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  • 201.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Heinrichs, Jochen
    Schmidt, Alexander R.
    Bryophytes of the Burmese amber forest: Amending and expanding the circumscription of the Cretaceous moss genus Vetiplanaxis2014In: Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, ISSN 0034-6667, E-ISSN 1879-0615, Vol. 209, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 202.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Kuznetsova, Oxana I.
    Ignatov, Michael S.
    A revision of the genus Tomentypnum (Amblystegiaceae) in northern Eurasia2020In: The Bryologist, ISSN 0007-2745, E-ISSN 1938-4378, Vol. 123, p. 377-395Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 203.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Reisborg, C.
    Hallingbäck, T.
    Nationalnyckeln till Sveriges flora och fauna. Bladmossor: Skirmossor-baronmossor. Bryophyta: Hookeria-Anomodon2014Book (Refereed)
  • 204. Heinrichs, Jochen
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Schäfer-Verwimp, Alfons
    Feldberg, Kathrin
    Schmidt, Alexander R.
    An in situ preserved moss community in Eocene Baltic amber2014In: Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, ISSN 0034-6667, E-ISSN 1879-0615, Vol. 210, p. 113-118Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 205. Hodgetts, Nick
    et al.
    Söderström, Lars
    Blockeel, T. L.
    Caspari, S.
    Ignatov, Michael S.
    Konstantinova, N. A.
    Lockhart, N.
    Papp, Beáta
    Schröck, Christian
    Sim-Sim, Manuela
    Bell, D.
    Bell, N. E.
    Blom, Hans H.
    Bruggeman-Nannenga, Maria Alida
    Brugués, M.
    Enroth, Johannes
    Flatberg, K. I.
    Garilleti, R.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Holyoak, D. T.
    Hugonnot, V.
    Kariyawasam, I.
    Köckinger, Heribert
    Kučera, Jan
    Lara, F.
    Porley, R. D.
    An annotated checklist of bryophytes of Europe, Macaronesia and Cyprus2020In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 42, p. 1-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 206. Holien, H
    et al.
    Prieto, Maria
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Interesting lichenized and lichenicolous fungi found during the Nordic Lichen Society excursion in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway 20152016In: Graphis Scripta, ISSN 0901-7593, Vol. 20, p. 40-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 207. Holmgren, Sandra
    et al.
    Angus, Robert
    Jia, Fenglong
    Chen, Zhen-Ning
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Resolving the taxonomic conundrum in Graphoderus of the east Palearctic with a key to all species (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae).2016In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, no 574, p. 113-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Holarctic diving beetle genus Graphoderus (Dytiscinae, Aciliini) contains relatively few and well-known species but these may still be difficult to identify based on external characters. A taxonomic problem in the eastern Palearctic was discovered that relates to the Palearctic Graphoderus zonatus (Hoppe, 1795) and the Nearctic Graphoderus perplexus Sharp, 1882. Based on qualitative and quantitative characters, especially on male genitalia which have been poorly studied in the past, it is shown that eastern Palearctic specimens identified by previous authors as either of the two species in fact belongs to a third species. The synonymized name Graphoderus elatus Sharp, 1882, is reinstated as a valid species (stat. n.) and a lectotype is designated from the mixed syntype series. The male genitalia of all known Graphoderus species have been examined and an illustrated identification key to the genus is provided. The three species in the complex of focus, Graphoderus elatus, Graphoderus zonatus and Graphoderus perplexus are found to have allopatric distributions; Graphoderus perplexus in the Nearctic region, Graphoderus zonatus in the west Palearctic region and eastwards to the Yenisei-Angara river and Graphoderus elatus east of the Yenisei-Angara river. All previous records of either Graphoderus zonatus or Graphoderus perplexus in the east Palearctic, east of the Yenisei-Angara river turned out to be misidentified Graphoderus elatus. This conclusion also brings with it that dimorphic females, thought only to be present in the single subspecies Graphoderus zonatus verrucifer (CR Sahlberg, 1824), proved to be present also in a second species, Graphoderus elatus. The dimorphic female forms is either with dorsally smooth elytra and pronotum or conspicuously granulated elytra and wrinkly pronotum. As has been shown in Graphoderus zonatus verrucifer there is a correlation between the occurrence of granulate female forms in a population and an increase in the number of adhesive discs on pro- and mesotarsus in males within Graphoderus elatus.

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  • 208.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Campydoroides manautei gen. et sp. nov. from New Caledonia and reappraisal of suborder Campydorina (Nematoda)2019In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 518, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 209. Houshuai, Wang
    et al.
    Wahlberg, Niklas
    Holloway, Jeremy D
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Fan, Xiaoling
    Janzen, Daniel H
    Hallwachs, Winnie
    Wen, Lijun
    Wang, Min
    Nylin, Sören
    Stockholm University.
    Molecular phylogeny of Lymantriinae (Lepidoptera, Noctuoidea, Erebidae) inferred from eight gene regions2015In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 579-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To understand the evolutionary history of Lymantriinae and test the present higher-level classification, we performed the first broad-scale molecular phylogenetic analysis of the subfamily, based on 154 exemplars representing all recognized tribes and drawn from all major biogeographical regions. We used two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and 16S ribosomal RNA) and six nuclear genes (elongation factor-1α, carbamoylphosphate synthase domain protein, ribosomal protein S5, cytosolic malate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and wingless). Data matrices (in total 5424 bp) were analysed by parsimony and model-based evolutionary methods (maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference). Based on the results of the analyses, we present a new phylogenetic classification for Lymantriinae composed of seven well-supported tribes, two of which are proposed here as new: Arctornithini, Leucomini, Lymantriini, Orgyiini, Nygmiini, Daplasini trib. nov. and Locharnini trib. nov. We discuss the internal structure of each of these tribes and address some of the more complex problems with the genus-level classification, particularly within Orgyiini and Nygmiini.

  • 210. Hugunnot, Vincent
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Arvernella microclada Hugonnot & Hedenäs (Amblystegiaceae), a new minute species from France, requiring a separate genus2015In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 37, p. 184-191Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 211. Huttunen, Sanna
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Ignatov, Michael S.
    Phylogenetic position of Homalothecium laevisetum and relationship with the genus Palamocladium2018In: Arctoa: A Journal of Briology, ISSN 0131-1379, Vol. 27, p. 91-103Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 212.
    Häggqvist, Sibylle
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ulefors, Sven Olof
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    A new species group in Megaselia, the lucifrons group, with description of a new species (Diptera, Phoridae)2015In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 512, p. 89-108Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 213.
    Höhna, Sebastian
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Heath, Tracy A.
    Boussau, Bastien
    Landis, Michael J.
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Huelsenbeck, John P.
    Probabilistic graphical model representation in phylogenetics2014In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 753-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen a rapid expansion of the model space explored in statistical phylogenetics, emphasizing the need for new approaches to statistical model representation and software development. Clear communication and representation of the chosen model is crucial for: (i) reproducibility of an analysis, (ii) model development, and (iii) software design. Moreover, a unified, clear and understandable framework for model representation lowers the barrier for beginners and nonspecialists to grasp complex phylogenetic models, including their assumptions and parameter/variable dependencies. Graphical modeling is a unifying framework that has gained in popularity in the statistical literature in recent years. The core idea is to break complex models into conditionally independent distributions. The strength lies in the comprehensibility, flexibility, and adaptability of this formalism, and the large body of computational work based on it. Graphical models are well-suited to teach statistical models, to facilitate communication among phylogeneticists and in the development of generic software for simulation and statistical inference. Here, we provide an introduction to graphical models for phylogeneticists and extend the standard graphical model representation to the realm of phylogenetics. We introduce a new graphical model component, tree plates, to capture the changing structure of the subgraph corresponding to a phylogenetic tree. We describe a range of phylogenetic models using the graphical model framework and introduce modules to simplify the representation of standard components in large and complex models. Phylogenetic model graphs can be readily used in simulation, maximum likelihood inference, and Bayesian inference using, for example, Metropolis–Hastings or Gibbs sampling of the posterior distribution.

  • 214. Ignatov, Michael S.
    et al.
    Kučera, Jan
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Kuznetsova, Oxana I.
    Ignatova, Elena A.
    A revision of the genus Orthothecium (Plagiotheciaceae, Bryophyta) in northern Eurasia2020In: Arctoa: A Journal of Briology, ISSN 0131-1379, Vol. 29, p. 10-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 215.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Batalha-Filho, Henrique
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Christidis, Les
    Schodde, Richard
    Phylogeny, biogeography and taxonomic consequences in a bird-of-paradise species complex, Lophorina–Ptiloris (Aves: Paradisaeidae)2017In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 181, p. 439-470Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fabre, Pierre-Henri
    Batalha-Filho, Henrique
    Jønsson, Knud A
    Roselaar, Cees S
    Sangster, George
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    The spatio-temporal colonization and diversification across the Indo-Pacific by a 'great speciator' (Aves, Erythropitta erythrogaster).2013In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 280, no 1759, p. 20130309-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Indo-Pacific region has arguably been the most important area for the formulation of theories about biogeography and speciation, but modern studies of the tempo, mode and magnitude of diversification across this region are scarce. We study the biogeographic history and characterize levels of diversification in the wide-ranging passerine bird Erythropitta erythrogaster using molecular, phylogeographic and population genetics methods, as well as morphometric and plumage analyses. Our results suggest that E. erythrogaster colonized the Indo-Pacific during the Pleistocene in an eastward direction following a stepping stone pathway, and that sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene may have promoted gene flow only locally. A molecular species delimitation test suggests that several allopatric island populations of E. erythrogaster may be regarded as species. Most of these putative new species are further characterized by diagnostic differences in plumage. Our study reconfirms the E. erythrogaster complex as a 'great speciator': it represents a complex of up to 17 allopatrically distributed, reciprocally monophyletic and/or morphologically diagnosable species that originated during the Pleistocene. Our results support the view that observed latitudinal gradients of genetic divergence among avian sister species may have been affected by incomplete knowledge of taxonomic limits in tropical bird species.

  • 217.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Convergent evolution, habitat shifts and variable diversification rates in the ovenbird-woodcreeper family (Furnariidae).2009In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 9, p. 268-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Neotropical ovenbird-woodcreeper family (Furnariidae) is an avian group characterized by exceptionally diverse ecomorphological adaptations. For instance, members of the family are known to construct nests of a remarkable variety. This offers a unique opportunity to examine whether changes in nest design, accompanied by expansions into new habitats, facilitates diversification. We present a multi-gene phylogeny and age estimates for the ovenbird-woodcreeper family and use these results to estimate the degree of convergent evolution in both phenotype and habitat utilisation. Furthermore, we discuss whether variation in species richness among ovenbird clades could be explained by differences in clade-specific diversification rates, and whether these rates differ among lineages with different nesting habits. In addition, the systematic positions of some enigmatic ovenbird taxa and the postulated monophyly of some species-rich genera are evaluated.

    RESULTS: The phylogenetic results reveal new examples of convergent evolution and show that ovenbirds have independently colonized open habitats at least six times. The calculated age estimates suggest that the ovenbird-woodcreeper family started to diverge at ca 33 Mya, and that the timing of habitat shifts into open environments may be correlated with the aridification of South America during the last 15 My. The results also show that observed large differences in species richness among clades can be explained by a substantial variation in net diversification rates. The synallaxines, which generally are adapted to dry habitats and build exposed vegetative nests, had the highest diversification rate of all major furnariid clades.

    CONCLUSION: Several key features may have played an important role for the radiation and evolution of convergent phenotypes in the ovenbird-woodcreeper family. Our results suggest that changes in nest building strategy and adaptation to novel habitats may have played an important role in a diversification that included multiple radiations into more open and bushy environments. The synallaxines were found to have had a particularly high diversification rate, which may be explained by their ability to build exposed vegetative nests and thus to expand into a variety of novel habitats that emerged during a period of cooling and aridification in South America.

  • 218.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Evolution of the ovenbird-woodcreeper assemblage(Aves: Furnariidae) - major shifts in nest architecture and adaptive radiation2006In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 260-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neotropical ovenbirds (Furnariidae) form an extraordinary morphologically and ecologically diverse passerine radiation, which includes many examples of species that are superficially similar to other passerine birds as a resulting from their adaptations to similar lifestyles. The ovenbirds further exhibits a truly remarkable variation in nest types, arguably approaching that found in the entire passerine clade. Herein we present a genus-level phylogeny of ovenbirds based on both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA including a more complete taxon sampling than in previous molecular studies of the group. The phylogenetic results are in good agreement with earlier molecular studies of ovenbirds, and supports the suggestion that Geositta and Sclerurus form the sister clade to both core-ovenbirds and woodcreepers. Within the core-ovenbirds several relationships that are incongruent with traditional classifications are suggested. Among other things, the philydorine ovenbirds are found to be non-monophyletic. The mapping of principal nesting strategies onto the molecular phylogeny suggests cavity nesting to be plesiomorphic within the ovenbird–woodcreeper radiation. It is also suggested that the shift from cavity nesting to building vegetative nests is likely to have happened at least three times during the evolution of the group. We suggest that the shifts in nest architecture within the furnariine and synallaxine ovenbirds have served as an ecological release that has facilitated diversification into new habitats and new morphological specializations.

  • 219.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogenetic relationships of woodcreepers (Aves: Dendrocolaptinae) – incongruence between molecular and morphological data2004In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 280-288-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The woodcreepers is a highly specialized lineage within the New World suboscine radiation. Most systematic studies of higher level relationships of this group rely on morphological characters, and few studies utilizing molecular data exist. In this paper, we present a molecular phylogeny of the major lineages of woodcreepers (Aves: Dendrocolaptinae), based on nucleotide sequence data from a nuclear non-coding gene region (myoglobin intron II) and a protein-coding mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b). A good topological agreement between the individual gene trees suggests that the resulting phylogeny reflects the true evolutionary history of woodcreepers well. However, the DNA-based phylogeny conflicts with the results of a parsimony analysis of morphological characters. The topological differences mainly concern the basal branches of the trees. The morphological data places the genus Drymornis in a basal position (mainly supported by characters in the hindlimb), while our data suggests it to be derived among woodcreepers. Unlike most other woodcreepers, Drymornis is ground-adapted, as are the ovenbirds. The observed morphological similarities between Drymornis and the ovenbird outgroup may thus be explained with convergence or with reversal to an ancestral state. This observation raises the question of the use of characters associated with locomotion and feeding in phylogenetic reconstruction based on parsimony.

  • 220.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Systematic relationships and biogeography of the tracheophone suboscines (Aves: Passeriformes).2002In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 499-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on their highly specialized "tracheophone" syrinx, the avian families Furnariidae (ovenbirds), Dendrocolaptidae (woodcreepers), Formicariidae (ground antbirds), Thamnophilidae (typical antbirds), Rhinocryptidae (tapaculos), and Conopophagidae (gnateaters) have long been recognized to constitute a monophyletic group of suboscine passerines. However, the monophyly of these families have been contested and their interrelationships are poorly understood, and this constrains the possibilities for interpreting adaptive tendencies in this very diverse group. In this study we present a higher-level phylogeny and classification for the tracheophone birds based on phylogenetic analyses of sequence data obtained from 32 ingroup taxa. Both mitochondrial (cytochrome b) and nuclear genes (c-myc, RAG-1, and myoglobin) have been sequenced, and more than 3000 bp were subjected to parsimony and maximum-likelihood analyses. The phylogenetic signals in the mitochondrial and nuclear genes were compared and found to be very similar. The results from the analysis of the combined dataset (all genes, but with transitions at third codon positions in the cytochrome b excluded) partly corroborate previous phylogenetic hypotheses, but several novel arrangements were also suggested. Especially interesting is the result that the genus Melanopareia represents a basal branch within the tracheophone group, positioned in the phylogenetic tree well away from the typical tapaculos with which it has been supposed to group. Other novel results include the observation that the ground antbirds are paraphyletic and that Sclerurus is the sister taxon to an ovenbird-woodcreeper clade. Patterns of generic richness within each clade suggest that the early differentiation of feeble-winged forest groups took place south of the Amazon Basin, while the more recent diversification was near the equator and (in tapaculos and ovenbirds) in the south of the continent.

  • 221.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Nylander, Johan A A
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogenetic relationships of typical antbirds (Thamnophilidae) and test of incongruence based on Bayes factors.2004In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 4, p. 23-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The typical antbirds (Thamnophilidae) form a monophyletic and diverse family of suboscine passerines that inhabit neotropical forests. However, the phylogenetic relationships within this assemblage are poorly understood. Herein, we present a hypothesis of the generic relationships of this group based on Bayesian inference analyses of two nuclear introns and the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. The level of phylogenetic congruence between the individual genes has been investigated utilizing Bayes factors. We also explore how changes in the substitution models affected the observed incongruence between partitions of our data set.

    RESULTS: The phylogenetic analysis supports both novel relationships, as well as traditional groupings. Among the more interesting novel relationship suggested is that the Terenura antwrens, the wing-banded antbird (Myrmornis torquata), the spot-winged antshrike (Pygiptila stellaris) and the russet antshrike (Thamnistes anabatinus) are sisters to all other typical antbirds. The remaining genera fall into two major clades. The first includes antshrikes, antvireos and the Herpsilochmus antwrens, while the second clade consists of most antwren genera, the Myrmeciza antbirds, the "professional" ant-following antbirds, and allied species. Our results also support previously suggested polyphyly of Myrmotherula antwrens and Myrmeciza antbirds. The tests of phylogenetic incongruence, using Bayes factors, clearly suggests that allowing the gene partitions to have separate topology parameters clearly increased the model likelihood. However, changing a component of the nucleotide substitution model had much higher impact on the model likelihood.

    CONCLUSIONS: The phylogenetic results are in broad agreement with traditional classification of the typical antbirds, but some relationships are unexpected based on external morphology. In these cases their true affinities may have been obscured by convergent evolution and morphological adaptations to new habitats or food sources, and genera like Myrmeciza antbirds and the Myrmotherula antwrens obviously need taxonomic revisions. Although, Bayes factors seem promising for evaluating the relative contribution of components to an evolutionary model, the results suggests that even if strong evidence for a model allowing separate topology parameters is found, this might not mean strong evidence for separate gene phylogenies, as long as vital components of the substitution model are still missing.

  • 222.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fuchs, Jérôme
    Jønsson, Knud A
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Pasquet, Eric
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    The systematic affinity of the enigmatic Lamprolia victoriae (Aves: Passeriformes) - an example of avian dispersal between New Guinea and Fiji over Miocene intermittent land bridges?2008In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 1218-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 223.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Gelang, Magnus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sangster, George
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Olsson, Urban
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Alstrom, Per
    Neumann's Warbler Hemitesia neumanni (Sylvioidea): the sole African member of a Palaeotropic Miocene avifauna2011In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 153, no 1, p. 78-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Parsons, Thomas J.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogeny of major lineages of suboscines (Passeriformes) analysed by nuclear DNA sequence data2001In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 15-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships among major groups of passeriform birds were studied by analyses of nucleotide sequence data from two nuclear genes, c-myc and RAG-1. The results corroborated both the monophyly of the order Passeriformes, and the major dichotomy into oscine and suboscine passerines previously suggested based on syringeal morphology and DNA-DNA hybridizations. The representatives of the Old World suboscines (families Eurylaimidae, Philepittidae and Pittidae) formed a monophyletic clade. The New World suboscines clustered into two clades. The first contained Conopophaga (Conopophagidae), Furnarius (Furnariidae), Lepidocolaptes (Dendrocolaptidae), Thamnophilus (Formicariidae), and Rhinocrypta (Rhinocryptidae). Previously, the monophyly of this group has been inferred from their possession of a unique, "tracheophone" syrinx, and from DNA-DNA hybridisation data. The second clade of New World suboscines includes Gubernetes and Muscivora (Tyrannidae), Phytotoma (Phytotomidae), Tityra (Cotingidae) and Pipra (Pipridae). This group of families have been considered monophyletic based on morphology (although ambiguously) and DNA-DNA hybridisation. The sister group relationship of Tityra and Phytotoma supports the previously supposed cotingid affinity of Phytotoma. Nuclear DNA data also unambiguously group the lyrebirds Menura with the oscines. The presented results from the analysis of nuclear DNA agree well with morphology and DNA-DNA hybridisation data. The precise age of the divergences studied herein are unknown but based on interpretations of the fossil record of passerine birds many of them might date back to the early Tertiary. The agreement between data from the nuclear DNA and other sources, along with the fact that neither of the studied genes showed sign of saturation, indicate the great potential of these two nuclear genes to resolve very old divergences in birds.

  • 225.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Jønsson, Knud A
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Christidis, Les
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    An unexpectedly long history of sexual selection in birds-of-paradise.2009In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 9, p. 235-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The birds-of-paradise (Paradisaeidae) form one of the most prominent avian examples of sexual selection and show a complex biogeographical distribution. The family has accordingly been used as a case-study in several significant evolutionary and biogeographical syntheses. As a robust phylogeny of the birds-of-paradise has been lacking, these hypotheses have been tentative and difficult to assess. Here we present a well supported species phylogeny with divergence time estimates of the birds-of-paradise. We use this to assess if the rates of the evolution of sexually selected traits and speciation have been excessively high within the birds-of-paradise, as well as to re-interpret biogeographical patterns in the group.

    RESULTS: The phylogenetic results confirm some traditionally recognized relationships but also suggest novel ones. Furthermore, we find that species pairs are geographically more closely linked than previously assumed. The divergence time estimates suggest that speciation within the birds-of-paradise mainly took place during the Miocene and the Pliocene, and that several polygynous and morphologically homogeneous genera are several million years old. Diversification rates further suggest that the speciation rate within birds-of-paradise is comparable to that of the enitre core Corvoidea.

    CONCLUSION: The estimated ages of morphologically homogeneous and polygynous genera within the birds-of-paradise suggest that there is no need to postulate a particularly rapid evolution of sexually selected morphological traits. The calculated divergence rates further suggest that the speciation rate in birds-of-paradise has not been excessively high. Thus the idea that sexual selection could generate high speciation rates and rapid changes in sexual ornamentations is not supported by our birds-of-paradise data. Potentially, hybridization and long generation times in polygynous male birds-of-paradise have constrained morphological diversification and speciation, but external ecological factors on New Guinea may also have allowed the birds-of-paradise to develop and maintain magnificent male plumages. We further propose that the restricted but geographically complex distributions of birds-of-paradise species may be a consequence of the promiscuous breeding system.

  • 226.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Kallersjo, Mari
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Nuclear DNA from old collections of avian study skins reveals the evolutionary history of the Old World suboscines (Aves, Passeriformes)2006In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 567-580Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 227.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Peckmann, J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Tehler, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Broman, C
    Bach, W
    Behrens, K
    Reitner, J
    Bottcher, M.E
    Norback Ivarsson, L
    Zygomycetes in Vesicular Basanites from Vesteris Seamount, Greenland Basin - A New Type of Cryptoendolithic Fungi2015In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, article id e0133368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fungi have been recognized as a frequent colonizer of subseafloor basalt but a substantial understanding of their abundance, diversity and ecological role in this environment is still lacking. Here we report fossilized cryptoendolithic fungal communities represented by mainly Zygomycetes and minor Ascomycetes in vesicles of dredged volcanic rocks (basa- nites) from the Vesteris Seamount in the Greenland Basin. Zygomycetes had not been reported from subseafloor basalt previously. Different stages in zygospore formation are documented in the studied samples, representing a reproduction cycle. Spore structures of both Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes are mineralized by romanechite-like Mn oxide phases, indicating an involvement in Mn(II) oxidation to form Mn(III,VI) oxides. Zygospores still exhibit a core of carbonaceous matter due to their resistance to degradation. The fungi are closely associated with fossiliferous marine sediments that have been introduced into the vesicles. At the contact to sediment infillings, fungi produced haustoria that penetrated and scavenged on the remains of fragmented marine organisms. It is most likely that such marine debris is the main carbon source for fungi in shallow volcanic rocks, which favored the establishment of vital colonies. 

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  • 228. Ivković, Marija
    et al.
    Sinclair, Bradley J.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The century old taxonomic confusion surrounding Wiedemannia zetterstedti Fallén and related species is resolved (Diptera: Empididae): Revision of the W. zetterstedti group2022In: Insects, E-ISSN 2075-4450, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 460-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Wiedemannia zetterstedti species group is revised after examination of all available type specimens and includes one new species (W. ulrichi Ivković & Sinclair sp. nov.) and four redescribed species (W. czernyi (Bezzi), W. longipennis (Mik) stat. rev., W. rufipes (Oldenberg) stat. rev. and W. zetterstedti (Fallén)). The following new synonyms are proposed: W. (Roederella) ouedorum Vaillant, 1952 = W. czernyi (Bezzi, 1905); Paramesia riparia Robert, 1836 = W. zetterstedti (Fallén, 1826). Lectotypes are designated for the following species/subspecies: Atalanta hirtiloba Speiser, Brachystoma escheri Zetterstedt, Clinocera czernyi Bezzi, Clinocera longipennis Mik, Paramesia riparia Robert, and Roederia czernyi rufipes Oldenberg. In addition to morphological evidence, molecular species concepts were investigated using a molecular phylogenetic divergence-based species delimitation (bPTP) and results confirmed the morphological conclusions. A key to species is presented and geographic distributions are mapped.

  • 229.
    Ivković, Marija
    et al.
    University of Zagreb.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Previšić, Ana
    University of Zagreb.
    Molecular phylogenetics and biogeography provide insights into the subgeneric classification of Wiedemannia Zetterstedt (Diptera: Empididae: Clinocerinae)2019In: Systematic Entomology, ISSN 0307-6970, E-ISSN 1365-3113, Vol. 44, p. 559-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The subgenera of Wiedemannia are poorly defined and, as such, most recently described species are not assigned to a subgenus or have been assigned to a subgenus without explanation. In this study we perform a molecular phylogenetic analysis to elucidate relationships within the genus Wiedemannia. We sequenced two mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase c subunit I and cytochrome β) and two nuclear (carbomoylphosphate synthase domain of rudimentary and elongation factor‐1α) gene fragments to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships among the subgenera ChamaedipsiaEucelidiaPhilolutraPseudowiedemanniaRoederella and Wiedemannia (s.s.) using both Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood approaches. The genus was found to be monophyletic, but most of the subgenera were not. We propose eliminating the present subgeneric division altogether. Molecular dating using a log‐normal clock model and calibration with fossil species indicated that Wiedemannia diversified about 48 Ma, while there was still land connectivity between Europe and Asia with North America. Wiedemannia has a near‐worldwide distribution apart from the Australasian and Neotropical regions and Antarctica, with greatest species richness in the western Palaearctic, especially the Mediterranean region. Molecular phylogenetics support more recent morphological studies. The subgenera of Wiedemannia are invalid and rejected. Biogeographical data suggest potential hotspots, and the current distribution is discussed.

  • 230. Jacobson, Conny
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Campylium longicuspis (Lindb. & Arnell) Hedenäs (Bryophyta, Amblystegiaceae), another Arctic moss in the northern Scandinavian mountain range2015In: Lindbergia, ISSN 0105-0761, E-ISSN 2001-5909, Vol. 38, p. 17-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 231.
    Jagt, John
    et al.
    Natuurhistorisch Museum Maastricht.
    Thuy, Ben
    Geoscience Centre, University of Göttingen.
    Donovan, Stephen K.
    Naturalis Biodiversity Centre, Leiden.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Portell, Roger W.
    Pickerill, Ron K.
    Harper, David A. T.
    Lindsay, William
    Jackson, Trevor A.
    A starfish bed in the Middle Miocene Grand Bay Formation of Carriacou, The Grenadines (West Indies)2014In: Geological Magazine, ISSN 0016-7568, E-ISSN 1469-5081, Vol. 151, no 3, p. 381-393Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 232. James, Helen F
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Slikas, Beth
    Lei, Fumin
    Gill, Frank B
    Olson, Storrs L
    Pseudopodoces humilis, a misclassified terrestrial tit (Paridae) of the Tibetan Plateau: evolutionary consequences of shifting adaptive zones2003In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 145, no 2, p. 185-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pseudopodoces humilis (Hume's Ground-Jay) is a small passerine bird that inhabits the high rocky steppes of the Tibetan (Qinghai–Xizang) Plateau. Although it was long classified as a small species of ground jay (Podoces), two previous anatomical studies cast doubt on its assignment to the Corvidae (crows and jays). We studied the evolutionary relationships of Pseudopodoces using three independent datasets drawn from comparative osteology, the nuclear c-myc gene, and the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. All three datasets agree on the placement of Pseudopodoces in the family Paridae (tits and chickadees). The cytochrome b data further suggest that Pseudopodoces may be closest to the Great Tit Parus major species group. Pseudopodoces is the only species of parid whose distribution is limited to treeless terrain. Its evolutionary relationships were long obscured by adaptations to open habitat, including pale, cryptic plumage; a long, decurved bill for probing in crevices among rocks or in the ground; and long legs for terrestrial locomotion. Despite these accommodations to a novel adaptive zone, its evolutionary affinity with the Paridae is clearly expressed in comparative osteology and genetics, and is supported by its habit of nesting in cavities.

  • 233. Jenks, S.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Taxonomy and systematics of living hyaenas (family Hyaenidae)1998In: Hyaenas: status survey and conservation action plan / [ed] Mills, M. G. L. & Hofer, H., Gland: IUCN , 1998, p. 8-17Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Jensen, Peter Bonde
    et al.
    Department of Biology , Aarhus University , Ny Munkegade 114-116 , DK-8000 Aarhus C , Denmark.
    Dale-Skey Papilloud, Natalie
    Department of Life Sciences, the Natural History Museum (London, United Kingdom).
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    On the identity of three little-known Microterys Thomson species (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae)2022In: Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, ISSN 0013-8908, Vol. 158, no 4, p. 233-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Illustrated redescriptions are given for three species of encyrtid wasps first described in the early 1800s: Microterys cedrenus (Walker), M. cyanocephalus (Dalman) and M. interpunctus (Dalman), and four new synonyms are proposed: M. aldreyi Japoshvili (of M. cedrenus), M. dichrous (Mercet) (of M. cedrenus), M. steinbergi Sugonjaev (of M. cyanocephalus), and M. duplicatus (Nees) (of M. interpunctus).

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  • 235.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Alström, Per
    Olsson, Urban
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Sundberg, Per
    Price, Trevor D
    Build-up of the Himalayan avifauna through immigration: a biogeographical analysis of the Phylloscopus and Seicercus warblers.2007In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 324-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Himalayan mountain range is one of the most species-rich areas in the world, harboring about 8% of the world's bird species. In this study, we compare the relative importance of immigration versus in situ speciation to the build-up of the Himalayan avifauna, by evaluating the biogeographic history of the Phylloscopus/Seicercus warblers, a speciose clade that is well represented in Himalayan forests. We use a comprehensive, multigene phylogeny in conjunction with dispersal-vicariance analysis to discern patterns of speciation and dispersal within this clade. The results indicate that virtually no speciation has occurred within the Himalayas. Instead, several speciation events are attributed to dispersal into the Himalayas followed by vicariance between the Himalayas and China/Southeast Asia. Most, perhaps all, of these events appear to be pre-Pleistocene. The apparent lack of speciation within the Himalayas stands in contrast to the mountain-driven Pleistocene speciation suggested for the Andes and the East African mountains.

  • 236.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bowie, Rauri C.K.
    Hackett, Shannon J.
    Schulenberg, Thomas S.
    The Phylogenetic affinities of Crossley's Babbler (Mystacornis crossleyi): adding a new niche to the vanga radiation of Madagascar.2008In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 677-680Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 237.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ekman, Jan
    Bowie, Rauri C.K.
    Halvarsson, Peter
    Ohlson, Jan I.
    Price, Trevor D.
    Ericson, Per G.P.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    A complete multilocus species phylogeny of the tits and chickadees (Aves: Paridae)2013In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 69, p. 852-860Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 238.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    A re-evaluation of basal phylogenetic relationships within trogons (Aves: Trogonidae) based on nuclear DNA sequences2005In: Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, ISSN 0947-5745, E-ISSN 1439-0469, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 166-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The avian clade Trogonidae (trogons) consists of approximately 40 species distributed pantropically in the Neotropical, Afrotropical and Indomalayan zoogeographical regions. In this study, we evaluate the basal phylogenetic relationships within the trogons based on DNA sequences from three nuclear introns [myoglobin intron 2, β-fibrinogen intron 7 and glyceraldehydes-3-phosphodehydrogenase (G3PDH) intron 11]. In addition, previously published cytochrome b and 12S sequences were re-analysed and combined with the nuclear data set. The analysis of the three nuclear genes combined suggests a sister group relationship between the Afrotropical (Apaloderma) and Indomalayan (Harpactes) clades, whereas the Neotropical taxa (Trogon, Pharomachrus, and Priotelus) form an unresolved polytomy basal to these two groups. In addition, two of the three individual gene trees also support a sister group relationship between the Afrotropical and Indomalayan trogons. This is at odds with previously published studies based on mitochondrial sequence data and DNA–DNA hybridization. The third nuclear intron (G3PDH), however, suggests that the Afrotropical trogons are basal relative the other trogons. This was also suggested by the mitochondrial data set, as well as the analysis of the combined nuclear and mitochondrial data. Both of these conflicting hypotheses are supported by high posterior probabilities. An insertion in β-fibrinogen further supports a basal position of the Afrotropical clade. Analyses of the myoglobin intron with additional outgroups place the root differently and strongly support monophyly of each of the zoogeographical regions (including the Neotropics), and these three clades form a basal trichotomy. This suggests that that rooting is a serious problem in resolving basal phylogenetic relationships among the trogons.

  • 239.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Molecular support for a sister group relationship between Pici and Galbulae (Piciformes sensu Wetmore 1960)2003In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 185-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Woodpeckers, honeyguides, barbets, and toucans form a well-supported clade with approximately 355 species. This clade, commonly referred to as Pici, share with the South American clade Galbulae (puffbirds and jacamars) a zygodactyls foot with a unique arrangement of the deep flexor tendons (Gadow's Type VI). Based on these characters, Pici and Galbulae are often considered sister taxa, and have in traditional classification been placed in the order Piciformes. There are, however, a wealth of other morphological characters that contradicts this association, and indicates that Pici is closer related to the Passeriformes (passerines) than to Galbulae. Galbulae, in turn, is considered more closely related to the rollers and ground-rollers (Coracii). In this study, we evaluate these two hypotheses by using DNA sequence data from exons of the nuclear RAG-1 and c-myc genes, and an intron of the nuclear myoglobin gene, totally including 3400 basepairs of aligned sequences. The results indicate a sister group relationship between Pici and Galbulae, i.e. monophyly of the Piciformes, and this association has high statistical support in terms of bootstrap values and posterior probabilities. This study also supports several associations within the traditional order Coraciiformes, including a sister group relationship between the kingfishers (Alcedinidae) and a clade with todies (Todidae) and motmots (Momotidae), and with the bee-eaters (Meropidae) placed basal relative to these three groups.

  • 240.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G.P.
    Blom, Mozes
    Irestedt, Martin
    The phylogenetic position of the extinct Cuban Macaw Ara tricolor based on complete mitochondrial genome sequences2018In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 160, p. 666-672Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 241.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G.P.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Irestedt, Martin
    The phylogenetic position of the world´s smallest passerine, the Pygmy Bushtit Psaltria exilis2016In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 158, p. 519-529Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 242.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Bowie, Rauri C.K.
    Phylogenetic relationships witihn Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): A review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers.2008In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 858-876Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 243.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Lokugalappatti, L.G. Sampath
    Bowie, Rauri C.K.
    A nuclear DNA phylogeny and a proposed taxonomic revision of African greenbuls (Aves, Passeriformes, Pycnonotidae)2007In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 417-427Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 244.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Parsons, Thomas J.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Basal phylogeny of the Tyrannoidea based on comparisons of cytochrome b and exons of nuclear c-myc and RAG-1 genes2002In: The AUK: A Quarterly Journal of Ornithology, ISSN 0004-8038, E-ISSN 1938-4254, Vol. 119, no 4, p. 984-995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outlines of the phylogenetic relationships within the New World suboscine clade Tyrannoidea were investigated on the basis of nucleotide sequence data from two nuclear genes (c-myc and RAG-1) and one mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b), totaling over 2,400 bp. Representatives of the major tyrannoid lineages were sequenced, including Pachyramphus, Schiffornis, Tityra, and Oxyruncus. The data set with the three genes combined was analyzed under both the parsimony and maximum-likelihood criteria and under different character weighting schemes. The analyses resulted in similar topologies that differed only in poorly supported nodes. The three manakins (Pipra, Manacus, and Chiroxiphia) included in this study were found to be monophyletic, whereas Schiffornis—sometimes also considered to be a manakin—did not group with the manakins, but occurred with Pachyramphus and Tityra in the clade Tityrinae. The two clades Pipromorphinae and Tyranninae are also strongly supported in this analysis and appear as sister groups, thus supporting the monophyly of the tyrant flycatcher assemblage. Phytotoma was placed with the only cotingid species included in this analysis, whereas the position of Oxyruncus was unresolved.

  • 245.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Martin, Irestedt
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Ericson, Per G.P.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogenetic relationships of rollers (Coraciidae) based on complete mitochondrial genomesand fifteen nuclear genes2018In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 126, p. 17-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    Ohlson, Jan I.
    Tietze, Dieter Thomas
    Reconstruction of the Late Miocene Biogeographic History of Tits and Chickadees (Aves: Passeriformes: Paridae) – a Comparison between Discrete Area Analyses and ProbabilisticDiffusion Approach2018In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 45, p. 14-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 247.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Parsons, Thomas J.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Clades within the 'higher land birds', evaluated bg nuclear DNA sequences2001In: Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, ISSN 0947-5745, E-ISSN 1439-0469, Vol. 39, no 1-2, p. 37-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigated the phylogenetic relationships within the 'higher land birds' by parsimony analysis of nucleotide DNA sequences obtained from the two nuclear, protein-coding genes, c-myc and RAG-I. Nuclear genes have not previously been used to address this phylogenetic question. The results include high jackknife support for a monophyletic Apodiformes (including the Trochilidae). This arrangement was further supported by the observation of an insertion of four amino acids in the c-myc gene in all apodiform taxa. Monophyly was also inferred for each of the two piciform groups Galbulae and Pici. Within Pici, the Capitonidae was found to be paraphyletic, with the New World barbers more closely related to the Ramphastidae than to the Old World barbers. Another clade with high jackknife support consists of the Upupidae, Phoeniculidae and Bucerotidae. The families Momotidae and Todidae, and Coraciidae and Brachypteraciidae, respectively, also form well supported monophyletic clades. The results are inconclusive regarding the monophyly of the orders Coraciiformes and Piciformes, respectively.

  • 248.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Pasquet, Eric
    Irestedt, Martin
    The New Zealand: Thrush: An extinct Oriole2011In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 9, article id e24317Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 249. Johnsen, Arild
    et al.
    Rindal, Eirik
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Kerr, Kevin C. R.
    Stoeckle, Mark Y.
    Lifjeld, Jan T.
    DNA barcoding of Scandinavian birds reveals divergent lineages in trans-Atlantic species2010In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 151, no 3, p. 565-578Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 250. Johnson, Shannon
    et al.
    Warén, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Tunnicliffe, Verena
    Van Dover, Cindy
    Wheat, C. Geoffrey
    Schultz, Thomas F.
    Vrijenhoek, Robert C.
    Molecular taxonomy and naming of five cryptic species of Alviniconcha snails (Gastropoda: Abyssochrysoidea) from hydrothermal vents2015In: Systematics and Biodiversity, ISSN 1477-2000, E-ISSN 1478-0933, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 278-295Article in journal (Refereed)
2345678 201 - 250 of 559
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