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  • 101.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Aves: The living descendants of flying dinosaurs2014In: The tree of life: Evolution and classification of living organisms / [ed] Vargas, Pablo & Zardoya, Rafael, Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates, Inc. , 2014, p. 530-540Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 102.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Current perspectives on the evolution of birds2008In: Contributions to zoology, ISSN 1383-4517, E-ISSN 1875-9866, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 109-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Evolution of terrestrial birds in three continents: biogeography and parallel radiations2012In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 813-824Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Swedish records of the eastern Palearctic Hoopoe subspecies Upupa epops saturata1997In: Bulletin of the British Ornithologist's Club, ISSN 0007-1595, Vol. 117, p. 19-26Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 105.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Systematic relationships of the palaeogene family Presbyornithidae (Aves: Anseriformes)1997In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 121, no 4, p. 429-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early Tertiary (Paleocene and Eocene) family Presbyornithidae is one of the most completely known group of fossil birds. Essentially all parts of the skeleton are represented in the fossil record, allowing a thorough analysis of the phylogenetic position of the family. Forty-two families of nonpasserine birds representing the orders Ciconiiformes, Anseriformes, Galliformes, Gruiformes and Charadriiformes, were included in a cladistic analysis of 71 skeletal characters. The previously suggested anseriform affinity of the Presbyornithidae was confirmed. Furthermore, the family proved to be closer to the Anatidae than to the Anhimidae or Anseranatidae. The many postcranial similarities with certain charadriiform birds as the Burhinidae, obviously are plesiomorphies. By this observation, a better undestanding of character evolution in nonpasserine skeletal morphology is gained. The often suggested close relationship of anseriform and galliform birds is not confirmed by osteology. Instead, the Anseriformes and the Phoenicopteridae form a monophyletic clade that is the sister to the remaining ciconiiform birds. This result renders the Ciconiiformes sensu Wetmore (1960) polyphyletic. (C) 1997 The Linnean Society of London.

  • 106.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    The skeletal evidence for a sister-group relationship of anseriform and galliform birds - A critical evaluation1996In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 195-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The osteological basis for the proposed close phylogenetical relationship of anseriform and galliform birds is evaluated and found to be very weak. Out of eleven postulated synapomorphies in cranial morphology (Cracraft 1988), three must be excluded since they express variation that is already covered by any of the other eleven characters. Another six of the postulated synapomorhies either cannot be verified to occur in most anseriforms and galliforms, or have a wide distribution outside this group. A re-analysis of the combined morphological and biochemical data set of Cracraft and Mindell (1989) with the questionable osteological characters excluded, does not corroborate an anseriform-galliform sister-group relationship, but leaves the Neognathae unresolved.

  • 107.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Anderson, Caisa Lisa
    Mayr, Gerald
    Hangin' on to our rocks 'n clocks: a reply to Brown et al2007In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 260-261Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Anderson, Cajsa L
    Britton, Tom
    Elzanowski, Andrzej
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Källersjö, Mari
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Parsons, Thomas J
    Zuccon, Dario
    Mayr, Gerald
    Diversification of Neoaves: integration of molecular sequence data and fossils.2006In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 543-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patterns of diversification and timing of evolution within Neoaves, which includes almost 95% of all bird species, are virtually unknown. On the other hand, molecular data consistently indicate a Cretaceous origin of many neoavian lineages and the fossil record seems to support an Early Tertiary diversification. Here, we present the first well-resolved molecular phylogeny for Neoaves, together with divergence time estimates calibrated with a large number of stratigraphically and phylogenetically well-documented fossils. Our study defines several well-supported clades within Neoaves. The calibration results suggest that Neoaves, after an initial split from Galloanseres in Mid-Cretaceous, diversified around or soon after the K/T boundary. Our results thus do not contradict palaeontological data and show that there is no solid molecular evidence for an extensive pre-Tertiary radiation of Neoaves.

  • 109.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Carrasquilla, F. H.
    Subspecific identity of prehistoric Baltic cormorants Phalacrocorax carbo1997In: Ardea, ISSN 0373-2266, E-ISSN 2213-1175, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cormorants of the subspecies Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis breed in large numbers in the Baltic Sea. They migrate to the Mediterranean region to winter and are then replaced in the Baltic by wintering individuals of the Norwegian population of the nominate subspecies carbo. Cormorants bred in the Baltic during prehistoric times too, but as evident from a comparison of skeletal measurements in present-day and prehistoric Cormorants, these individuals belonged to the nominate subspecies carbo. The Swedish subfossil record of the Cormorants available for study, does not include any remains small enough to suggest the presence of sinensis. Precisely when the subspecies sinensis immigrated into the Baltic is unknown, but it must have occurred sometime between 1500 and 1800 AD.

  • 110.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Christidis, Les
    Cooper, Alan
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Jackson, Jennifer
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Norman, Janette A
    A Gondwanan origin of passerine birds supported by DNA sequences of the endemic New Zealand wrens.2002In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 269, no 1488, p. 235-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zoogeographic, palaeontological and biochemical data support a Southern Hemisphere origin for passerine birds, while accumulating molecular data suggest that most extant avian orders originated in the mid-Late Cretaceous. We obtained DNA sequence data from the nuclear c-myc and RAG-1 genes of the major passerine groups and here we demonstrate that the endemic New Zealand wrens (Acanthisittidae) are the sister taxon to all other extant passerines, supporting a Gondwanan origin and early radiation of passerines. We propose that (i) the acanthisittids were isolated when New Zealand separated from Gondwana (ca. 82-85 Myr ago), (ii) suboscines, in turn, were derived from an ancestral lineage that inhabited western Gondwana, and (iii) the ancestors of the oscines (songbirds) were subsequently isolated by the separation of Australia from Antarctica. The later spread of passerines into the Northern Hemisphere reflects the northward migration of these former Gondwanan elements.

  • 111.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Christidis, Les
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Norman, Janette A
    Systematic affinities of the lyrebirds (Passeriformes: Menura), with a novel classification of the major groups of passerine birds.2002In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 53-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships of the lyrebirds are investigated using DNA sequence data. The aligned data matrix consists of 4027 bp obtained from three nuclear genes (c-myc, RAG-1 and myoglobin intron II) and two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b and ND2). Both maximum-likelihood and parsimony analyses show that the lyrebirds unambiguously belong to the oscine radiation, and that they are the sister taxon to all other oscines. The results do not support the suggestion based on DNA-DNA hybridization data (Sibley and Ahlquist, 1990) that the treecreepers and bowerbirds are part of the lyrebird clade. Nevertheless, treecreepers and bowerbirds are sister taxa to all other oscines (except the lyrebirds) and may constitute a monophyletic group, although bootstrap support values for this clade are low. A major disagreement between the present analysis and that based on DNA-DNA hybridization data is that the Corvida (sensu Sibley and Ahlquist, 1990) and Passerida are not reciprocally monophyletic, as we find the latter group be nested within the Corvida. Also, the superfamilies Meliphagoidea and Corvoidea sensu, are not recovered as monophyletic in the present study. Within the oscine radiation, all taxa belonging to the earliest splits are confined to the Australo-Papuan region. This suggests strongly that the origins and early radiation of the oscines occurred in the southern supercontinent Gondwana. A new classification of the major groups of passerines is presented following from the results presented in the present study, as well as those published recently on analyses of sequence data from the nuclear c-myc and RAG-1 genes (Ericson et al., 2002; Irestedt et al., 2001).

  • 112.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Envall, Ida
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Norman, Janette A
    Inter-familial relationships of the shorebirds (Aves: Charadriiformes) based on nuclear DNA sequence data.2003In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 3, p. 16-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Phylogenetic hypotheses of higher-level relationships in the order Charadriiformes based on morphological data, partly disagree with those based on DNA-DNA hybridisation data. So far, these relationships have not been tested by analysis of DNA sequence data. Herein we utilize 1692 bp of aligned, nuclear DNA sequences obtained from 23 charadriiform species, representing 15 families. We also test earlier suggestions that bustards and sandgrouses may be nested with the charadriiforms. The data is analysed with methods based on the parsimony and maximum-likelihood criteria.

    RESULTS: Several novel phylogenetic relationships were recovered and strongly supported by the data, regardless of which method of analysis was employed. These include placing the gulls and allied groups as a sistergroup to the sandpiper-like birds, and not to the plover-like birds. The auks clearly belong to the clade with the gulls and allies, and are not basal to most other charadriiform birds as suggested in analyses of morphological data. Pluvialis, which has been supposed to belong to the plover family (Charadriidae), represents a basal branch that constitutes the sister taxon to a clade with plovers, oystercatchers and avocets. The thick-knees and sheathbills unexpectedly cluster together.

    CONCLUSION: The DNA sequence data contains a strong phylogenetic signal that results in a well-resolved phylogenetic tree with many strongly supported internodes. Taxonomically it is the most inclusive study of shorebird families that relies on nucleotide sequences. The presented phylogenetic hypothesis provides a solid framework for analyses of macroevolution of ecological, morphological and behavioural adaptations observed within the order Charadriiformes.

  • 113.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Evolution, biogeography, and patterns of diversification in passerine birds2003In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 3-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper summarizes and discusses the many new insights into passerine evolution gained from an increased general interest in avian evolution among biologists, and particularly from the extensive use of DNA sequence data in phylogenetic reconstruction. The sister group relationship between the New Zealand rifleman and all other passerines, indicates the importance of the former southern supercontinent Gondwana in the earliest evolution of this group. Following the break-up of Gondwana, the ancestors of other major passerine groups became isolated in Australia (oscines), South America (New World suboscines), and possibly, the then connected Kerguelen Plateau/India/Madagascar tectonic plates (Old World suboscines). The oscines underwent a significant radiation in the Australo-Papuan region and only a few oscine lineages have spread further than to the nearby Southeast Asia. A remarkable exception is the ancestor to the vast Passerida radiation, which now comprises 35% of all bird species. This group obviously benefitted greatly from the increased diversity in plant seed size and morphology during the Tertiary. The lyrebirds (and possibly scrub-birds) constitute the sister group to all other oscines, which renders “Corvida” (sensu Sibley and Ahlquist 1990) paraphyletic. Sequence data suggests that Passerida, the other clade of oscines postulated based on the results of DNA–DNA hybridizations, is monophyletic, and that the rockfowl and rock-jumpers are the most basal members of this clade. The suboscines in the Old World (Eurylamides) and the New World (Tyrannides), respectively, are sister groups. A provisional, working classification of the passerines is presented based on the increased understanding of the major patterns of passerine evolution.

  • 114.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics, Swedish Museum of Natural History, PO Box 50007, 10405, Stockholm, Sweden.
    She, Huishang
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, People's Republic of China.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.
    Genomic signatures of rapid adaptive divergence in a tropical montane species2021In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 20210089-20210089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mountain regions contain extraordinary biodiversity. The environmental heterogeneity and glacial cycles often accelerate speciation and adaptation ofmontane species, but how these processes influence the genomic differentiation of these species is largely unknown. Using a novel chromosomelevel genome and population genomic comparisons, we study allopatricdivergence and selection in an iconic bird living in a tropical mountainregion in New Guinea, Archbold’s bowerbird (Amblyornis papuensis). Ourresults show that the two populations inhabiting the eastern and western Central Range became isolated ca 11 800 years ago, probably because the suitablehabitats for this cold-tolerating bird decreased when the climate got warmer.Our genomic scans detect that genes in highly divergent genomic regions areover-represented in developmental processes, which is probably associatedwith the observed differences in body size between the populations. Overall,our results suggest that environmental differences between the eastern andwestern Central Range probably drive adaptive divergence between them.

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  • 115.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Jansén, Anna-Lee
    Stockholms universitet.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ekman, Jan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Inter-generic relationships of the crows, jays, magpies and allied groups (Aves: Corvidae) based on nucleotide sequence data2005In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 222-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships were studied based on DNA sequences obtained from all recognized genera of the family Corvidae sensu stricto. The aligned data set consists 2589 bp obtained from one mitochondrial and two nuclear genes. Maximum parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and Bayesian inference analyses were used to estimate phylogenetic relationships. The analyses were done for each gene separately, as well as for all genes combined. An analysis of a taxonomically expanded data set of cytochrome b sequences was performed in order to infer the phylogenetic positions of six genera for which nuclear genes could not be obtained. Monophyly of the Corvidae is supported by all analyses, as well as by the occurrence of a deletion of 16 bp in the β-fibrinogen intron in all ingroup taxa. Temnurus and Pyrrhocorax are placed as the sister group to all other corvids, while Cissa and Urocissa appear as the next clade inside them. Further up in the tree, two larger and well-supported clades of genera were recovered by the analyses. One has an entirely New World distribution (the New World jays), while the other includes mostly Eurasian (and one African) taxa. Outside these two major clades are Cyanopica and Perisoreus whose phylogenetic positions could not be determined by the present data. A biogeographic analysis of our data suggests that the Corvidae underwent an initial radiation in Southeast Asia. This is consistent with the observation that almost all basal clades in the phylogenetic tree consist of species adapted to tropical and subtropical forest habitats.

  • 116.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Phylogeny of Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes) based on nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data.2003In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 126-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Passerida is a monophyletic group of oscine passerines that includes almost 3500 species (about 36%) of all bird species in the world. The current understanding of higher-level relationships within Passerida is based on DNA-DNA hybridizations [C.G. Sibley, J.E. Ahlquist, Phylogeny and Classification of Birds, 1990, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT]. Our results are based on analyses of 3130 aligned nucleotide sequence data obtained from 48 ingroup and 13 outgroup genera. Three nuclear genes were sequenced: c-myc (498-510 bp), RAG-1 (930 bp), and myoglobin (693-722 bp), as well one mitochondrial gene; cytochrome b (879 bp). The data were analysed by parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and Bayesian inference. The African rockfowl and rockjumper are found to constitute the deepest branch within Passerida, but relationships among the other taxa are poorly resolved--only four major clades receive statistical support. One clade corresponds to Passeroidea of [C.G. Sibley, B.L. Monroe, Distribution and Taxonomy of Birds of the World, 1990, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT] and includes, e.g., flowerpeckers, sunbirds, accentors, weavers, estrilds, wagtails, finches, and sparrows. Starlings, mockingbirds, thrushes, Old World flycatchers, and dippers also group together in a clade corresponding to Muscicapoidea of Sibley and Monroe [op. cit.]. Monophyly of their Sylvioidea could not be corroborated--these taxa falls either into a clade with wrens, gnatcatchers, and nuthatches, or one with, e.g., warblers, bulbuls, babblers, and white-eyes. The tits, penduline tits, and waxwings belong to Passerida but have no close relatives among the taxa studied herein.

  • 117.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Parsons, Thomas J.
    Erratum: Major divisions of oscines revealed by insertions in the nuclear gene c-myc: A novel gene in avian phylogenetics (vol 117, pg 1077, 2000)2001In: The AUK: A Quarterly Journal of Ornithology, ISSN 0004-8038, E-ISSN 1938-4254, Vol. 118, no 2, p. 563-563Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Parsons, Thomas J.
    Major divisions in oscines revealed by insertions in the nuclear gene c-myc: A novel gene in avian phylogenetics2000In: The AUK: A Quarterly Journal of Ornithology, ISSN 0004-8038, E-ISSN 1938-4254, Vol. 117, no 4, p. 1069-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 119.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Klopfstein, Seraina
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Nguyen, Jacqueline MT
    Nylander, Johan A A
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Dating the diversification of the major lineages of Passeriformes (Aves)2014In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The avian Order Passeriformes is an enormously species-rich group, which comprises almost 60% ofall living bird species. This diverse order is believed to have originated before the break-up of Gondwana in the lateCretaceous. However, previous molecular dating studies have relied heavily on the geological split between NewZealand and Antarctica, assumed to have occurred 85–82 Mya, for calibrating the molecular clock and might thusbe circular in their argument.Results: This study provides a time-scale for the evolution of the major clades of passerines using seven nuclearmarkers, five taxonomically well-determined passerine fossils, and an updated interpretation of the New Zealandsplit from Antarctica 85–52 Mya in a Bayesian relaxed-clock approach. We also assess how different interpretationsof the New Zealand–Antarctica vicariance event influence our age estimates. Our results suggest that thediversification of Passeriformes began in the late Cretaceous or early Cenozoic. Removing the root calibration forthe New Zealand–Antarctica vicariance event (85–52 Mya) dramatically increases the 95% credibility intervals andleads to unrealistically old age estimates. We assess the individual characteristics of the seven nuclear genesanalyzed in our study. Our analyses provide estimates of divergence times for the major groups of passerines,which can be used as secondary calibration points in future molecular studies.Conclusions: Our analysis takes recent paleontological and geological findings into account and provides the bestestimate of the passerine evolutionary time-scale currently available. This time-scale provides a temporalframework for further biogeographical, ecological, and co-evolutionary studies of the largest bird radiation, andadds to the growing support for a Cretaceous origin of Passeriformes.

  • 120.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Olson, Storrs L.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Alvarenga, Herculano
    Fjeldsa, Jon
    Circumscription of a monophyletic family for the tapaculos (Aves: Rhinocryptidae)2010In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 151, no 2, p. 337-345Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 121.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Parsons, Thomas J.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Morphological and molecular support for non-monophyly of the Galloanserae2001In: New Perspectives on the Origin and Evolution of Birds: Proceedings of the International Symposium in Honor of John H. Ostrom / [ed] Gauthier, J. & Gall, L.F., New Haven: Yale University, 2001, p. 157-168Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 122.
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Blom, Mozes P. K.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    A genomic perspective of the pink-headed duck Rhodonessa caryophyllacea suggests a long history of low effective population size2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 16853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for the possibly extinct pink-headed duck Rhodonessa caryophyllacea unambiguously shows that it belongs to the pochard radiation that also includes the genera Aythya and Netta. It is the sister to all modern-day pochards and belongs to a lineage that branched off from the others more than 2.8 million years ago. Rhodonessa caryophyllacea is believed to never have been common in modern time and we show this has probably been the situation for as long as 100,000 years. Our results suggest that their effective population size varied between 15,000 and 25,000 individuals during the last 150,000 years of the Pleistocene. The reasons behind this are largely unknown as very little is known about the life-history and biology of this species. Presumably it is due to factors related to feeding or to breeding, but we may never know this for sure.

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  • 123.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Alvarenga, Herculano
    Prum, Richard O
    Higher-level phylogeny and morphological evolution of tyrant flycatchers, cotingas, manakins, and their allies (Aves: Tyrannida).2006In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 471-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increased understanding of higher-level relationships in passerine birds in the last 15 years, the taxonomic boundaries and phylogenetic interrelationships of the major groups of the Tyrannida (including the cotingas, manakins, tityrines, and tyrant flycatchers) remain unclear. Here, we present an analysis of DNA sequence data obtained from two nuclear exons, three introns, and one mitochondrial gene for 26 genera of Tyrannida and 6 tracheophone outgroups. The analysis resulted in well-supported hypotheses about the earliest evolution within Tyrannida. The Cotingidae, Pipridae, Tityrinae (sensu) [Prum, R.O., Rice, N.H., Mobley, J.A., Dimmick, W.W., 2000. A preliminary phylogenetic hypothesis for the cotingas (Cotingidae) based on mitochondrial DNA. Auk 117, 236-241], Tyrannidae, and the tyrannid subfamiles Tyranninae and Pipromorphinae (sensu) [Sibley, C.G., Monroe, B. L. Jr., 1990. Distribution and Taxonomy of Birds of the World. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT] were all found to be reciprocally monophyletic (given the present taxon sampling). The Cotingidae and Pipridae form a clade that is the sister group to a well-supported clade including Oxyruncus, the Tityrinae, Piprites, and the Tyrannidae. Oxyruncus is the sister group to the Tityrinae, and Piprites is placed as the sister group to the Tyrannidae. The tyrannid subfamilies Tyranninae and Pipromorphinae are monophyletic sister taxa, but the relationships of Platyrinchus mystaceus to these two clades remains ambiguous. The presence of medial (=internal) cartilages in the syrinx is a synapomorphy for the Oxyruncus-Tityrinae-Piprites-Tyrannidae clade. Although morphological synapomorphies currently support the monophyly of both the Pipridae and the Cotingidae, convergences and/or reversals in morphological character states are common in Tyrannida. The relationship between Oxyruncus and the Tityrinae is congruent with additional syringeal synapomorphies and allozyme distance data. Accordingly, we propose the recognition the family Tityridae within the Tyrannida to include the genera Schiffornis, Laniisoma, Laniocera, Iodopleura, Xenopsaris, Pachyramphus, Tityra, and Oxyruncus.

  • 124. Eriksson, Torsten
    et al.
    Lundberg, Magnus
    Töpel, Mats
    Östensson, Pia
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Smedmark, Jenny E. E.
    Sibbaldia: a molecular phylogenetic study of a remarkably polyphyletic genus in Rosaceae2014In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 301, p. 171-184Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Ertz, Damien
    et al.
    Meise Botanic Garden, Department Research, Nieuwelaan 38, BE-1860 Meise, Belgium and Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, Service Général de l’Enseignement Supérieur et de la Recherche Scientifique, Rue A. Lavallée 1, B-1080 Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Anders, Tehler
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    New species of Arthoniales from Cape Verde with an enlarged concept of the genus Ingaderia2023In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 55, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 126. Ertz, Damien
    et al.
    Huereca, Alejandro
    Salcedo-Martínez, Sergio
    Tehler, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany. anders.tehler@nrm.se.
    Remarkable cases of parallel evolution of the placodioid thallus growth form in the Lecanographaceae (Arthoniales) with the description of a new species of Alyxoria from MexicoIn: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new species Alyxoria sierramadrensis is described from Mexico where it inhabits limestone rocks. The lichen developing from this fungus is characterized by a placodioid to subfoliose thallus with a white pruinose surface; rounded to shortly elongated ascomata with a black epruinose margin and a widely exposed, white pruinose hymenial disc; hyaline, 3-septate ascospores,17–25 × 7–9 μm; the presence of anthraquinones rendering the medulla orange. Phylogenetic analyses of nuLSU, mtSSU and RPB2 sequences place this species in the genus Alyxoria (Lecanographaceae). This generic affiliation is surprising because all known Alyxoria species have a crustose thallus. Lecanographaceae mainly includes species without a thallus (lichenicolous taxa) or with a thin crustose thallus, the only exception being Simonyella variegata with a fruticose thallus. The new species belongs to the Alyxoria ochrocheila subgroup, which includes lichens also frequently known to have anthraquinones, white pruinose hymenial discs and 3-septate ascospores. Phylogenetic analyses further determined the systematic position of the monotypic genus Phoebus. This genus, considered as an Arthoniales of uncertain family affiliation, is shown to belong to the Lecanographaceae. With its placodioid thallus, it is another example of a lichenized fungus with a deviating morphology in thallus structure for the family, increasing the number of remarkable cases of parallel evolution of lichen growth forms within the Arthoniales. Phoebus hydrophobius is newly recorded for Mexico.

  • 127. Ertz, Damien
    et al.
    Tehler, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany. anders.tehler@nrm.se.
    The phylogeny of Arthoniales (Pezizomycotina) inferred from nucLSU and RPB2 sequences2011In: Fungal Diversity, Vol. 49, p. 47-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 128. Ertz, Damien
    et al.
    Tehler, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany. anders.tehler@nrm.se.
    Fischer, Eberhard
    Killmann, Dorothee
    Razafindrahaja, D.
    Sérusiaux, Emmanuel
    Isalonactisa new genus of Roccellaceae (Arthoniales) from southern Madagascar2014In: Lichenologist, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 159-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 129. Ertz, Damien
    et al.
    Tehler, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Frisch, Andreas
    Thor, Göran
    Pieter, van den Boom
    A large-scale phylogenetic revision of Roccellaceae (Arthoniales) reveals eight new genera2015In: Fungal Diversity, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 31-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 130. Escolástico-Ortiz, Dennis Alejandro
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Quandt, Dietmar
    Harpke, Dörte
    Larraín, Juan
    Stech, Michael
    Villareal A., Juan Carlos
    Cryptic speciation shapes the biogeographic history of anorthern distributed moss2022In: Botanical journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4074, E-ISSN 1095-8339, Vol. 201, p. 114-134Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 131. Esseen, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Tremella confluens på långskägg - en ny art för Sverige2023In: Lavbulletinen, ISSN 1651-6435, p. 74-79Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 132. Ewen, John G
    et al.
    Flux, Ian
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Systematic affinities of two enigmatic New Zealand passerines of high conservation priority, the hihi or stitchbird Notiomystis cincta and the kokako Callaeas cinerea.2006In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 281-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 133. Farris, James S.
    et al.
    Källersjö, Mari
    Crowe, Timothy M.
    Lipscomb, Diana
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Frigatebirds, Tropicbirds and Ciconiida: Excesses of Confidence Probability1999In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 134.
    Fernández-Brime, Samantha
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Gaya, E
    Llimona, X
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Navarro-Rosinés, P
    Rhagadodidymellopsis endocarponis gen. et sp. nov. and Arthopyrenia symbiotica (Dothideomyceta), two lichenicolous fungi growing on Endocarpon species.2020In: Plant and Fungal Systematics, Vol. 65, p. 176-184Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 135.
    Fernández-Brime, Samantha
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Llimona, X.
    Hladun, N
    Gaya, E
    First report of the pantropical species Diploschistes rampoddensis from Europe.2014In: Mycotaxon, ISSN 0093-4666, E-ISSN 2154-8889, Vol. 129, p. 387-395Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 136.
    Fernández-Brime, Samantha
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Olariaga, Ibai
    Baral, H.-O.
    Friebes, G.
    Jaklitsch, W.
    Senn-Irlet, B.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Cryptodiscus muriformis and Schizoxylon gilenstamii, two new species of Stictidaceae (Ascomycota)2018In: Mycological progress, ISSN 1617-416X, E-ISSN 1861-8952, Vol. 17, p. 295-305Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 137. Fjeldsa, Jon
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    The Cinnamon Ibon Hypocryptadius cinnamomeus is a forest canopy sparrow2010In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 152, no 4, p. 747-760Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 138. Fjeldsa, Jon
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Jonsson, Knud A.
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogeny of the ovenbird genus Upucerthia: a case of independent adaptations for terrestrial life2007In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 133-141Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Zoological Museum Natural History Museum Copenhagen University Universitetsparken 15 Copenhagen Oe DK‐2100 Denmark;Centre for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate GLOBE Institute University of Copenhagen Universitetsparken 15, Building 3 Copenhagen Oe DK‐2100 Denmark.
    Dinesen, Lars
    Centre for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate GLOBE Institute University of Copenhagen Universitetsparken 15, Building 3 Copenhagen Oe DK‐2100 Denmark.
    Davies, Owen R.
    Department of Biological Sciences DST/NRF Centre of Excellence at the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology University of Cape Town Rondebosch 7701 South Africa.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics Swedish Museum of Natural History PO Box 50007 Stockholm 10405 Sweden.
    Krabbe, Niels K.
    Zoological Museum Natural History Museum Copenhagen University Universitetsparken 15 Copenhagen Oe DK‐2100 Denmark.
    Hansen, Louis A.
    Centre for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate GLOBE Institute University of Copenhagen Universitetsparken 15, Building 3 Copenhagen Oe DK‐2100 Denmark.
    Bowie, Rauri C. K.
    Department of Biological Sciences DST/NRF Centre of Excellence at the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology University of Cape Town Rondebosch 7701 South Africa;Department of Integrative Biology Museum of Vertebrate Zoology University of California 3101 Valley Life Science Building Berkeley CA 94720‐3160 USA.
    Description of two new Cisticola species endemic to the marshes of the Kilombero floodplain of southwestern Tanzania2021In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 163, no 4, p. 1330-1354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of two undescribed cisticola warblers in the marshes of the Kilombero floodplain in central Tanzania has been known since the 1980s and these putative new species have been illustrated in field guides on African birds, although with no formal name. Here we name both species, based on two museum specimens collected in 1961 and recently detected in a museum collection. We use these specimens to provide formal descriptions of each form and, using DNA sequence data extracted from these specimens, we place them in a broad phylogenetic framework for the genus Cisticola. The phylogenetic placement indicates that one of the new species is nested within a group of plain-backed duetting cisticolas and the other within the streak-backed marsh cisticolas. We use our own and public recordings to characterize the vocal repertoire of each of these new species and compare song characteristics with other members of their respective clades. Dating of nodes in the molecular phylogeny suggests that both cisticolas endemic to the Kilombero became isolated and diverged from their sister-species between 2.5 and 3.5 million years ago, long after the formation of the Eastern Arc Mountains and the Malawi Rift. We propose that both species should be classified as globally endangered, owing to immense anthropogenic pressures on the floodplain, as documented in several publications and by a recent Ramsar Advisory Mission.

  • 140. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Three new bird family names2015In: Bird Families of the World / [ed] Winkler, D.W., Billerman, S.M. & Lovette, I.J., Barcelona: Lynx Edicions , 2015, p. 33-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 141. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Molecular data reveal some major adaptational shifts in the early evolution of the most diverse avian family, the Furnariidae2005In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 146, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A robust phylogeny estimate for the family Furnariidae (sensu lato) was obtained using sequences of two nuclear introns and one mitochondrial gene (cyt b). Contrary to the widely accepted sister-group relationship of ovenbirds (Furnariinae) and woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptinae), a basal clade is suggested for Sclerurus and Geositta, while Xenops, hitherto considered an aberrant ovenbird, was found to occupy a basal position on the woodcreeper lineage. The morphological variation is re-interpreted in view of this revised phylogenetic hypothesis. Presumably, the remarkable adaptive radiation in this family started as primitive, Sclerurus-likes forms, which used the tail as a prop during terrestrial feeding, lured up to seek food on tree-trunks. The two basal woodcreeper genera, Xenops and then Glyphorynchus, show strong cranial specializations for hammering in wood, thus presenting a remarkable parallelism with the family Picidae, Xenops resembling a piculet, Glyphorynchus, a diminutive woodpecker. However, this specialization was lost in other woodcreepers, which show a more normal passerine skull, adapted for probing and prying in tree-trunk crevices and sallying for escaping insects. The ovenbirds developed a more flexible (rhynchokinetic) bill, well suited for probing and retrieving hidden prey in dead-leaf clusters and debris suspended in the vegetation, and in epiphyte masses. Adaptations to live in open terrain are secondary.

  • 142. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Lokugalappatti, L.G. Sampath
    Bowie, Rauri
    Diversification of African greenbuls in space and time: linking ecological and historical processes2007In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 148, no suppl. 2, p. 359-367Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 143. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Batalha-Filho, Henrique
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Rapid expansion and diversification into new niche space by fluvicoline flycatchers2018In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 49, article id jav-01661Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 144. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Sapayoa aenigma: a New World representative of 'Old World suboscines'.2003In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 270 Suppl 2, p. S238-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Passerine birds are very plastic in their adaptations, which has made it difficult to define phylogenetic lineages and correctly allocate all species to these. Sapayoa aenigma, a member of the large group of New World flycatchers, has been difficult to place, and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments have indicated that it may have been misplaced. This is confirmed here, as base sequencing of two nuclear genes places it as a deep branch in the group of broadbills and pittas of the Old World tropics. The peculiar distribution of this lineage may be best explained in terms of a Gondwanic and Late Cretaceous origin of the passerine birds, as this particular lineage dispersed from the Antarctic landmass, reaching the Old World tropics via the drifting Indian plate, and South America via the West Antarctic Peninsula.

  • 145. Fossen, Erlend I
    et al.
    Ekrem, Torbjørn
    Nilsson, Anders N
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Species delimitation in northern European water scavenger beetles of the genus Hydrobius (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae).2016In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, no 564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chiefly Holarctic Hydrobius species complex (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae) currently consists of Hydrobius arcticus Kuwert, 1890, and three morphological variants of Hydrobius fuscipes (Linnaeus, 1758): var. fuscipes, var. rottenbergii and var. subrotundus in northern Europe. Here molecular and morphological data are used to test the species boundaries in this species complex. Three gene segments (COI, H3 and ITS2) were sequenced and analyzed with Bayesian methods to infer phylogenetic relationships. The Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent (GMYC) model and two versions of the Bayesian species delimitation method BPP, with or without an a priori defined guide tree (v2.2 & v3.0), were used to evaluate species limits. External and male genital characters of primarily Fennoscandian specimens were measured and statistically analyzed to test for significant differences in quantitative morphological characters. The four morphotypes formed separate genetic clusters on gene trees and were delimited as separate species by GMYC and by both versions of BPP, despite specimens of Hydrobius fuscipes var. fuscipes and Hydrobius fuscipes var. subrotundus being sympatric. Hydrobius arcticus and Hydrobius fuscipes var. rottenbergii could only be separated genetically with ITS2, and were delimited statistically with GMYC on ITS2 and with BPP on the combined data. In addition, six or seven potentially cryptic species of the Hydrobius fuscipes complex from regions outside northern Europe were delimited genetically. Although some overlap was found, the mean values of six male genital characters were significantly different between the morphotypes (p < 0.001). Morphological characters previously presumed to be diagnostic were less reliable to separate Hydrobius fuscipes var. fuscipes from Hydrobius fuscipes var. subrotundus, but characters in the literature for Hydrobius arcticus and Hydrobius fuscipes var. rottenbergii were diagnostic. Overall, morphological and molecular evidence strongly suggest that Hydrobius arcticus and the three morphological variants of Hydrobius fuscipes are separate species and Hydrobius rottenbergii Gerhardt, 1872, stat. n. and Hydrobius subrotundus Stephens, 1829, stat. n. are elevated to valid species. An identification key to northern European species of Hydrobius is provided.

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  • 146. Freire-Rallo, Sandra
    et al.
    Diederich, Paul
    Millanes, Ana M.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Five new species in the Tremella caloplacae complex2023In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 180, no 5, p. 107680-107680, article id 107680Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 147. Freire-Rallo, Sandra
    et al.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Diederich, Paul
    Millanes, Ana M.
    To explore strange new worlds – The diversification in Tremella caloplacae was linked to the adaptive radiation of the Teloschistaceae2023In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 180, p. 107680-107680, article id 107680Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 148.
    Friis, Else Marie
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Crane, Peter Robert
    Oak Spring Gardens.
    Pedersen, Kaj Raunsgaard
    Aarhus University.
    Early and Mid-Cretaceous Aristolochiaceous Seeds from Portugal and Eastern North America2022In: International journal of plant sciences, ISSN 1058-5893, E-ISSN 1537-5315, Vol. 183, no 7, p. 587-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Premise of research. The fossil record of Aristolochiaceae (Piperales, magnoliids) is sparse, particularly from Cretaceous strata. Fossil seeds from the Early and mid-Cretaceous of Portugal and North America provide the earliest unequivocal documentation of the group.

    Methodology. Detailed morphological and anatomical investigations of the fossil aristolochiaceous seeds were carried out using SEM and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM). Comparison with other seeds, extinct as well as extant, was based on published data and SRXTM analyses.

    Pivotal results. Two new genera and two new species, Aristospermum huberi and Siratospermum mauldinense, are described based on fossil seeds from the Early and mid-Cretaceous of Portugal and North America. The seeds are anatropous and bitegmic, with the micropyle formed by the inner integument. The testa consists of an exotesta of varied thickness and an endotesta of crystalliferous cells. The tegmen is three cell layers thick and consists of an outermost layer of longitudinally aligned fibers, a middle layer of transversely aligned fibers perpendicular to the longitudinal fibers, and an inner layer of thin-walled cuboidal cells. In most seeds the exotesta is abraded, exposing the crystalliferous cells of the endotesta. Among extant plants, a similar seed coat with a crystalliferous endotesta and crossing fibers in the tegmen is unique to Aristolochiaceae.

    Conclusion. The unique seed coat allows Aristospermum and Siratospermum to be assigned confidently to the lineage that today includes extant Aristolochiaceae. Aristospermum and Siratospermum provide the first unequivocal documentation of the Aristolochiaceae lineage of the Piperales during the Early Cretaceous diversification of angiosperms.

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  • 149.
    Friis, Else Marie
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Crane, Peter Robert
    Oak Spring Gardens.
    Pedersen, Kaj Raunsgaard
    Aarhus University.
    Extinct seed plant diversity in the Early Cretaceous: An enigmatic new microsporangiate fossil with Decussosporites pollen in situ2022In: Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, ISSN 0034-6667, E-ISSN 1879-0615, Vol. 304, p. 104716-104716, article id 104716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new microsporangiate cone, Renbernia zhoui, is described from the mesofossil flora extracted from exposures ofthe Potomac Group at Puddledock, Virginia, U.S.A., which are of Early Cretaceous (early-middle Albian) age. The cone consists of densely arranged dorsiventrally flattened laminar, flabelliform microsporangiophores that bear two elongate microsporangia on the presumed abaxial surface. The microsporangia are separated by sterile tissue that expands apically into a prominent hood-like sterile extension. The microsporangia have extrorse valvate dehiscence and both microsporangia and sterile apical expansion are covered by a short stiff hairs. In situ pollen resembles Decussosporites, elliptical with a long median colpus on the presumed distal surface flanked laterally by two equally long lateral colpi. A short transverse colpus on the presumed proximal surface links the two lateral colpi and divides the grain into two parts creating the appearance of two sacci. Renbernia zhoui is similar to Brenneria potomacensis described from the slightly older Drewry's Bluff and Dutch Gap mesofossil floras from the Potomac Group that also has Decussosporites-type pollen in situ. However, Renbernia microsporangiophores are more distinctly laminar and have sporangia that are more prominently elongated and with a hood-like apical extension of sterile tissue. The in situ pollen is also much smaller, the pollen wall is much more distinctly perforate-foveolate rather than more or less psilate, and in Renbernia the saccus-like structures are not inflated. The relationship of Brenneria and Renbernia, as well as the possible link between Decussosporites-type pollen and pollen of Eucommiidites (Erdtmanithecales) is discussed.

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  • 150.
    Fuchs, Jerome
    et al.
    Departement Systematique et Evolution, UMR7205 Institut de Systematique, Evolution, Biodiversite CNRS MNHN UPMC EPHE, Sorbonne Universites, Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle, CP 51, 57 rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05, France.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Bonillo, Céline
    Couloux, Arnaud
    Pasquet, Eric
    The complex phylogeography of the Indo-Malayan Alophoixus bulbuls with the description of a putativenew ring species complex2015In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 24, p. 5460-5474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Indo-Malayan bioregion has provided some of the most spectacular discoveries of new vertebrate species (e.g. saola, khanyou, bare-faced bulbul) over the last 25 years. Yet, very little is known about the processes that led to the current biodiversity in this region. We reconstructed the phylogeographic history of a group of closely related passerines, the Alophoixus bulbuls. These birds are continuously distributed in Indo-Malaya around the Thailand lowlands such that their distribution resembles a ring. Our analyses revealed a single colonization event of the mainland from Sundaland with sequential divergence of taxa from southwest to northeast characterized by significant gene flow between parapatric taxa, and reduced or ancient gene flow involving the two taxa at the extremities of the ring. We detected evidence of population expansion in two subspecies, including one that was involved in the closing of the ring. Hence, our analyses indicate that the diversification pattern of Alophoixus bulbuls fits a ring species model driven by geographic isolation. To our knowledge, the Alophoixus bulbuls represent the first case of a putative broken ring species complex in Indo-Malaya. We also discuss the implications of our results on our understanding of the biogeography in Indo-Malaya.

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