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  • 101.
    Dalsätt, Johan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    ZHOU, Zhonge
    Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology; Chinese Academy of Sciences; Beijing 100044 China.
    A New Enantiornithes (Aves) from the Early Cretaceous of China2014In: Acta Geologica Sinica, ISSN 1000-9515, E-ISSN 1755-6724, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 1034-1040Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 102.
    Dalsätt, Johan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Fossil birds from the Miocene and Pliocene of Hambach (NW Germany)2006In: Palaeontographica. Abteilung A, Palaozoologie, Stratigraphie, ISSN 0375-0442, Vol. 277, no 1-6, p. 113-+Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 103.
    D'Aniello, Salvatore
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Evolution of Marine Organisms, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn.
    Delroisse, Jérôme
    Biology of Marine Organisms and Biomimetics, Research Institute for Biosciences, University of Mons.
    Valero-Garcia, Alberto
    Department of Biology and Evolution of Marine Organisms, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn.
    Lowe, Elijah
    Department of Biology and Evolution of Marine Organisms, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn.
    Byrne, Maria
    Schools of Medical and Biological Sciences, The University of Sydney.
    Cannon, Johanna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Halanych, Kenneth
    Auburn University, Department of Biological Sciences.
    Elphick, Maurice
    School of Biological & Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London.
    Mallefet, Jerome
    Laboratory of Marine Biology, Earth and Life Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain.
    Kaul-Strehlow, Sabrina
    Department of Molecular Evolution and Development, University of Vienna.
    Lowe, Christopher
    Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University.
    Flammang, Patrick
    Biology of Marine Organisms and Biomimetics, Research Institute for Biosciences, University of Mons.
    Ullrich-Lutter, Esther
    Museum fuer Naturkunde Berlin.
    Wanniger, Andreas
    Department of Integrative Zoology, University of Vienna.
    Arnone, Maria Ina
    Department of Biology and Evolution of Marine Organisms, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn.
    Opsin evolution in the AmbulacrariaIn: Marine Genomics, ISSN 1874-7787, E-ISSN 1876-7478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opsins — G-protein coupled receptors involved in photoreception — have been extensively studied in the animal kingdom. The present work provides new insights into opsin-based photoreception and photoreceptor cell evo- lution with a first analysis of opsin sequence data for a major deuterostome clade, the Ambulacraria. Systematic data analysis, including for the first time hemichordate opsin sequences and an expanded echinoderm dataset, led to a robust opsin phylogeny for this cornerstone superphylum. Multiple genomic and transcriptomic resources were surveyed to cover each class of Hemichordata and Echinodermata. In total, 119 ambulacrarian opsin sequences were found, 22 new sequences in hemichordates and 97 in echinoderms (including 67 new sequences). We framed the ambulacrarian opsin repertoire within eumetazoan diversity by including selected reference opsins from non-ambulacrarians. Our findings corroborate the presence of all major ancestral bilaterian opsin groups in Ambulacraria. Furthermore, we identified two opsin groups specific to echinoderms. In conclu- sion, a molecular phylogenetic framework for investigating light-perception and photobiological behaviors in marine deuterostomes has been obtained. 

  • 104.
    de Jong, Yde
    et al.
    University of Amsterdam.
    Kouwenberg, Juiana
    Boumans, Louis
    Hussey, Charles
    Hyam, Roger
    Nicolson, Nicola
    Kirk, Paul
    Paton, Alan
    Michel, Ellinor
    Guiry, Michael D,
    Boegh, Phillip S.
    Aerenlund Pedersen, Henrik
    Enghoff, Henrik
    von Raab-Straube, Eckhard
    Güntsch, Anton
    Geoffroy, Marc
    Müller, Andreas
    Kohlbecker, Andreas
    Berendsohn, Walter
    Appeltans, Ward
    Arvantidis, Christos
    Vanhoorne, Bart
    Declerck, Joram
    Vandepitte, Leen
    Hernandez, Francisco
    Nash, Róisín
    Costello, Mark John
    Ouvrard, David
    Bezard-Falgas, Pascale
    Bourgoin, Thierry
    Wetzel, Florian Tobias
    Glöckler, Falko
    Korb, Günther
    Ring, Caroline
    Hagedorn, Gregor
    Häuser, Christoph
    Aktaç, Nihat
    Asan, Ahmet
    Ardelean, Adorian
    Vieira Borges, Paulo Alexandre
    Dhora, Dhimiter
    Khachatryan, Hasmik
    Malicky, Michael
    Ibrahimov, Shaig
    Tuzikov, Alexander
    De Wever, Aike
    Moncheva, Snejana
    Spassov, Nikolai
    Chobot, Karel
    Popov, Alexei
    Borsíc, Igor
    Sfenthourakis, Spyros
    Köljalg, Urmas
    Uotila, Pertti
    Olivier, Gargominy
    Dauvin, Jean-Claude
    Tarkhnishvili, David
    Chaladze, Giorgi
    Tuerkay, Michael
    Legakis, Anastasios
    Peregovits, LáslZó
    Gudmundsson, Gudmundur
    Ólafsson, Erling
    Lysaght, Liam
    Galil, Bella Sarah
    Raimondo, Francesco M.
    Domina, Gianniantonio
    Stoch, Fabio
    Minelli, Alessandro
    Spungis, Voldemars
    Budrys, Eduardas
    Olenin, Sergei
    Turpel, Armand
    Walisch, Tania
    Krpach, Vladimir
    Gambin, Marie Therese
    Ungureano, Laurentia
    Karaman, Gordan
    Kleukers, Roy M. J. C.
    Stur, Elisabeth
    Aagaard, Kaare
    Valland, Nils
    Loennechen Moen, Tori
    Bogdanowicz, Wieslaw
    Tykarski, Piotr
    Wieslawski, Jan Marcin
    Kedra, Monika
    de frias Martins, ntonio M.
    Domingos Abreu, António
    Silva, Ricardo
    Medvedev, Sergei
    Ryss, Alexander
    Simic, Smilijka
    Marhold, Karel
    Stloukal, Eduard
    Tome, Davorin
    Ramos, Marian A.
    Valdés, Benito
    Pina, Francisco
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Anders, Telenius
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Gonseth, Yves
    Tschudin, Pascal
    Sergeyeva, Oleksandra
    Vladymyrov, Volodymyr
    Bogdanovych Rizun, Volodymyr
    Raper, Chris
    Lear, Dan
    Stoev, Pavel
    Penev, Lyubomir
    Casino Rubio, Ana
    Backeljau, Thierry
    Saarenmaa, Hannu
    Ullenberg, Sandrine
    PESI - a taxonomic backbone for Europe2015In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 3, p. 1-51, article id e5848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reliable taxonomy underpins communication in all of biology, not least nature conservation and sustainable use of ecosystem resources. The flexibility of taxonomic interpretations, however, presents a serious challenge for end-users of taxonomic concepts. Users need standardised and continuously harmonised taxonomic reference systems, as well as high-quality and complete taxonomic data sets, but these are generally lacking for non-specialists. The solution is in dynamic, expertly curated web-based taxonomic tools.

    The Pan-European Species-directories Infrastructure (PESI) worked to solve this key issue by providing a taxonomic e-infrastructure for Europe. It strengthened the relevant social (expertise) and information (standards, data and technical) capacities of five major community networks on taxonomic indexing in Europe, which is essential for proper biodiversity assessment and monitoring activities. The key objectives of PESI were: 1) standardisation in taxonomic reference systems, 2) enhancement of the quality and completeness of taxonomic data sets and 3) creation of integrated access to taxonomic information.

    This paper describes the results of PESI and its future prospects, including the involvement in major European biodiversity informatics initiatives and programs.

  • 105. DE LUCENA, CARLOS A. SANTOS
    et al.
    KULLANDER, SVEN
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    NORÉN, MICHAEL
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division. FishBase.
    CALEGARI, BÁRBARA BORGES
    Healing nomenclature: making the names Australoheros mboapari and Australoheros ricani available (Teleostei: Cichlidae)2023In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5306, no 4, p. 497-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A close analysis of a publication effort by the authors of the present paper suggests that they need to issue a clarificationto avoid confusion about the nomenclatural status of two species in the genus Australoheros, also known as chanchitos(‘piglets’).

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  • 106. De Meyer, Marc
    et al.
    Földvari, Mihaly
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Skevington, Jeffrey H.
    61. Pipunculidae2021In: Manual of Afrotropical Diptera. Vol. 3: Brachycera–Cyclorrhapha, excluding Calyptratae / [ed] Kirk-Spriggs, A.H.; Sinclair, B.J., Pretoria: South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) , 2021, p. 1493-1505Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 107. Dean, W. Richard J.
    et al.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Avian type localities and the type specimens collected by Johan August Wahlberg in southern Africa2022In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5134, no 4, p. 521-560Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 108. Dehasque, Marianne
    et al.
    Pečnerová, Patrícia
    Kempe Lagerholm, Vendela
    Ersmark, Erik
    Danilov, Gleb K
    Mortensen, Peter
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vartanyan, Sergey
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Development and Optimization of a Silica Column-Based Extraction Protocol for Ancient DNA2022In: Genes, ISSN 2073-4425, E-ISSN 2073-4425, Vol. 13, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 109.
    Delling, Bo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Evolution and disappearance of sympatric Coregonus albula ina changing environment—A case study of the only remainingpopulation pair in Sweden2019In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 9, no 22, p. 12727-12753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past 50 years, Fennoscandian populations of spring‐spawning Baltic cisco

    (

    Coregonus albula), sympatric to common autumn‐spawners, have declined or disappeared;

    for example, three out of four known spring‐spawning populations in Sweden

    are regarded as extinct. Over the same period, the climate has changed and populations

    have been subject to other anthropogenic stressors. We compared historic

    (1960s) and recent (1990–000s) morphological data from the still‐existent sympatric

    cisco populations in Lake Fegen, Sweden. Phenotypic changes were found for

    spring‐spawners making them more similar to the sympatric autumn‐spawners that

    had remained virtually unchanged. Based on results for other salmoniform fishes,

    a phenotypically plastic response to increased temperature during early development

    appears unlikely. The recent material was also analyzed with microsatellite

    markers; long‐term effective population size in spring‐spawners was estimated to

    be about 20 times lower than autumn‐spawners, with signs of long‐term gene flow

    in both directions and a recent genetic bottleneck in spring‐spawners. We suggest

    the change toward a less distinct phenotype in spring‐spawners to reflect a recent

    increase in gene flow from autumn‐spawners. Time since divergence was estimated

    to only

    c. 1,900 years (95% CI: 400–5,900), but still the Fegen populations represent

    the most morphologically and genetically distinct sympatric populations studied.

    Consequently, we hypothesize that less distinct population pairs can be even

    younger and that spring‐spawning may have repeatedly evolved and disappeared in

    several lakes since the end of the last glaciation, concurrent with changed environmental

    conditions.

  • 110.
    Delling, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Palm, Stefan
    Palkopoulou, Eleftheria
    Prestegaard, Tore
    Genetic signs of multiple colonization events in Baltic ciscoes with radiation into sympatric spring- and autumnspawners confined to early postglacial arrival2014In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 4, no 22, p. 4346-4360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presence of sympatric populations may reflect local diversification or secondary contact of already distinct forms. The Baltic cisco (Coregonus albula) normally spawns in late autumn, but in a few lakes in Northern Europe sympatric autumn and spring- or winter-spawners have been described. So far, the evolutionary relationships and taxonomic status of these main life history forms have remained largely unclear. With microsatellites and mtDNA sequences, we analyzed extant and extinct spring- and autumn-spawners from a total of 23 Swedish localities, including sympatric populations. Published sequences from Baltic ciscoes in Germany and Finland, and Coregonus sardinella from North America were also included together with novel mtDNA sequences from Siberian C. sardinella. A clear genetic structure within Sweden was found that included two population assemblages markedly differentiated at microsatellites and apparently fixed for mtDNA haplotypes from two distinct clades. All sympatric Swedish populations belonged to the same assemblage, suggesting parallel evolution of spring-spawning rather than secondary contact. The pattern observed further suggests that postglacial immigration to Northern Europe occurred from at least two different refugia. Previous results showing that mtDNA in Baltic cisco is paraphyletic with respect to North American C. sardinella were confirmed. However, the inclusion of Siberian C. sardinella revealed a more complicated pattern, as these novel haplotypes were found within one of the two main C. albula clades and were clearly distinct from those in North American C. sardinella. The evolutionary history of Northern Hemisphere ciscoes thus seems to be more complex than previously recognized.

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  • 111.
    Delling, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sabatini, Andrea
    Muracciole, Stephane
    Tougard, Christelle
    Berrebi, Patrick
    Morphologic and genetic characterisation of Corsican and Sardinian trout with comments on Salmo taxonomy2020In: Knowledge & Management of Aquatic EcosystemsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 112.
    Delling, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Thörn, Filip
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Museomics reveals the phylogenetic position of the extinct Moroccan trout Salmo pallaryi2023In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 619-627Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Deprá, Gabriel C.
    et al.
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá.
    Kullander, Sven O.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Pavanelli, Carla S,
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá.
    da Graça, Wefterson J.
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá.
    A new colorful species of Geophagus (Teleostei: Cichlidae), endemic to the rio Aripuanã in the Amazon basin of Brazil2014In: Neotropical Ichthyology, ISSN 1679-6225, E-ISSN 1982-0224, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 737-746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geophagus mirabilis, new species, is endemic to the rio Aripuanã drainage upstream from Dardanelos/Andorinhas falls.The new species is distinguished from all other species of the genus by the presence of one to five large black spots arrangedlongitudinally along the middle of the flank, in addition to the black midlateral spot that is characteristic of species in thegenus and by a pattern of iridescent spots and lines on the head in living specimens. It is further distinguished from allcongeneric species, except G. camopiensis and G. crocatus, by the presence of seven (vs. eight or more) scale rows in thecircumpeduncular series below the lateral line (7 in G. crocatus; 7-9 in G. camopiensis). Including the new species, five cichlids and 11 fish species in total are known only from the upper rio Aripuanã, and 15 fish species in total are known only from the rio Aripuanã drainage

  • 114. Dickinson, Edward C.
    et al.
    Schodde, Richard
    Australian Biological Resources Study.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Chrochet, Pierre André
    Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive.
    Elliott, Andy
    Lynx Edicions.
    Kirwan, Guy M
    Field Museum of Natural History.
    Correcting the "correct" name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher (Aves: Passeriformes, Muscicapidae, Muscicapa)2014In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3869, no 3, p. 343-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Muscicapa dauurica Pallas, 1811 is shown to be an available name and the oldest available name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher

  • 115. Djursvoll, Per
    et al.
    Golovatch, S. I.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Meidell, Bjarne
    Phylogenetic relationships within Polydesmus sensu lato (Diplopoda: Polydesmida)2001In: Fragmenta Faunistica, Vol. 43, p. 37-59Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Dondale, Charles D.
    et al.
    Biodiversity, Researh Branch, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Buckle, Donald J.
    Confirmation of the presence of Xysticus chippewa in Europe (Araneae, Thomisidae)2006In: Bulletin of the British arachnological Society, ISSN 0524-4994, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 361-364Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 117. Drolshagen, B.
    et al.
    Bäckstam, Christian M.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A taxonomic review of the mygalomorph spider genus Linothele Karsch, 1879 (Araneae, Dipluridae).2021In: Zoosystema, ISSN 1280-9551, E-ISSN 1638-9387, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 163-196Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 118. Dulsat-Masvidal, Maria
    et al.
    Lourenço, Rui
    Lacorte, Silvia
    D'Amico, Marcello
    Albayrak, Tamer
    Andevski, Jovan
    Aradis, Arianna
    Baltag, Emanuel
    Berger-Tal, Oded
    Berny, Philippe
    Choresh, Yael
    Duke, Guy
    Espín, Silvia
    García-Fernández, Antonio J.
    Gómez-Ramírez, Pilar
    Hallgrimsson, Gunnar T.
    Jaspers, Veerle
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kovacs, Andras
    Krone, Oliver
    Leivits, Madis
    Martínez-López, Emma
    Mateo, Rafael
    Movalli, Paola
    Sánchez-Virosta, Pablo
    Shore, Richard F.
    Valkama, Jari
    Vrezec, Al
    Xirouchakis, Stavros
    Walker, Lee A.
    Wernham, Chris
    A review of constraints and solutions for collecting raptor samples and contextual data for a European Raptor Biomonitoring Facility2021In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 793, p. 148599-148599, article id 148599Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 119.
    Désamorè, Aurélie
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Laenen, Benjamin
    Miller, Kelly
    University of New Mexico.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Early burst in body size evolution is uncoupled from species diversification in diving beetles (Dytiscidae)2018In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 979-993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in morphology are often thought to be linked to changes in species diversification,

    which is expected to leave a signal of early burst (EB) in phenotypic traits.

    However, such signal is rarely recovered in empirical phylogenies, even for groups

    with well-known adaptive radiation. Using a comprehensive phylogenetic approach

    in Dytiscidae, which harbours ~4,300 species with as much as 50-fold variation in

    body size among them, we ask whether pattern of species diversification correlates

    with morphological evolution. Additionally, we test whether the large variation in

    body size is linked to habitat preference and whether the latter influences species

    turnover. We found, in sharp contrast to most animal groups, that Dytiscidae body

    size evolution follows an early-burst model with subsequent high phylogenetic conservatism.

    However, we found no evidence for associated shifts in species diversification,

    which point to an uncoupled evolution of morphology and species

    diversification. We recovered the ancestral habitat of Dytiscidae as lentic (standing

    water), with many transitions to lotic habitat (running water) that are concomitant

    to a decrease in body size. Finally, we found no evidence for difference in net diversification

    rates between habitats nor difference in turnover in lentic and lotic species.

    This result, together with recent findings in dragonflies, contrasts with some

    theoretical expectations of the habitat stability hypothesis. Thus, a thorough

    reassessment of the impact of dispersal, gene flow and range size on the speciation

    process is needed to fully encompass the evolutionary consequences of the lentic–

    lotic divide for freshwater fauna.

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  • 120. Díez-del-Molino, David
    et al.
    Dehasque, Marianne
    Chacón-Duque, J. Camilo
    Pečnerová, Patrícia
    Tikhonov, Alexei
    Protopopov, Albert
    Plotnikov, Valeri
    Kanellidou, Foteini
    Nikolskiy, Pavel
    Mortensen, Peter
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Danilov, Gleb K.
    Vartanyan, Sergey
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Lister, Adrian M.
    Heintzman, Peter D.
    van der Valk, Tom
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Dalén, Love
    Genomics of adaptive evolution in the woolly mammoth2023In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 33, no 9, p. 1753-1764.e4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 121. Eichsteller, Angelina
    et al.
    Taylor, James
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Brix, Saskia
    Martìnez Arbizu, Pedro
    DNA Barcoding of Cold-Water Coral-Associated Ophiuroid Fauna from the North Atlantic2022In: Diversity, E-ISSN 1424-2818, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 358-358Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 122. Elmqvist, H.
    et al.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Myrlejonsländor2023In: Yrfän, Vol. 2, p. 10-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 123. Elmqvist, Håkan
    et al.
    Nyström, Dennis
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Aiolopus thalassinus (Fabricius, 1781), en nygräshoppa för Norden och en migrerande svärm som korsade Östersjön2020In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 141, no 4, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the first finding of the grasshopper Aiolopus thalassinus (Fabricius, 1781) inthe Nordic countries. Two migrating individuals were attracted to light at a known hotspotof migrating moths near the southernmost tip of Gotland in the Baltic Sea, 8th of August2020. End of September hundreds of individuals had made landfall in a bay not far from thefirst locality. The mass occurrence followed after days of easterly or southeasterly winds,a strengthened high pressure over Russia, and an early morning with low-lying clouds.Aiolopus thalassinus is a long-winged grasshopper with strong flight capacity and a widedistribution across the Old World. It also shares some of the density-dependent behavioraland physiological characteristics of the migratory locusts. In Europe the northern continuousdistribution limit stretches through south Germany and middle Poland. The findings onGotland follow the first record in Lithuania, 2019, and a recent trend of expanding rangein south Germany which indicates a species expanding its distribution due to a changingclimate. The findings also show that this is a species capable of swarm migration and crossinga minimum of 170 km of open sea when winds are favorable.

  • 124. Englund, William
    et al.
    Njoroge, Laban
    Biström, Olof
    Miller, Kelly
    University of New Mexico.
    Bilton, David
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Taxonomic revision of the Afrotropical Agabus raffrayi species group with the description of four new species (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae)2020In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 963, p. 45-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We revise the Afrotropical Agabus raffrayi species group, motivated by the discovery of new diversity in Kenya and South Africa. Whilst Agabus is mainly a holarctic genus, the Agabus raffrayi group is restricted to high altitude regions of eastern Africa and temperate parts of South Africa, from where we describe the southernmost Agabus in the world. The following new species are introduced: Agabus anguluverpus sp. nov. from Mount Kenya in central Kenya, Agabus austellus sp. nov. a widespread species in South Africa, Agabus riberae sp. nov. from the Kamiesberg and northeastern Cederberg ranges in the Northern and Western Cape Provinces of South Africa and Agabus agulhas sp. nov. from the Agulhas Plain, Western Cape Province, South Africa. We provide a distribution map, a determination key for males, quantitative measurements of diagnostic characters, habitus photos and detailed photos of male genitalia for all described species in the group, as well as images of diagnostic characters and habitats. The presence or absence of an elongated section between the subapical broadening and the base of the apical and subapical teeth of the male aedeagus is a useful novel character, first revealed by our study. In contrast with the most recent revision of Afrotropical Agabus, we show that Agabus ruwenzoricus Guignot, 1936 is restricted to eastern Africa; South African records of this species having been based on misidentifications, no species of the group being common to southern and eastern Africa. We speculate that the raffrayi group may display phylogenetic niche conservatism, being restricted, as an originally temperate taxon, to higher elevations in tropical eastern Africa, but occurring at lower altitudes in temperate South Africa.

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  • 125.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Anderson, Cajsa L
    Britton, Tom
    Elzanowski, Andrzej
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Källersjö, Mari
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Parsons, Thomas J
    Zuccon, Dario
    Mayr, Gerald
    Diversification of Neoaves: integration of molecular sequence data and fossils.2006In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 543-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patterns of diversification and timing of evolution within Neoaves, which includes almost 95% of all bird species, are virtually unknown. On the other hand, molecular data consistently indicate a Cretaceous origin of many neoavian lineages and the fossil record seems to support an Early Tertiary diversification. Here, we present the first well-resolved molecular phylogeny for Neoaves, together with divergence time estimates calibrated with a large number of stratigraphically and phylogenetically well-documented fossils. Our study defines several well-supported clades within Neoaves. The calibration results suggest that Neoaves, after an initial split from Galloanseres in Mid-Cretaceous, diversified around or soon after the K/T boundary. Our results thus do not contradict palaeontological data and show that there is no solid molecular evidence for an extensive pre-Tertiary radiation of Neoaves.

  • 126.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Christidis, Les
    Cooper, Alan
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Jackson, Jennifer
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Norman, Janette A
    A Gondwanan origin of passerine birds supported by DNA sequences of the endemic New Zealand wrens.2002In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 269, no 1488, p. 235-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zoogeographic, palaeontological and biochemical data support a Southern Hemisphere origin for passerine birds, while accumulating molecular data suggest that most extant avian orders originated in the mid-Late Cretaceous. We obtained DNA sequence data from the nuclear c-myc and RAG-1 genes of the major passerine groups and here we demonstrate that the endemic New Zealand wrens (Acanthisittidae) are the sister taxon to all other extant passerines, supporting a Gondwanan origin and early radiation of passerines. We propose that (i) the acanthisittids were isolated when New Zealand separated from Gondwana (ca. 82-85 Myr ago), (ii) suboscines, in turn, were derived from an ancestral lineage that inhabited western Gondwana, and (iii) the ancestors of the oscines (songbirds) were subsequently isolated by the separation of Australia from Antarctica. The later spread of passerines into the Northern Hemisphere reflects the northward migration of these former Gondwanan elements.

  • 127.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Evolution, biogeography, and patterns of diversification in passerine birds2003In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 3-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper summarizes and discusses the many new insights into passerine evolution gained from an increased general interest in avian evolution among biologists, and particularly from the extensive use of DNA sequence data in phylogenetic reconstruction. The sister group relationship between the New Zealand rifleman and all other passerines, indicates the importance of the former southern supercontinent Gondwana in the earliest evolution of this group. Following the break-up of Gondwana, the ancestors of other major passerine groups became isolated in Australia (oscines), South America (New World suboscines), and possibly, the then connected Kerguelen Plateau/India/Madagascar tectonic plates (Old World suboscines). The oscines underwent a significant radiation in the Australo-Papuan region and only a few oscine lineages have spread further than to the nearby Southeast Asia. A remarkable exception is the ancestor to the vast Passerida radiation, which now comprises 35% of all bird species. This group obviously benefitted greatly from the increased diversity in plant seed size and morphology during the Tertiary. The lyrebirds (and possibly scrub-birds) constitute the sister group to all other oscines, which renders “Corvida” (sensu Sibley and Ahlquist 1990) paraphyletic. Sequence data suggests that Passerida, the other clade of oscines postulated based on the results of DNA–DNA hybridizations, is monophyletic, and that the rockfowl and rock-jumpers are the most basal members of this clade. The suboscines in the Old World (Eurylamides) and the New World (Tyrannides), respectively, are sister groups. A provisional, working classification of the passerines is presented based on the increased understanding of the major patterns of passerine evolution.

  • 128.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Jansén, Anna-Lee
    Stockholms universitet.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ekman, Jan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Inter-generic relationships of the crows, jays, magpies and allied groups (Aves: Corvidae) based on nucleotide sequence data2005In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 222-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships were studied based on DNA sequences obtained from all recognized genera of the family Corvidae sensu stricto. The aligned data set consists 2589 bp obtained from one mitochondrial and two nuclear genes. Maximum parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and Bayesian inference analyses were used to estimate phylogenetic relationships. The analyses were done for each gene separately, as well as for all genes combined. An analysis of a taxonomically expanded data set of cytochrome b sequences was performed in order to infer the phylogenetic positions of six genera for which nuclear genes could not be obtained. Monophyly of the Corvidae is supported by all analyses, as well as by the occurrence of a deletion of 16 bp in the β-fibrinogen intron in all ingroup taxa. Temnurus and Pyrrhocorax are placed as the sister group to all other corvids, while Cissa and Urocissa appear as the next clade inside them. Further up in the tree, two larger and well-supported clades of genera were recovered by the analyses. One has an entirely New World distribution (the New World jays), while the other includes mostly Eurasian (and one African) taxa. Outside these two major clades are Cyanopica and Perisoreus whose phylogenetic positions could not be determined by the present data. A biogeographic analysis of our data suggests that the Corvidae underwent an initial radiation in Southeast Asia. This is consistent with the observation that almost all basal clades in the phylogenetic tree consist of species adapted to tropical and subtropical forest habitats.

  • 129.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Phylogeny of Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes) based on nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data.2003In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 126-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Passerida is a monophyletic group of oscine passerines that includes almost 3500 species (about 36%) of all bird species in the world. The current understanding of higher-level relationships within Passerida is based on DNA-DNA hybridizations [C.G. Sibley, J.E. Ahlquist, Phylogeny and Classification of Birds, 1990, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT]. Our results are based on analyses of 3130 aligned nucleotide sequence data obtained from 48 ingroup and 13 outgroup genera. Three nuclear genes were sequenced: c-myc (498-510 bp), RAG-1 (930 bp), and myoglobin (693-722 bp), as well one mitochondrial gene; cytochrome b (879 bp). The data were analysed by parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and Bayesian inference. The African rockfowl and rockjumper are found to constitute the deepest branch within Passerida, but relationships among the other taxa are poorly resolved--only four major clades receive statistical support. One clade corresponds to Passeroidea of [C.G. Sibley, B.L. Monroe, Distribution and Taxonomy of Birds of the World, 1990, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT] and includes, e.g., flowerpeckers, sunbirds, accentors, weavers, estrilds, wagtails, finches, and sparrows. Starlings, mockingbirds, thrushes, Old World flycatchers, and dippers also group together in a clade corresponding to Muscicapoidea of Sibley and Monroe [op. cit.]. Monophyly of their Sylvioidea could not be corroborated--these taxa falls either into a clade with wrens, gnatcatchers, and nuthatches, or one with, e.g., warblers, bulbuls, babblers, and white-eyes. The tits, penduline tits, and waxwings belong to Passerida but have no close relatives among the taxa studied herein.

  • 130.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Parsons, Thomas J.
    Erratum: Major divisions of oscines revealed by insertions in the nuclear gene c-myc: A novel gene in avian phylogenetics (vol 117, pg 1077, 2000)2001In: The AUK: A Quarterly Journal of Ornithology, ISSN 0004-8038, E-ISSN 1938-4254, Vol. 118, no 2, p. 563-563Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Parsons, Thomas J.
    Major divisions in oscines revealed by insertions in the nuclear gene c-myc: A novel gene in avian phylogenetics2000In: The AUK: A Quarterly Journal of Ornithology, ISSN 0004-8038, E-ISSN 1938-4254, Vol. 117, no 4, p. 1069-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 132.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Parsons, Thomas J.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Morphological and molecular support for non-monophyly of the Galloanserae2001In: New Perspectives on the Origin and Evolution of Birds: Proceedings of the International Symposium in Honor of John H. Ostrom / [ed] Gauthier, J. & Gall, L.F., New Haven: Yale University, 2001, p. 157-168Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Blom, Mozes P. K.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    A genomic perspective of the pink-headed duck Rhodonessa caryophyllacea suggests a long history of low effective population size2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 16853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for the possibly extinct pink-headed duck Rhodonessa caryophyllacea unambiguously shows that it belongs to the pochard radiation that also includes the genera Aythya and Netta. It is the sister to all modern-day pochards and belongs to a lineage that branched off from the others more than 2.8 million years ago. Rhodonessa caryophyllacea is believed to never have been common in modern time and we show this has probably been the situation for as long as 100,000 years. Our results suggest that their effective population size varied between 15,000 and 25,000 individuals during the last 150,000 years of the Pleistocene. The reasons behind this are largely unknown as very little is known about the life-history and biology of this species. Presumably it is due to factors related to feeding or to breeding, but we may never know this for sure.

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  • 134.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Alvarenga, Herculano
    Prum, Richard O
    Higher-level phylogeny and morphological evolution of tyrant flycatchers, cotingas, manakins, and their allies (Aves: Tyrannida).2006In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 471-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increased understanding of higher-level relationships in passerine birds in the last 15 years, the taxonomic boundaries and phylogenetic interrelationships of the major groups of the Tyrannida (including the cotingas, manakins, tityrines, and tyrant flycatchers) remain unclear. Here, we present an analysis of DNA sequence data obtained from two nuclear exons, three introns, and one mitochondrial gene for 26 genera of Tyrannida and 6 tracheophone outgroups. The analysis resulted in well-supported hypotheses about the earliest evolution within Tyrannida. The Cotingidae, Pipridae, Tityrinae (sensu) [Prum, R.O., Rice, N.H., Mobley, J.A., Dimmick, W.W., 2000. A preliminary phylogenetic hypothesis for the cotingas (Cotingidae) based on mitochondrial DNA. Auk 117, 236-241], Tyrannidae, and the tyrannid subfamiles Tyranninae and Pipromorphinae (sensu) [Sibley, C.G., Monroe, B. L. Jr., 1990. Distribution and Taxonomy of Birds of the World. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT] were all found to be reciprocally monophyletic (given the present taxon sampling). The Cotingidae and Pipridae form a clade that is the sister group to a well-supported clade including Oxyruncus, the Tityrinae, Piprites, and the Tyrannidae. Oxyruncus is the sister group to the Tityrinae, and Piprites is placed as the sister group to the Tyrannidae. The tyrannid subfamilies Tyranninae and Pipromorphinae are monophyletic sister taxa, but the relationships of Platyrinchus mystaceus to these two clades remains ambiguous. The presence of medial (=internal) cartilages in the syrinx is a synapomorphy for the Oxyruncus-Tityrinae-Piprites-Tyrannidae clade. Although morphological synapomorphies currently support the monophyly of both the Pipridae and the Cotingidae, convergences and/or reversals in morphological character states are common in Tyrannida. The relationship between Oxyruncus and the Tityrinae is congruent with additional syringeal synapomorphies and allozyme distance data. Accordingly, we propose the recognition the family Tityridae within the Tyrannida to include the genera Schiffornis, Laniisoma, Laniocera, Iodopleura, Xenopsaris, Pachyramphus, Tityra, and Oxyruncus.

  • 135.
    Erséus, Christer
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ida, Envall
    Pierre, De Wit
    Gustavsson, Lena
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Molecular data reveal a tropical freshwater origin of Naidinae (Annelida, Clitellata, Naididae)2017In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, ISSN 1055-7903, Vol. 115, p. 115-127Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 136. Ervik, Finn
    et al.
    Renner, Susanne
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Breeding system and pollination of Nuphar lutea in Norway1995In: Flora, Vol. 190, p. 109-113Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 137. Farris, James S.
    et al.
    Källersjö, Mari
    Crowe, Timothy M.
    Lipscomb, Diana
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Frigatebirds, Tropicbirds and Ciconiida: Excesses of Confidence Probability1999In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 138. Fatemi, Yaser
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Annotated species list of Ophiuroidea (Echinodermata) from the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman, with new records2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4711, no 1, p. 77-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Fedosov, Alexander
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Tucci, Carmen Federica
    Kantor, Yuri
    Farhat, Sarah
    Puillandre, Nicolas
    Collaborative Expression: Transcriptomics of Conus virgo Suggests Contribution of Multiple Secretory Glands to Venom Production2023In: Journal of Molecular Evolution, ISSN 0022-2844, E-ISSN 1432-1432, Vol. 91, p. 837-853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Venomous marine gastropods of the family Conidae are among the most diversifed predators in marine realm—in large due to their complex venoms. Besides being a valuable source of bioactive neuropeptides conotoxins, cone-snails venoms are an excellent model for molecular evolution studies, addressing origin of key innovations. However, these studies are handicapped by scarce current knowledge on the tissues involved in venom production, as it is generally assumed the sole prerogative of the venom gland (VG). The role of other secretory glands that are present in all Conus species (salivary gland, SG) or only in some species (accessory salivary gland, ASG) remains poorly understood. Here, for the frst time, we carry out a detailed analysis of the VG, SG, and ASG transcriptomes in the vermivorous Conus virgo. We detect multiple transcripts clusters in both the SG and ASG, whose annotations imply venom-related functions. Despite the subsets of transcripts highly-expressed in the VG, SG, and ASG being very distinct, SG expresses an L-, and ASG—Cerm08-, and MEFRR- superfamily conotoxins, all previously considered specifc for VG. We corroborate our results with the analysis of published SG and VG transcriptomes from unrelated fsh-hunting C. geographus, and C. striatus, possibly fsh-hunting C. rolani, and worm-hunting Conus quercinus. In spite of low expression levels of conotoxins, some other specifc clusters of putative venom-related peptides are present and may be highly expressed in the SG of these species. Further functional studies are necessary to determine the role that these peptides play in envenomation. In the meantime, our results show importance of routine multi-tissue sampling both for accurate interpretation of tissue-specifc venom composition in cone-snails, and for better understanding origin and evolution of venom peptides genes.

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  • 140. Fernandez, Diana E.
    et al.
    Giachetti, Luciana
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Thuy, Ben
    Perez, Damian E.
    Comerio, Marcos
    Pazos, Pablo J.
    Brittle stars from the Lower Cretaceous of Patagonia: first ophiuroid articulated remains for the Mesozoic of South America2019In: Andean Geology, ISSN 0718-7092, E-ISSN 0718-7106, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 421-432Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 141.
    Fernholm, Bo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Riksmuseet och Riksmusei Vänner2015In: Biologen Tidskrift för Biologilärarnas förening, ISSN 0345-1127, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 8-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 142.
    Fernholm, Bo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Riksmuseet, Riksmusei Vänner och Malaise2015In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 136, no 4, p. 139-142Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En regnig och blåsig höstdag den 13 november1916 invigde kung Gustav V Naturhistoriskariksmuseets nya lokaler i Frescati, en monumentalbyggnad på granitsockel med mörkt rött tegeli fasaderna (Fig. 1). Den fantastiska kupolenmed sitt koppartak och glas har nyligen genomgripanderenoverats och framträder i skick somnytt. I kupolen var det tänkt att en Foucault´spendel skulle hänga. Diskussioner om pendelnhar nyligen åter initierats av Riksmusei vänner.De rikliga utsmyckningarna är värda att tittaefter. De flesta missar nog tyvärr de två bamsigabjörnungarna som pryder entrén från stora vägennär museet fått nya infarter. Samma år utkom boken”Naturhistoriska riksmuseets historia, Dessuppkomst och utveckling” utgiven av KungligaVetenskapsakademien. Boken kan sägas varasamlingarnas historia. Där beskrivs hur museetär årsbarn med Vetenskapsakademien, som närden grundades 1739 av bl. a. Linné också inrättadeett skåp för naturalier. Av den anledningenfirade Naturhistoriska riksmuseet sitt 250 års jubileummed pompa och ståt år 1989.Mindre än ett decennium efter att NaturhistoriskaRiksmuseet flyttade till Frescati, år 1925,bildades föreningen Riksmusei Vänner somstödjer museet på många olika vis. Vi vill medden här artikeln dels informera om föreningenoch uppmuntra till medlemsskap, dels beskrivaföreningens koppling till svensk entomologi ochsärskilt Renè Malaise.

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  • 143.
    Fernholm, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kumar, Biju
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    First record of hagfish (Cyclostomata: Myxinidae) in Indian waters2017In: Journal of Threatened Taxa, ISSN 0974-7893, E-ISSN 0974-7907, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 10365-10368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One specimen of hag fish Eptatretus sp. was collected from the Arabian Sea, off Kerala coast of India at 500-600 m depth. The phylogenetic analysis using the sequence of mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase C (CO1) suggested the Eptatretus sp. collected from India is distinct from all other species where sequence data is available and P ID (Liberal) for Eptatretus sp. collected from India is 0.96, indicating a high probability that an unknown member of the putative species would be correctly identified as a member once more specimens are collected.

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  • 144.
    Fernholm, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Mincarone, Michael Maia
    Instituto de Biodiversidade e Sustentabilidade Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Macaé Brazil;Schmid College of Science and Technology Chapman University Orange California USA.
    A new species of the hagfish genus Eptatretus (Myxinidae) from the Bahamas, western North Atlantic2023In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 102, no 4, p. 962-967Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 145.
    Fernholm, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kullander, Sven O.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Quattrini, Andrea M.
    Zintzen, Vincent
    Roberts, Clive D.
    Mok, Hin-Kiu
    Kuo, Chien-Hsien
    Hagfish phylogeny and taxonomy, with description of the new genus Rubicundus (Craniata, Myxinidae)2013In: Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, ISSN 0947-5745, E-ISSN 1439-0469, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 296-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent phylogenetic analysis of the Myxinidae based on the 16S rRNA gene resulted in synonymization of Paramyxine with Eptatretus. This created homonymy of Paramyxine fernholmi with Eptatretus fernholmi and Paramyxine wisneri with Eptatretus wisneri. In order to resolve this nomenclatural dilemma, we made a more extensive phylogenetic assessment of the Myxinidae and examined the nomenclature of the family. We used 75 sequences (37 of which new for this study) of a 561 bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene, representing 33 species, and 72 sequences (37 of which new for this study) of a 687 bp fragment of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, representing 23 species, to reconstruct the phylogeny of Myxinidae. The monophyly of the subfamily Myxininae, traditionally characterized by having a single pair of external gill openings, was rejected (0.50 Bayesian posterior probability) by the 16S analysis, but supported by the COI and combined COI+16S analyses (0.99 and 0.81 Bpp, respectively). The monophyly of the subfamily Eptatretinae, characterized by having several pairs of external gill openings, was not supported by the 16S analysis and rejected by the COI and combined COI+16S analysis due to the placement of Eptatretus lopheliae as the earliest branch of Myxinidae (0.71 and 0.57 Bpp, respectively). Eptatretus lopheliae and Eptatretus rubicundus formed a monophyletic group and were allocated to a new genus, Rubicundus, characterized by the presence of an elongated tubular nostril and reddish coloration. A new monotypic subfamily, Rubicundinae, was proposed for Rubicundus. The synonymy of the genera Paramyxine and Quadratus with Eptatretus was confirmed. E. fernholmi is renamed Eptatretus luzonicus. Eptatretus wisneri was renamed Eptatretus bobwisneri. Petromyzon cirrhatus Forster, 1801, Homea banksii Fleming, 1822, and Bdellostoma forsteri Müller, 1836 are synonyms, but no type specimens are known to exist. Petromyzon cirrhatus was designated as type species of Eptatretus, conserving present usage. Gastrobranchus dombeyi Shaw, 1804 has priority over other names for Chilean myxinids. Bdellostoma stoutii was designated as type species of Polistotrema Gill. The validity of the Western Atlantic Myxine limosa as distinct from the Eastern Atlantic Myxine glutinosa was confirmed.

  • 146.
    Fernholm, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Polanco Fernandez, Andrea
    A New Species of Hagfish (Myxinidae: Eptatretus) from the Colombian Caribbean2014In: Copeia, Vol. 3, p. 530-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eptatretus aceroi, new species, is described from one specimen captured on the upper continental slope in ColombianCaribbean waters at 705 m depth. The species can be distinguished from all congeners by having five gill apertures, 3/2multicuspid teeth in the outer and inner tooth rows, respectively, an extremely slender body with the depth at thevertical through the pharyngocutaneous aperture 2.4% of the total length, and by having a total of 174 slime pores, thehighest count in the genus. The species is compared with the other western Atlantic five-gilled species of Eptatretus.

  • 147. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Alström, Per
    Olsson, Urban
    Cibois, Alice
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Chapter 11 Superfamily Sylvioidea: the Old World warblers and their allies.2020In: The Largest Avian Radiation. The Evolution of Perching Birds or the Order Passeriformes, Barcelona: Lynx Edicions , 2020Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 148. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Three new bird family names2015In: Bird Families of the World / [ed] Winkler, D.W., Billerman, S.M. & Lovette, I.J., Barcelona: Lynx Edicions , 2015, p. 33-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 149. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Lokugalappatti, L.G. Sampath
    Bowie, Rauri
    Diversification of African greenbuls in space and time: linking ecological and historical processes2007In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 148, no suppl. 2, p. 359-367Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 150. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Sapayoa aenigma: a New World representative of 'Old World suboscines'.2003In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 270 Suppl 2, p. S238-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Passerine birds are very plastic in their adaptations, which has made it difficult to define phylogenetic lineages and correctly allocate all species to these. Sapayoa aenigma, a member of the large group of New World flycatchers, has been difficult to place, and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments have indicated that it may have been misplaced. This is confirmed here, as base sequencing of two nuclear genes places it as a deep branch in the group of broadbills and pittas of the Old World tropics. The peculiar distribution of this lineage may be best explained in terms of a Gondwanic and Late Cretaceous origin of the passerine birds, as this particular lineage dispersed from the Antarctic landmass, reaching the Old World tropics via the drifting Indian plate, and South America via the West Antarctic Peninsula.

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