a revision of the genus. Cobbionema acrocerca Filipjev, 1922 is relatively small in size, with a tail that has a conical proximal and a digitate distal section. Cobbionema cylindrolaimoides Schuurmans Stekhoven, 1950 is similar to C. acrocerca in most characters except having a larger body size and heavily cuticularized mandibles. Cobbionema brevispicula sp. nov. is characterised by short spicules and a conoid tail. Cobbionema acuminata sp. nov. is characterised by a long two-part spicule, a conical tail and three (one mid dorsal and two ventrosublateral) sharply pointed tines in the anterior chamber of the stoma that are located more anterior than in all the other species. We also present a molecular phylogeny of the family based on the nearly full-length 18S and the D2-D3 expansion segment of the 28S rRNA genes. Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian trees inferred from both genes strongly support a clade that included Cobbionema, Demonema Cobb, 1894 and Halichoanolaimus de Man, 1888 and another clade with Gammanema Cobb, 1920 and Latronema Wieser, 1954 nested together. None of the trees supported the monophyly of the subfamilies Choniolaiminae and Selachinematinae.

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  • 8.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rik rundmaskfauna i Store Mosse nationalpark hittades med DNA-metastreckkodning2023In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 118, no 2, article id 24-33Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 9.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description of a new marine predatory nematode Latronema dyngi sp. nov. (Nematoda, Chromadorida, Selachinematidae) from the west coast of Sweden and an updated phylogeny of Chromadoria2020In: Marine Biodiversity, ISSN 1867-1616, E-ISSN 1867-1624, Vol. 50, no 113, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new nematode species, Latronema dyngi sp. nov., is described from Skagerrak off the west coast of Sweden with the type locality near Dyngö island. Latronema dyngi sp. nov. is characterized by multispiral amphideal fovea with circular outline, 0.2– 0.3 corresponding body diameters wide in males and 0.1–0.2 corresponding body diameters wide in females, 12 cuticular longitudinal ridges and 18–27 precloacal supplements in males. Latronema dyngi sp. nov. most closely resembles L. orcinum in terms of body length; demanian ratios a, b, c and c′; number of amphid turns in males; and the ratio of spicule length to cloacal body diameter. The two species can be differentiated by the number longitudinal ridges on the cuticle (12 for Latronema dyngi sp. nov. vs 20–22 for L. orcinum) and spicule length (65–78 μm for L. dyngi vs 60 for L. orcinum) and shape (weakly arcuate for L. dyngi sp. nov. vs strongly arcuate for L. orcinum). We also performed a maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis on over 250 nematodes of the subclass Chromadoria based on their nearly full-length 18S rDNA sequences. In agreement with previous studies, our analysis supported Selachinematidae as a monophyletic group and placed Richtersia Steiner, 1916 within Desmodoridae Filipjev, 1922 or just outside of the main Desmodorida clade with the latter placement not well supported.

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  • 10.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Twenty Years after De Ley and Blaxter—How Far Did We Progress in Understanding the Phylogeny of the Phylum Nematoda?2021In: Animals, E-ISSN 2076-2615, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 3479-3479Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Roberts, Nickellaus G.
    Adediran, Funmilola
    Smythe, Ashleigh B.
    Kocot, Kevin M.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Phylogenomic Analysis of the Phylum Nematoda: Conflicts and Congruences With Morphology, 18S rRNA, and Mitogenomes2022In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 9, article id 769565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships within many lineages of the phylum Nematoda remainunresolved, despite numerous morphology-based and molecular analyses. Weperformed several phylogenomic analyses using 286 published genomes andtranscriptomes and 19 new transcriptomes by focusing on Trichinellida, Spirurina,Rhabditina, and Tylenchina separately, and by analyzing a selection of species fromthe whole phylum Nematoda. The phylogeny of Trichinellida supported the divisionof Trichinella into encapsulated and non-encapsulated species and placed them assister to Trichuris. The Spirurina subtree supported the clades formed by species fromAscaridomorpha and Spiruromorpha respectively, but did not support Dracunculoidea.The analysis of Tylenchina supported a clade that included all sampled species fromTylenchomorpha and placed it as sister to clades that included sampled speciesfrom Cephalobomorpha and Panagrolaimomorpha, supporting the hypothesis thatpostulates the single origin of the stomatostylet. The Rhabditina subtree placed a cladecomposed of all sampled species from Diplogastridae as sister to a lineage consistingof paraphyletic Rhabditidae, a single representative of Heterorhabditidae and a cladecomposed of sampled species belonging to Strongylida. It also strongly supportedall suborders within Strongylida. In the phylum-wide analysis, a clade composedof all sampled species belonging to Enoplia were consistently placed as sister toDorylaimia + Chromadoria. The topology of the Nematoda backbone was consistentwith previous studies, including polyphyletic placement of sampled representatives ofMonhysterida and Araeolaimida.

  • 12.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Slos, Dieter
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Assessing the diversity of nematodes in the Store Mosse National Park (Sweden) using metabarcoding2024In: Metabarcoding and Metagenomics, E-ISSN 2534-9708, Vol. 8, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. ALARIE, YVES
    et al.
    MICHAT, MARIANO C.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    HÁJEK, JIŘÍ
    Morphology of the larvae of Rhantaticus congestus (Klug, 1833) and phylogenetic comparison with other known Aciliini (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Dytiscinae)2023In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5380, no 3, p. 247-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the second- and third instar larvae of the diving beetle Rhantaticus congestus (Klug, 1833), including detailed morphometric and chaetotaxic analyses of the cephalic capsule, head appendages, legs, terminal abdominal segment and urogomphi in order to discover useful characters for distinguishing Rhantaticus Sharp, 1882 larvae from those of other known Aciliini (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Dytiscinae). A parsimony analysis based on 94 larval characteristics of nine Aciliini species in five genera (Acilius Leach, 1817, Graphoderus Dejean, 1833, Rhantaticus, Sandracottus Sharp, 1882, Thermonectus Dejean, 1833) was conducted using the program TNT. Rhantaticus shares with all these genera several larval character states which support its inclusion in the Aciliini. Whereas Rhantaticus larva stands out from other known genera by several unique character states, our parsimony analysis did not recover any clear phylogenetic position of this genus within the Aciliini.

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  • 14. ALARIE, YVES
    et al.
    MICHAT, MARIANO C.
    RANARILALATIANA, TOLOTRA
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Larval morphology of the Madagascan endemic diving beetle genus Hovahydrus Biström, 1982 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) and phylogenetic comparison with other known Hyphydrini2022In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5219, no 3, p. 227-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe for the first time the instar III larva of the diving beetle genus Hovahydrus Biström, 1982, based on H. praetextus (Guignot, 1951) and a new species yet to be described (identified here as Hovahydrus sp. near H. minutissimus (Régimbart, 1903)). We include detailed morphometric and chaetotaxic analyses of the cephalic capsule, head appendages, legs, last abdominal segment and urogomphi in order to discover useful characters for distinguishing Hovahydrus larvae from those of other known Hyphydrini (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Hydroporinae). A provisional parsimony analysis based on larval characteristics of 11 Hyphydrini species in eight genera was conducted using the program TNT. Larval morphology supports a close relationship between Hovahydrus, Hyphydrus Illiger, 1802, and the endemic South Africa genera Andex Sharp, 1882, Coelhydrus Sharp, 1882, Darwinhydrus Sharp, 1882 and Primospes Sharp, 1882. 

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  • 15. ALIPANAH, HELEN
    et al.
    ASSELBERGS, JAN
    MALM, TOBIAS
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    SLAMKA, FRANTIŠEK
    Taxonomic study of the subfamily Pyraustinae (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)in Iran2023In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5289, no 1, p. 1-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sixty-seven species of the subfamily Pyraustinae from 17 genera and two tribes are listed. Anania verbascalis verbascalis ([Denis & Schiffermüller], 1949) is considered as a senior synonym of A. verbascalis parvalis (Osthelder, 1935) syn. n.; Pyrausta virginalis Duponchel, 1832 as a senior synonym of P. perkeo Amsel, 1970 syn. n.; and P. ferrealis (Hampson, 1900) as a senior synonym of P. euergestalis Amsel, 1954 syn. n. Thirteen species, namely Anania coronata (Hufnagel, 1767), A. murcialis (Ragonot, 1895), A. terrealis (Treitschke, 1829), Pyrausta ferrealis (Hampson, 1900), P. armeniaca Slamka, 2013, P. zeitunalis Caradja, 1916, P. cingulata (Linnaeus, 1758), P. delicatalis Caradja, 1916, P. tatarica Kemal et al., 2020, Loxostege sedakowialis (Eversmann, 1852), L. wagneri Zerny in Wagner, 1929, L. mucosalis (Herrich-Schäffer, 1848) and L. peltaloides (Rebel in Wagner, 1932), are newly reported from Iran. Additionally, a redescription of the male of P. delicatalis and the female of L. sedakowialis, as well as description of the hitherto unknown female of P. delicatalis are presented. The intraspecific variations of the species if present are discussed and additional new diagnostic characters to separate the closely related species are presented. Data on the geographical distribution of the Iranian species of this subfamily are provided.

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  • 16.
    Alipanah, Helen
    et al.
    Iranian Research Institute of Plant Protection (IRIPP).
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Asselbergs, Jan
    A new species of Sitochroa Hübner, 1825 (Lepidoptera, Crambidae, Pyraustinae) from Iran, with taxonomic notes on the genus2020In: Nota lepidopterologica, ISSN 0342-7536, Vol. 43, p. 61-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sitochroa urmiensis sp. nov. is described based on a single male collected in West Azarbaijan Province, Iran. Sitochroa palealis (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775) is considered as a senior synonym of Loxostege farsalis Amsel, 1950 syn. nov. Loxostege malekalis Amsel, 1950 is transferred to the genus Sitochroa Hübner, as S. malekalis (Amsel, 1950) comb. nov. And the hitherto unknown female of S. malekalis is described and illustrated.

  • 17. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Höhna, Sebastian
    Gelang, Magnus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Olsson, Urban
    Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset.2011In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 11, p. 352-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The avian family Cettiidae, including the genera Cettia, Urosphena, Tesia, Abroscopus and Tickellia and Orthotomus cucullatus, has recently been proposed based on analysis of a small number of loci and species. The close relationship of most of these taxa was unexpected, and called for a comprehensive study based on multiple loci and dense taxon sampling. In the present study, we infer the relationships of all except one of the species in this family using one mitochondrial and three nuclear loci. We use traditional gene tree methods (Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood bootstrapping, parsimony bootstrapping), as well as a recently developed Bayesian species tree approach (*BEAST) that accounts for lineage sorting processes that might produce discordance between gene trees. We also analyse mitochondrial DNA for a larger sample, comprising multiple individuals and a large number of subspecies of polytypic species.

    RESULTS: There are many topological incongruences among the single-locus trees, although none of these is strongly supported. The multi-locus tree inferred using concatenated sequences and the species tree agree well with each other, and are overall well resolved and well supported by the data. The main discrepancy between these trees concerns the most basal split. Both methods infer the genus Cettia to be highly non-monophyletic, as it is scattered across the entire family tree. Deep intraspecific divergences are revealed, and one or two species and one subspecies are inferred to be non-monophyletic (differences between methods).

    CONCLUSIONS: The molecular phylogeny presented here is strongly inconsistent with the traditional, morphology-based classification. The remarkably high degree of non-monophyly in the genus Cettia is likely to be one of the most extraordinary examples of misconceived relationships in an avian genus. The phylogeny suggests instances of parallel evolution, as well as highly unequal rates of morphological divergence in different lineages. This complex morphological evolution apparently misled earlier taxonomists. These results underscore the well-known but still often neglected problem of basing classifications on overall morphological similarity. Based on the molecular data, a revised taxonomy is proposed. Although the traditional and species tree methods inferred much the same tree in the present study, the assumption by species tree methods that all species are monophyletic is a limitation in these methods, as some currently recognized species might have more complex histories.

  • 18. Andersen, Trond
    et al.
    Hansen, Lars Ove
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sagvolden, Björn
    Faunistical records of Caddis flies (Trichoptera) from Buskerud, South Norway1993In: Fauna norvegica Serie B, Vol. 40, p. 49-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Andersen, Trond
    et al.
    Hansen, Lars Ove
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Solhöy, Torstein
    Söli, Geir
    Faunistical records of Caddis flies (Trichoptera) from Aust-Agder and Vest-Agder, South Norway1990In: Fauna norvegica Serie B, Vol. 37, p. 23-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20. Andersen, Trond
    et al.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Caddis flies (Trichoptera) from a mountain rain forest in NE Tanzania1993In: Caddis flies (Trichoptera) from a mountain rain forest in NE Tanzania / [ed] Otto, The Hague: Junk , 1993, p. 59-64Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21. Andersen, Trond
    et al.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kobro, Sverre
    Ligaard, S
    Faunistical records of Caddis flies (Trichoptera) from Østfold and Akershus, SE Norway1993In: Fauna norvegica Serie B, Vol. 40, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Appeltans, Ward
    et al.
    Ahyong, Shane T.
    Anderson, Gary
    Angel, Martin V.
    Artois, Tom
    Bailly, Nicolas
    Bamber, Roger
    Barber, Anthony
    Bartsch, Ilse
    Berta, Annalisa
    Błażewicz-Paszkowycz, Magdalena
    Bock, Phil
    Boxshall, Geoff
    Boyko, Christopher B.
    Brandão, Simone Nunes
    Bray, Rod A.
    Bruce, Niel L.
    Cairns, Stephen D.
    Chan, Tin-Yam
    Cheng, Lanna
    Collins, Allen G.
    Cribb, Thomas
    Curini-Galletti, Marco
    Dahdouh-Guebas, Farid
    Davie, Peter J.F.
    Dawson, Michael N.
    De Clerck, Olivier
    Decock, Wim
    De Grave, Sammy
    de Voogd, Nicole J.
    Domning, Daryl P.
    Emig, Christian C.
    Erséus, Christer
    Eschmeyer, William
    Fauchald, Kristian
    Fautin, Daphne G.
    Feist, Stephen W.
    Fransen, Charles H.J.M.
    Furuya, Hidetaka
    Garcia-Alvarez, Oscar
    Gerken, Sarah
    Gibson, David
    Gittenberger, Arjan
    Gofas, Serge
    Gómez-Daglio, Liza
    Gordon, Dennis P.
    Guiry, Michael D.
    Hernandez, Francisco
    Hoeksema, Bert W.
    Hopcroft, Russell R.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The Magnitude of Global Marine Species Diversity2012In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 22, no 23, p. 2189-2202Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Artedi, Peter
    Alli, H (Author of afterword, colophon, etc.)
    Broberg, G (Author of afterword, colophon, etc.)
    Christensson, J (Author of afterword, colophon, etc.)
    Kullander, Sven (Author of afterword, colophon, etc.)
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. FishBase.
    Strandberg, C.-O. (Author of afterword, colophon, etc.)
    Alli, H. (Translator)
    Ichthyologia2022Book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    A taxonomic review and revisions of Microstomidae (Platyhelminthes: Macrostomorpha)2019In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0212073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microstomidae (Platyhelminthes: Macrostomorpha) diversity has been almost entirely ignored within recent years, likely due to inconsistent and often old taxonomic literature and a general rarity of sexually mature collected specimens. Herein, we reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of the group using both previously published and new 18S and CO1 gene sequences. We present some taxonomic revisions of Microstomidae and further describe 8 new species of Microstomum based on both molecular and morphological evidence. Finally, we briefly review the morphological taxonomy of each species and provide a key to aid in future research and identification that is not dependent on reproductive morphology. Our goal is to clarify the taxonomy and facilitate future research into an otherwise very understudied group of tiny (but important) flatworms.

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  • 25.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    Biodiversity between sand grains: Meiofauna composition across southern and western Sweden assessed by metabarcoding2020In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 8, article id e51813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The meiofauna is an important part of the marine ecosystem, but its composition and distribution patterns are relatively unexplored. Here we assessed the biodiversity and community structure of meiofauna from five locations on the Swedish western and southern coasts using a high-throughput DNA sequencing (metabarcoding) approach. The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (COI) mini-barcode and nuclear 18S small ribosomal subunit (18S) V1-V2 region were amplified and sequenced using Illumina MiSeq technology. Our analyses revealed a higher number of species than previously found in other areas: thirteen samples comprising 6.5 dm3 sediment revealed 708 COI and 1,639 18S metazoan OTUs. Across all sites, the majority of the metazoan biodiversity was assigned to ArthropodaNematoda and Platyhelminthes. Alpha and beta diversity measurements showed that community composition differed significantly amongst sites. OTUs initially assigned to AcoelaGastrotricha and the two Platyhelminthes sub-groups Macrostomorpha and Rhabdocoela were further investigated and assigned to species using a phylogeny-based taxonomy approach. Our results demonstrate that there is great potential for discovery of new meiofauna species even in some of the most extensively studied locations.

  • 26.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Microstomum (Platyhelminthes, Macrostomorpha, Microstomidae) from the Swedish west coast: two new species and a population description2018In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, no 398, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology, Systematics and Evolution, Stockholm Universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology, NaturhiDepartment of Zoology, Systematics and Evolution, Stockholm Universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phylogenetic assessment and systematic revision of the acoel family Isodiametridae2021In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Wide distributions and cryptic diversity within a Microstomum (Platyhelminthes) species complex2018In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 47, p. 486-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microstomum lineare is a common species of fresh and brackish waters found world-wide. Three genes (18S, CO1 and ITS) were sequenced from specimens of M. lineare collected from four countries, and the levels of cryptic diversity and genetic structuring were assessed. Results showed M. lineare has very wide haplotype distributions suggesting higher than expected dispersal capabilities. In addition, three new species were described on the basis of molecular taxonomy: Microstomum artoisi sp. nov., Microstomum tchaikovskyi sp. nov. and Microstomum zicklerorum sp. nov.

  • 29.
    Balke, Michael
    et al.
    Zoologische Staatssammlung München.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hendrich, Lars
    Zoologische Staatssammlung München.
    A new genus and two new species of Southeast Asian Bidessini as well as new synonyms for Oceanian species (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae)2017In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 647, p. 137-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rompindessus jenisi Balke, Bergsten & Hendrich, gen. n. et sp. n. is described from near Rompin village in West Malaysia. The new genus is characterized by the presence of an occipital line and basal pronotal striae, the presence of a thick anterior bead on clypeus and two-segmented parameres as well as by the absence of basal elytral striae, the absence of sutural line on elytron, the absence of basal epipleural transverse carina, and the absence of longitudinal elytral carina. Moreover, male pro- and mesotarsus appear stout, and distinctly dilated laterally; the pronotum is comparably long and parallel-sided and the colour of beetle conspicuous dark orange. Leiodytes kualalipis Balke, Wang, Bergsten & Hendrich, sp. n. is described from West Malaysia (Pahang) and South Vietnam (Cat Tien). It is well characterized by its large size, elongate body and the form of the median lobe. Limbodessus fijiensis (J. Balfour-Browne, 1944), comb. n. described from Fiji is a new synonym of Limbodessus curviplicatus (Zimmermann, 1927) described from Samoa.

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  • 30.
    Balog, Luca Eszter
    et al.
    Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Török, Júlia Katalin
    Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Redescription of an insect-associated nematode, Reiterina typica (Stefański, 1922) Sudhaus, 2011 (Rhabditida: Rhabditidae) found in scarab grubs in Hungary2023In: Nematology (Leiden. Print), ISSN 1388-5545, E-ISSN 1568-5411, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 699-712Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31. Balog, Luca Eszter
    et al.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Török, Julia Katalin
    PREVALENCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF DIFFERENT NATURAL ENEMIES IN THE HARLEQUIN LADYBIRD HARMONIA AXYRIDIS (COLEOPTERA COCCINELLIDAE)2021In: Redia, E-ISSN 0370-4327, article id General Agricultural and Biological SciencesArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Bartsch, Hans
    et al.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Dyster svävfluga åter i farten i Dalarna2007In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 50-54Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Villa occulata was found in a bog in the province of Dalarna, Sweden in 2005 and 2006. Extended search for the species in 2007 showed it to be regularly present in similar mires in the same area. This indicates that the species is resident in Sweden and opens the possibility for further studies of its poorly known distribution and biology. The species seems to be confined to bogs which may explain why it has gone largely unnoticed. The paper summarizes the present state of knowledge.

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  • 33.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A bee-fly's host, Facebook, and DNA Barcoding.2016In: Barcode Bulletin, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Coleoptera: Haliplidae, crawling water beetles2022In: The new natural history of Madagascar / [ed] Steven M. Goodman, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022, 1, p. 1041-1043Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Coleoptera: Hydroscaphidae, skiff beetles2022In: The new natural history of Madagascar / [ed] Steven M. Goodman, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022, 1, p. 1050-1051Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Coleoptera: Torridincolidae, torrent beetles2022In: The New Natural History of Madagascar / [ed] Steven M. Goodman, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022, 1, p. 1047-1049Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    DNA-streckkodning - så går det till2014In: Bi-lagan, no 1, p. 14-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 38.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bjelke, Ulf
    Bergsten, J. & Bjelke U. 2018. Digital illustrerad bestämningsnyckel till Sveriges skräddare. I: Artnyckeln. ArtDatabanken, SLU, Uppsala. https://www.artnyckeln.se/type/gerridae-2000939-fullvuxna-skraddare.2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Elmqvist, Håkan
    Distoleon tetragrammicus (Fabricius, 1798) ny myrlejonslända för Norden och en illustrerad nyckel till arterna (Neuroptera: Myrmeleontidae).2022In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 143, no 1-2, p. 25-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the first finding of the antlion Distoleon tetragrammicus (Fabricius, 1798) fromSweden. Several adults of the species have been collected or photographed on the island ofGotland in the Baltic Sea, between 2017 and 2021. The first finding is from Tofta skjutfält,a sandy military training ground vegetated with pines and mixed forests on the west coastof Gotland. Based on multi-year observations at the same locality as well as video recordingof an egglaying female it is clearly a resident population, even though larvae are yet to bedocumented. Distoleon tetragrammicus is not previously known from any of the Nordic orBaltic countries. The species is common in southern Europe with a wide distribution acrosswest palearctic and becomes rarer towards central Europe. The closest known locality isan outpost population on the Hel peninsula on the Polish Baltic coast which we speculateis the most probable source, 240km south of Gotland across the Baltic sea. Previously butthree species of antlions were known from the Nordic-Baltic countries, all belonging to thetypical pitfall trap-building tribe Myrmeleontini and subfamily Myrmeleontinae: Myrmeleonformicarius (Linnaeus, 1767), Myrmeleon bore (Tjeder, 1941) and Euroleon nostras (Geoffroyin Fourcroy, 1785). Distoleon tetragrammicus belongs to subfamily Nemoleontinae (tribeNemoleontini) with larvae being ambush predators without the behaviour of building pitfalltraps. We provide an identification key, as well as studio and field photographs of all fourNordic species. The quality and conservation value of Tofta military training ground localityfor insects is discussed with reference to other rare species.

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  • 40.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Elmqvist, Håkan
    Nyström, Dennis
    Gräshoppan Aiolopus thalassinus– långvingad nykomling2020In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 115, no 4, p. 34-36Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Göthberg, Anders
    Johansson, Karolina
    Pettersson, Arne
    Burkart, Werner
    Burkart, Gudrun
    Entomologmötet på Gotland 2017: temaexkursion med fokus på vattenlevande skalbaggar, skinnbaggar och trollsländor i Äskåkersvät.2017In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 139, no 1, p. 39-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The yearly Swedish entomology meeting 2017 was organized by the local entomology

    society of Gotland, on the northern part of the Baltic island Gotland near Bunge, 4-6 August.

    One thematic excursion was focused on aquatic insects, especiallly aquatic beetles,

    bugs and dragonflies. A shallow pond, Äskåkersvät, with Characeae in an open grazed

    landscape with high natural values was studied. Äskåkersvät lies just adjacent to the larger

    area around lake Bästeträsk which is the focus of a pilot study evaluating its potential as

    a future national park. The pilot study is undertaken by Gotland County Administrative

    Board, the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, Region Gotland and the Swedish

    Agency for Marine and Water Management. Here we give an annotated report of the 103

    species found: 69 species of water beetles (out of which 34 were Dytiscidae), 20 species

    of aquatic or semiaquatic bugs (out of which 10 were Corixidae), and 14 species of dragonflies.

    These include Hydrophilus piceus and H. aterrimus redlisted in Sweden (both as

    NT), and Dytiscus latissimus, globally redlisted (VU). We also noted the noble crayfish,

    Astacus astacus (redlisted as CR in Sweden) and the European medicinal leech Hirudo

    medicinalis (redlisted as NT globally). The blue emperor dragonfly (Anax imperator) was

    noted, a species first recorded from Gotland in 2002 and we present a graph on its increase

    and spreading on the island since. The number of species found in spite of a relatively

    modest collecting effort at a suboptimal time when many species may be in pupal stage out

    of water as witnessed by many teneral individuals, indicates a species rich locality with

    high natural value. The stoneworts (Characeae) vegetation certainly contributes to this, for

    instance vouched for by the occurrence of specialists as Haliplus confinis and H. obliquus

    whose larvae feed on stoneworts.

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  • 42.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Lindberg, Gunvi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vårdal, hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Apelqvist, Niklas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Brodin, Yngve
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Arbetet med donationer av insektsamlingar vid Naturhistoriska Riksmuseet2014In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 134, p. 153-162Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the work with donated insect collections at the Swedish Museum of Natural

    History (NRM) in Stockholm, Sweden. The museum receives donations yearly from

    amateur entomologists, and they are an important contribution to the enrichment of the

    collections. For the collector it is satisfying that a public institution takes on the long term

    responsibility of safeguarding the scientific value in a collection, curating and making it

    available for study. Significant donations in the last years include that of Lars Huggert

    (Hymenoptera, Coleoptera), Hans Bartsch (Diptera) and Anders N. Nilsson (aquatic Coleoptera)

    to name a few. The curatorial and digitizing workload at the Entomology collection

    are unfortunately not matched by staff funding, and as at other European museums

    volunteer work constitute vital and invaluable help. We acknowledge especially some of

    the volunteer work in the Coleoptera and Hymenoptera collections. Recently we have engaged

    with amateur entomologists by organizing taxon-specific workshops at the museum

    which has stimulated exchange and collaboration. The Hymenoptera-day was visited by 30

    participants, and the Diptera-meeting by 49. As an example of what happens with a donation

    once it reaches the museum, we describe the work with a recent Coleoptera collection

    donation by Jan Olsson, Vallentuna. A few highlights from the unidentified material,

    including the Archostematan beetle Priacma serrata (Cupedidae) and the false jewelbeetle

    Schizopus laetus (Schizopodidae), are presented as they were new to the NRM collections.

    We also bring attention to two new websites: www.naturarv.se is the webportal presenting

    digitized material in Swedish natural history collections. Both metadata on specimens and

    photos are made searchable here. We also launch a new webpage at www.nrm.se/insektsdonationer

    where we write about new donations to the Entomology collections, with Jan

    Olsson’s Coleoptera collection first out.

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  • 43.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Manuel, Michael
    Coleoptera: Noteridae, burrowing water beetles2022In: The new natural history of Madagascar / [ed] Steven M. Goodman, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022, 1, p. 1044-1047Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Manuel, Michael
    Ranarilalatiana, Tolotra
    Ramahandrison, Andriamirado T.
    Hajek, Jiri
    Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, diving beetles, tsikovoka2022In: The new natural history of Madagascar / [ed] Steven M. Goodman, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022, 1, p. 1024-1034Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nilsson, Lars G R
    Bukontaite, Rasa
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    Åkerjordfly, Agrotis exclamationis, identifierad som värdart för svävflugan Villa hottentotta med hjälp av DNA streckkodning (Diptera: Bombyliidae).2015In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 136, no 4, p. 121-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we identify Agrotis exclamationis (Linnaeus, 1758) as a host species for the bee y Villa hottentotta (Linnaeus, 1758) in Sweden. Host use and speci city for bee y species are generally very poorly known, why the hatching of a bee y of the genus Villa from an unknown Noctuid pupa caught our attention. The parasitized Noctuid pupa was found in a garden in Staffanstorp, Skåne (Sweden), in May 2015 and kept in a jar to hatch. The bee y hatched in June leaving two empty exuviae in the jar. DNA was extracted sepa- rately from both excuviae to identify the y and the host using DNA Barcoding. A 600+ bp long sequence of the gene Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 was sequenced for both samples and queried against the reference library BOLD (www.boldsystems.org). The Noctuid host pupa was unambiguously identi ed as the common Noctuid species Agrotis exclamationis. The sequence was identical to the most common haplotype over much of Europe. The bee y pupa was identi ed as Villa hottentotta, the most common Villa species in Sweden. This added a new Noctuid species to the list of known hosts for V. hottentotta which also includes several other Noctuid genera as well as a Geometrid moth. Belonging to the sand chamber group of bee ies where the female scatter the eggs on the ground while hovering, the active host-seeking rst instar planidium larvae bene ts from having a wide host range to potentially encounter in the substrate zone. 

  • 46.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ranarilalatiana, Tolotra
    Biström, Olof
    A new species of Bidessus from Anjozorobe-Angavo and a review of Malagasy Bidessus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae)2020In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 720, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We review the species of Bidessus of Madagascar and describe Bidessus anjozorobe sp. nov. from material collected in Anjozorobe forest. Anjozorobe is part of the Anjozorobe-Angavo Protected Area, which is an important corridor of transition forest between typical eastern humid forests and the residual sub-humid forest of the Central Highlands. Bidessus longistriga Régimbart, 1895 and Bidessus perexiguus Kolbe, 1883 are widespread but endemic low-altitude species on Madagascar. Bidessus nesioticus Guignot, 1956 is an alpine species described from near the peak of the Ankaratra mountain massifs at 2500 m a.s.l. We recollected the species for the first time since its description, in Ankaratra and in a new area above 2000 m a.s.l. in the Andringitra mountain further south. Bidessus cf. nero Gschwendtner, 1933 is tentatively recorded for Madagascar for the first time but further studies are needed to test the status of mainland and insular populations. Bidessus apicidens Biström & Sanfilippo, 1986 has not been recollected on Madagascar since 1970. All species are endemic to Madagascar except potentially Bidessus cf. ceratus and Bidessus cf. nero described from Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, respectively. The older records of the two non-endemic species Bidessus complicatus Sharp, 1904 and Bidessus ovoideus Régimbart, 1895 on Madagascar could not be verified.

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  • 47.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Weingartner, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University.
    Hajek, Jiri
    Species delimitation of the Hyphydrus ovatus complex in western Palaearctic with an update of species distributions (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae)2017In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 678, p. 73-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The species status of Hyphydrus anatolicus Guignot, 1957 and H. sanctus Sharp, 1882, previously often confused with the widespread H. ovatus (Linnaeus, 1760), are tested with molecular and morphological characters. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) was sequenced for 32 specimens of all three species. Gene-trees were inferred with parsimony, time-free bayesian and strict clock bayesian analyses. The GMYC model was used to estimate species limits. All three species were reciprocally monophyletic with CO1 and highly supported. The GMYC species delimitation analysis unequivocally delimited the three species with no other than the three species solution included in the confidence interval. A likelihood ratio test rejected the one-species null model. Important morphological characters distinguishing the species are provided and illustrated. New distributional data are given for the following species: Hyphydrus anatolicus from Slovakia and Ukraine, and H. aubei Ganglbauer, 1891, and H. sanctus from Turkey.

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  • 48. Biström, Olof
    et al.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A new species of Peschetius GUIGNOT described from Sri Lanka (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)2015In: Koleopterologische Rundschau, Vol. 85, p. 57-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peschetius taprobanicus sp.n. (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) is described on the basis of six specimens

    collected from Sri Lanka. Distinguishing characters are given for the new species.

  • 49. Biström, Olof
    et al.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Two new species of the megadiverse lentic diving-beetle genus Hydrovatus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae) described from NE Thailand.2016In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, no 632, p. 57-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we describe two new Hydrovatus species (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporinae: Hydrovatini) from the province of Khon Kaen, Isan region in NE Thailand. Hydrovatus is the third most species rich genus of diving beetles (Dytiscidae). It occurs on all continents except Antarctica and now numbers 210 currently recognized species. Both new species, Hydrovatus diversipunctatussp. n. and Hydrovatus globosussp. n., were collected at lights and are only known from the type locality "Khon Kaen" (a city and province). Diagnoses based on morphology for the separation from closely related species are given together with illustrations of male genitalia and habitus photos. We provide a determination key to Old World species of the pustulatus species group and to Oriental species of the oblongipennis species group.

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  • 50. Biström, Olof
    et al.
    Nilsson, Anders N
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Taxonomic revision of Afrotropical Laccophilus Leach, 1815 (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae).2015In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, no 542, p. 1-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The African species of the genus Laccophilus Leach, 1815, are revised, on the basis of study of adult specimens. In all, 105 species are now recognized. A phenetic character-analysis was undertaken, which resulted in a split of the genus into 17 species groups. Diagnoses and a description of each species are given together with keys for identification of species groups and species. We also provide habitus photos, illustration of male genitalia and distribution maps for all species. New species are described as follows: Laccophilus grossus sp. n. (Angola, Namibia), Laccophilus rocchii sp. n. (Tanzania, Namibia, Botswana, Mozambique), Laccophilus ferrugo sp. n. (Mozambique), Laccophilus furthi sp. n. (Madagascar), Laccophilus isamberti sp. n. (Madagascar), Laccophilus inobservatus sp. n. (Gambia, Senegal, Mali, Niger, Sudan, Chad, Ethiopia, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon, Zaire and Asia: Yemen), Laccophilus cryptos sp. n. (Zaire, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Botswana, South Africa), Laccophilus enigmaticus sp. n. (Nigeria, Sudan), Laccophilus bellus sp. n. (Benin, Nigeria), Laccophilus guentheri sp. n. (Guinea, Ghana), Laccophilus guineensis sp. n. (Guinea), Laccophilus decorosus sp. n. (Uganda), Laccophilus empheres sp. n. (Kenya), Laccophilus inconstans sp. n. (Guinea, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon), Laccophilus brancuccii sp. n. (Central African Republic), Laccophilus incomptus sp. n. (Cameroon), Laccophilus australis sp. n. (Tanzania, South Africa), Laccophilus minimus sp. n. (Namibia), Laccophilus eboris sp. n. (Ivory Coast), Laccophilus insularum sp. n. (Madagascar), Laccophilus occidentalis sp. n. (Gambia, Senegal, Mali, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Benin, Nigeria, Central African Republic, Zaire) and Laccophilus transversovittatus sp. n. (Madagascar). Laccophilus restrictus Sharp, 1882, is restored as good species; not junior synonym of Laccophilus pictipennis Sharp, 1882. New synonyms are established as follows: Laccophilus continentalis Gschwendtner, 1935 = Laccophilus perplexus Omer-Cooper, 1970, syn. n., Laccophilus taeniolatus Régimbart, 1889 = Laccophilus congener Omer-Cooper, 1957, syn. n., Laccophilus adspersus Boheman, 1848 = Laccophilus vitshumbii Guignot, 1959, syn. n. = Laccophilus adspersus nigeriensis Omer-Cooper, 1970, syn. n. = Laccophilus adspersus sudanensis Omer-Cooper, 1970, syn. n., Laccophilus modestus Régimbart, 1895 = Laccophilus espanyoli Hernando, 1990, syn. n., Laccophilus flaveolus Régimbart, 1906 = Laccophilus pampinatus Guignot, 1941, syn. n., Laccophilus trilineola Régimbart, 1889 = Laccophilus simulator Omer-Cooper, 1958, syn. n., Laccophilus mediocris Guignot, 1952 = Laccophilus meii Rocchi, 2000, syn. n., Laccophilus epinephes Guignot, 1955 = Laccophilus castaneus Guignot, 1956, syn. n., Laccophilus saegeri Guignot, 1958 = Laccophilus comoensis Pederzani & Reintjes, 2002, syn. n., Laccophilus restrictus Sharp, 1882 = Laccophilus evanescens Régimbart, 1895, syn. n., Laccophilus incrassatus Gschwendtner, 1933 = Laccophilus virgatus Guignot, 1953, syn. n., Laccophilus cyclopis Sharp, 1882 = Laccophilus shephardi Omer-Cooper, 1965, syn. n., Laccophilus burgeoni Gschwendtner, 1930 = Laccophilus wittei Guignot, 1952, syn. n., Laccophilus secundus Régimbart, 1895 = Laccophilus torquatus Guignot, 1956, syn. n., Laccophilus desintegratus Régimbart, 1895 = Laccophilus sanguinosus Régimbart, 1895, syn. n. and Laccophilus flavopictus Régimbart, 1889 = Laccophilus bergeri Guignot, 1953, syn. n. = Laccophilus segmentatus Omer-Cooper, 1957, syn. n. Lectotypes are designated for the following taxa: Laccophilus productus Régimbart, 1906, Laccophilus ruficollis Zimmermann, 1919, Laccophilus sordidus Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus alluaudi Régimbart, 1899, Laccophilus pictipennis Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus wehnckei Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus continentalis Gschwendtner, 1935, Laccophilus simplicistriatus Gschwendtner, 1932, Laccophilus complicatus Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus rivulosus Klug, 1833, Laccophilus ampliatus Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus pilitarsis Régimbart, 1906, Laccophilus adspersus Boheman, 1848, Laccophilus livens Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus modestus Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus nodieri Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus flaveolus Régimbart, 1906, Laccophilus pallescens Régimbart, 1903, Laccophilus restrictus Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus vermiculosus Gerstaecker, 1867, Laccophilus mocquerysi Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus bizonatus Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus tschoffeni Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus persimilis Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus poecilus Klug, 1834, Laccophilus lateralis Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus lateralis var. polygrammus Régimbart, 1903, Laccophilus cyclopis Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus shephardi Omer-Cooper, 1965, Laccophilus conjunctus Guignot, 1950, Laccophilus grammicus Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus flavoscriptus Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus flavosignatus Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus brevicollis Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus secundus Régimbart, Laccophilus desintegratus Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus gutticollis Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus luctuosus Sharp, 1882 and Laccophilus inornatus Zimmermann, 1926. Laccophilus remex Guignot, 1952, comprises a species complex with uncertain taxonomic delimitation; the complex includes Laccophilus concisus Guignot, 1953, Laccophilus turneri Omer-Cooper, 1957 and Laccophilus praeteritus Omer-Cooper, 1957, as tentative synonyms of Laccophilus remex Guignot, 1952.

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