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  • 251. Jonsson, Knud A.
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Fjeldsa, Jon
    A molecular phylogeny of minivets (Passeriformes: Campephagidae: Pericrocotus): implications for biogeography and convergent plumage evolution2010In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 252.
    Julia, Ferm
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Sylvain, Razafimandimbison
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Paracarphalea, a new genus of the coffee family segregated from the Malagasy endemic genus Carphalea (Rubiaceae, Rubioideae, Knoxieae)2016In: Phytotaxa, Vol. 263, no 2, p. 98-112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 253. Jönsson, Knud A.
    et al.
    Blom, Mozes P.K.
    Päckert, Martin
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Relicts of the lost arc: High-throughput sequencing of the Eutrichomyias rowleyi (Aves: Passeriformes) holotype uncovers an ancient biogeographic link between the Philippines and Fiji2018In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 120, p. 28-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 254. Jønsson, Knud A
    et al.
    Fabre, Pierre-Henri
    Fritz, Susanne A
    Etienne, Rampal S
    Ricklefs, Robert E
    Jørgensen, Tobias B
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Rahbek, Carsten
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Woog, Friederike
    Pasquet, Eric
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ecological and evolutionary determinants for the adaptive radiation of the Madagascan vangas.2012In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 109, no 17, p. 6620-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptive radiation is the rapid diversification of a single lineage into many species that inhabit a variety of environments or use a variety of resources and differ in traits required to exploit these. Why some lineages undergo adaptive radiation is not well-understood, but filling unoccupied ecological space appears to be a common feature. We construct a complete, dated, species-level phylogeny of the endemic Vangidae of Madagascar. This passerine bird radiation represents a classic, but poorly known, avian adaptive radiation. Our results reveal an initial rapid increase in evolutionary lineages and diversification in morphospace after colonizing Madagascar in the late Oligocene some 25 Mya. A subsequent key innovation involving unique bill morphology was associated with a second increase in diversification rates about 10 Mya. The volume of morphospace occupied by contemporary Madagascan vangas is in many aspects as large (shape variation)--or even larger (size variation)--as that of other better-known avian adaptive radiations, including the much younger Galapagos Darwin's finches and Hawaiian honeycreepers. Morphological space bears a close relationship to diet, substrate use, and foraging movements, and thus our results demonstrate the great extent of the evolutionary diversification of the Madagascan vangas.

  • 255. Jønsson, Knud A
    et al.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Systematic placement of an enigmatic Southeast Asian taxon Eupetes macrocerus and implications for the biogeography of a main songbird radiation, the Passerida.2007In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 323-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biogeographic connections between Australia and other continents are still poorly understood although the plate tectonics of the Indo-Pacific region is now well described. Eupetes macrocerus is an enigmatic taxon distributed in a small area on the Malay Peninsula and on Sumatra and Borneo. It has generally been associated with Ptilorrhoa in New Guinea on the other side of Wallace's Line, but a relationship with the West African Picathartes has also been suggested. Using three nuclear markers, we demonstrate that Eupetes is the sister taxon of the South African genus Chaetops, and their sister taxon in turn being Picathartes, with a divergence in the Eocene. Thus, this clade is distributed in remote corners of Africa and Asia, which makes the biogeographic history of these birds very intriguing. The most parsimonious explanation would be that they represent a relictual basal group in the Passerida clade established after a long-distance dispersal from the Australo-Papuan region to Africa. Many earlier taxonomic arrangements may have been based on assumptions about relationships with similar-looking forms in the same, or adjacent, biogeographic regions, and revisions with molecular data may uncover such cases of neglect of ancient relictual patterns reflecting past connections between the continents.

  • 256. Jønsson, Knud A
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fuchs, Jérôme
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Christidis, Les
    Bowie, Rauri C K
    Norman, Janette A
    Pasquet, Eric
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Explosive avian radiations and multi-directional dispersal across Wallacea: evidence from the Campephagidae and other Crown Corvida (Aves).2008In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 221-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The systematic relationships among avian families within Crown Corvida have been poorly studied so far and as such been of limited use for biogeographic interpretations. The group has its origin in Australia and is thought to have colonized Africa and the New World via Asia beginning some 35 Mya when terranes of Australian origin approached Asian landmasses. Recent detailed tectonic mapping of the origin of land masses in the region around Wallace's line have revealed a particularly complex movement of terranes over the last 20-30 Myr. Thus the biogeographic dispersal pattern of Crown Corvida is a particularly exciting case for linking vicariance and dispersal events with Earth history. Here we examine phylogenetic affinities among 72 taxa covering a broad range of genera in the basal radiations within Crown Corvida with an emphasis on Campephagidae and Pachycephalidae. Bayesian analyses of nuclear DNA sequence data identified the family Campephagidae as monophyletic but the large genus Coracina is not. Within the family Pachycephalidae the genera Pachycephala and Colluricincla are paraphyletic with respect to each other. The resulting phylogeny suggests that patterns of dispersal across Wallace's line are complex and began at least 25 Mya. We find evidence of explosive radiations and multi-directional dispersal within the last 10 Myr, and three independent long distance ocean dispersal events between Wallacea and Africa at 10-15 Mya. Furthermore, the study reveals that in the Campephagidae a complex series of dispersal events rather than vicariance is the most likely explanation for the current biogeographic pattern in the region.

  • 257. Jønsson, Knud Andreas
    et al.
    Delhey, Kaspar
    Sangster, George
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Correction to 'The evolution of mimicry of friarbirds by orioles (Aves: Passeriformes) in Australo-Pacific archipelagos'.2016In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 283, no 1837, article id 20161497Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 258. Jønsson, Knud Andreas
    et al.
    Delhey, Kaspar
    Sangster, George
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    The evolution of mimicry of friarbirds by orioles (Aves: Passeriformes) in Australo-Pacific archipelagos.2016In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 283, no 1833, article id 20160409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observations by Alfred Wallace and Jared Diamond of plumage similarities between co-occurring orioles (Oriolus) and friarbirds (Philemon) in the Malay archipelago led them to conclude that the former represent visual mimics of the latter. Here, we use molecular phylogenies and plumage reflectance measurements to test several key predictions of the mimicry hypothesis. We show that friarbirds originated before brown orioles, that the two groups did not co-speciate, although there is one plausible instance of co-speciation among species on the neighbouring Moluccan islands of Buru and Seram. Furthermore, we show that greater size disparity between model and mimic and a longer history of co-occurrence have resulted in a stronger plumage similarity (mimicry). This suggests that resemblance between orioles and friarbirds represents mimicry and that colonization of islands by brown orioles has been facilitated by their ability to mimic the aggressive friarbirds.

  • 259. Jørgensen, Per M.
    et al.
    Brinda, J.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    (2823) Proposal to reject the name Riccia sinuata (Marchantiophyta).2021In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 70, p. 897-Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 260. Jørgensen, Per M.
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    (2143) Proposal to conserve the name Fuscopannaria against Moelleropsis (lichenized Ascomycota)2013In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 629-639Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 261. Jørgensen, Per M.
    et al.
    Otálora, Monica A.G.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    (2235) Proposal to conserve the name Leptogium (lichenized Ascomycota) with a conserved type.2013In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 62, p. 1333-1334Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 262. Jørgensen, Per M.
    et al.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Further additions to “Pauperrimi rustici”: A Linnaean phrase, applying to mosses2019In: The Linnean, Vol. 35, p. 9-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 263.
    Kainulainen, Kent
    et al.
    1University of Michigan Herbarium and EEB Department, 3600 Varsity Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48108, USA.
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    New taxonomic combinations in West Indian Ocean Vanguerieae (Rubiaceae)2016In: Phytotaxa, ISSN ISSN 1179-3155, Vol. 282, no 4, p. 267-272Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 264. Kainulainen, Kent
    et al.
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    De Block, Petra
    The Coffeeae alliance (subfamily Ixoroideae)2022In: The new Natural History of Madagascar / [ed] S. Goodman, USA: Princeton University Press, 2022, p. 759-761Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 265. Kainulainen, Kent
    et al.
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Wikström, Niklas
    Bremer, Birgitta
    Island hopping, long-distance dispersal and species radiation: historical biogeography of the Coffeeae alliance (Rubiaceae)2017In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 44, p. 1966-1979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The Western Indian Ocean region (WIOR) is home to a very diverse and largely unique flora that has mainly originated via long-distance dispersals. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the origins of the WIOR biodiversity and to understand the dynamics of colonization events between the islands. We investigate spatial and temporal hypotheses of the routes of dispersal, and compare the dispersal patterns of plants of the Coffeeae alliance (Rubiaceae) and their dispersers. Rubiaceae is the second most species-rich plant family in Madagascar, and includes many endemic genera. The neighbouring archipelagos of the Comoros, Mascarenes and Seychelles also harbour several endemic Rubiaceae.

    Location. The islands of the Western Indian Ocean.

    Methods. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence times were reconstructed from plastid DNA data of an ingroup sample of 340 species, using Bayesian inference. Ancestral areas and range evolution history were inferred by a maximum likelihood method that takes topological uncertainty into account.

    Results. At least 15 arrivals to Madagascar were inferred, the majority of which have taken place within the last 10 Myr. Most dispersal events were supported as being from mainland Africa, but Catunaregam may have dispersed from Asia. Although most Coffeeae alliance lineages are zoochorous, the general pattern of dispersals from Africa is incongruent with the biogeographic origins of the extant Malagasy volant frugivores. Several out-of-Madagascar dispersals were inferred to the neighbouring islands, as well as back-colonizations of Africa.

    Main conclusions. The African flora has been of foremost importance as source of dispersal to the islands of the Western Indian Ocean. Following the colonization of Madagascar, rapid radiations appear to have taken place in some clades, and Madagascar has also been an important source area for subsequent dispersal to the Comoros, Mascarenes and Seychelles.

  • 266. Kantvilas, Gintaras
    et al.
    Gueidan, Cécile
    Tehler, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany. anders.tehler@nrm.se.
    The strange case of Ocellomma rediuntum (Arthoniales: Roccellaceae) in Australia: a remarkably disjunct lichen2020In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 52, p. 187-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new combination Ocellomma rediuntum (Stizenb. ex Hasse) Kantvilas, Gueidan & Tehler is proposed, supported by morphological, anatomical and molecular data. Hitherto known only from the Californian coast, this species is here recorded for Kangaroo Island (South Australia), Victoria and Tasmania. It is described and illustrated from Australian collections. The ecology of the species and its remarkable distribution are discussed.

  • 267. Kantvilas, Gintaras
    et al.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lichenicolous species of the ascomycete genus Arthonia Ach. from Kangaroo Island2015In: Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, ISSN 2201-9855, Vol. 29, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 268. Kantvilas, Gintaras
    et al.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Svensson, Måns
    Australidea (Malmideaceae, Lecanorales), a new genus of lecideoid lichens, with notes on the genus Malcolmiella2021In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 395-407Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 269. Khodami, Sahar
    et al.
    Martinez Arbizu, Pedro
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Laakman, Silke
    Molecular species delimitation of Icelandic brittle stars (Ophiuroidea)2014In: Polish Polar Research, ISSN 0138-0338, E-ISSN 2081-8262, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 243-260Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 270.
    Kirk, Paul
    et al.
    Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK.
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    A without-prejudice list of generic names of fungi for protection under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants.2013In: IMA Fungus, ISSN 2210-6340, E-ISSN 2210-6359, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 381-443Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 271. Knudsen, K
    et al.
    Kocourková, J
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Wheeler, T
    Two new species of Acarosporaceae from North America with carbonized epihymenial accretions.2016In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 48, p. 347-354Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 272.
    Kosonen, Timo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Huhtinen, Seppo
    Ordning i Hyaloscyphaceae2015In: Svensk Mykologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 1653-0357, Vol. 36, p. 9-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 273.
    Kosonen, Timo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany. Herbarium, Biodiversity Unit, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland.
    Huhtinen, Seppo
    Herbarium, Biodiversity Unit, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland..
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Taxonomy and systematics of Hyaloscyphaceae and Arachnopezizaceae2020In: Persoonia, ISSN 0031-5850, E-ISSN 1878-9080, p. 26-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 274. Kosuthova, Alica
    et al.
    Fernández-Brime, Samantha
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Collolechia revisited and a re-assessment of ascus characteristics in Placynthiaceae (Peltigerales, Ascomycota)2016In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 48, p. 3-13Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 275.
    Kosuthova, Alica
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Otálora, Monica A.G.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Rostania revisited – testing generic delimitations in Collemataceae (Peltigerales, Lecanoromycetes)2019In: MycoKeys, ISSN 1314-4057, E-ISSN 1314-4049, Vol. 47, p. 17-33Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 276.
    Kosuthova, Alica
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    A revision of the Rostania occultata (Collemataceae) complex in Fennoscandia2022In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 13-24Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 277. Kozhevnikov, A. E.
    et al.
    Kozhevnikova, Z. V.
    Anderberg, Arne Alfred
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Klackenberg, Jens
    Azuma, T.
    Takahashi, H.
    Northern boundary of Myosoton aquaticum Moench (Caryophyllaceae) geographical distribution in East Asia.2018In: Komarovskye chtenia, Vol. 65, p. 83-87Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 278.
    Košuthová, Alica
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Westberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Species delimitation in the cyanolichen genus Rostania2020In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In this study, we investigate species limits in the cyanobacterial lichen genus Rostania (Collemataceae, Peltigerales, Lecanoromycetes). Four molecular markers (mtSSU rDNA, β-tubulin, MCM7, RPB2) were sequenced and analysed with two coalescent-based species delimitation methods: the Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC) and a Bayesian species delimitation method (BPP) using a multispecies coalescence model (MSC), the latter with or without an a priori defined guide tree.

    Results

    Species delimitation analyses indicate the presence of eight strongly supported candidate species. Conclusive correlation between morphological/ecological characters and genetic delimitation could be found for six of these. Of the two additional candidate species, one is represented by a single sterile specimen and the other currently lacks morphological or ecological supporting evidence.

    Conclusions

    We conclude that Rostania includes a minimum of six species: R. ceraniscaR. multipunctataR. occultata 1, R. occultata 2, R. occultata 3, and R. occultata 4,5,6. Three distinct Nostoc morphotypes occur in Rostania, and there is substantial correlation between these morphotypes and Rostania thallus morphology.

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  • 279.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A new species in the Pardosa lugubris group from Central Europe (Arachnida, Araneae, Lycosidae)1999In: Spixiana, ISSN 0341-8391, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 280.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Marusik, Yuri M.
    Omelko, Mikhail M
    Studies on species of Holarctic Pardosa groups (Araneae, Lycosidae). VIII. The Palearctic species of the Pardosa nigra group2014In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3894, no 1, p. 33-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 281. Kubilus, Rimas A.
    et al.
    Bölz, Adrian
    Feldberg, Kathrin
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Schäfer-Verwimp, Alfons
    Schmidt, Alexander R.
    Heinrichs, Jochen
    The moss Helicophyllum torquatum (Bryopsida:Helicophyllaceae) has survived since at least the Miocene2017In: Botanical journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4074, E-ISSN 1095-8339, Vol. 185, no 1, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 282.
    Kudlicka, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Murray, Lawrence
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Schön, Thomas B.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Probabilistic programming for birth-death models of evolution using an alive particle filter with delayed sampling2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 283. Kuhn, Kerstin
    et al.
    Schwenk, Klaus
    Both, Christiaan
    Canal, David
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    van der Mije, Steven
    Töpfer, Till
    Päckert, Martin
    Differentiation in neutral genes and a candidate gene in the pied flycatcher: using biological archives to track globalclimate change2013In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 3, no 14, p. 4799-4799Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 284.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Devario fangae and Devario myitkyinae, two new species of danionin cyprinids from northern Myanmar (Teleostei: Cyprinidae: Danioninae): 2017In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4227, no 3, p. 407-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Devario comprises 38 potentially valid species in southern Asia. Ten species of Devario have been reported so far from Myanmar, six of which belong in the group of striped devarios, with predominantly horizontal stripes in the colour pattern.Among them, records of D. aequipinnatus most likely represent misidentifications. Remaining species of striped devariosin Myanmar are known only from brief descriptions and are in need of taxonomic revision. Devario yuensis and D. deruptotalea,known previously only from India, are here reported for the first time from Myanmar. Devario fangae, new species,is described on the basis of specimens collected in 1998 from small streams in Putao in the extreme north ofMyanmar. These streams drain to the Mali Hka River, a tributary of the Ayeyarwaddy River. Devario fangae sharesuniquely with D. browni and D. kakhienensis an anterior expansion in width of the middle dark stripe on the side (P stripe).It differs from D. browni and D. kakhienensis in presence of a broad P stripe, wider than adjacent interstripes, vs. narrow,as wide as or narrower than interstripes. Devario fangae is further similar to other species of Devario characterized bythree dark stripes (P, P+1, P-1) along the side, but differs from these in having all three stripes wide and of about equalwidth vs. P stripe wide and P+1 and P-1 stripes much narrower. The largest specimen of D. fangae is 61.0 mm SL. Females are significantly more deep-bodied than males. A specimen of D. aequipinnatus reported from Putao in 1919 probablyr epresents D. fangae.Devario myitkyinae, new species, is described on the basis of specimens collected in 1997 and 1998 from a streamand lake in the Ayeyarwaddy River drainage near Myitkyina in northern Myanmar. It is similar to D. browni and D.kakhienensis, but different from D. fangae in having horizontal stripes on side equal in width, narrow, irregular, and to some extent curved away from horizontal extension. Devario myitkyinae differs from D. browni, D. kakhienensis, and D.fangae in absence of anterior widening of the P stripe. Devario myitkyinae is similar to other species of Devario characterized by three dark stripes (P, P+1, P-1) along the side, but differs from these in having all three stripes irregularand of equal width vs. stripes regular, P stripe wide and P+1 and P-1 stripes much narrower. The largest wild specimen of D. myitkyinae is 68.7 mm SL. A specimen collected near Myitkyina and reported as D. aequipinnatus in 1929 probably represents D. myitkyinae.

  • 285.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    G.J. Billberg's (1833) 'On the Ichthyology, and description of some new fish species of the pipefish genus Syngnathus'2016In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3066, no 2, p. 101-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gustaf Johan Billberg’s review of ichthyology, published in Swedish in 1833 in the Linnéska samfundets handlingar, mentions92 fish taxa at genus and species level, 41 of which represent new taxa, unnecessary replacement names, or unjustifiedemendations. Billberg presents his own classification of fishes, in which five new family names are introduced:Ballistidae, Diodontidae, Ooididae, Chironectidae, and Macrorhyncidae. Diodontidae has priority over Diodontidae Bonaparte, 1835. Macrorhyncidae was published earlier than Gempylidae Gill, 1862, but the latter has priority by prevailingusage.Billberg mentions 61 genera of fishes, 41 of them listed only by name. Six generic names proposed by Billberg are available as unjustified emendations: Myxinus, Petromyzus, Scylia, Mustellus, Zyganna, and Ballistes. Brachionus is anunnecessary replacement name. Aphrus, Capriscus, Exormizus, Enneophthalmus, and Oedaus are nomina nuda. Eight new genera of fishes are proposed: Anodon, Posthias, Orbis, Sphaeroides, and Ooides are junior synonyms; Cotilla is anomen oblitum in relation to Sufflamen Jordan, 1916; Tropigaster a nomen oblitum in relation to Aracana Gray, 1835;and Tetragonizus a nomen oblitum in relation to Lactoria Jordan & Fowler, 1902.Billberg lists 31 species of fishes. Three represent new combinations; two are nomina nuda. The following 14 newspecies are described based on literature: Raja forskohlii, Cephaloptera dumerillii, Myliobatis lacepedei, Scylia russelii,Anodon macropterus, Cotilla frenata, Monacanthus blochii, M. sebae, M. cuvieri, M. marcgravii, Tetraodon striatus,Orbis psittacinus, Orbis punctulatus, and Orbis guttatus. All of those are invalid, except Scylia russelii, which is a species inquirenda. The following nine species group names are unnecessary replacement names and consequentlyinvalid: Raja arabica, Myliobatis rissoi, Scylia isabellina, Anodon cirrhosus, Anodon cornutus, Zyganna voracissima,Centrina broussonetii, Acipenser vulgaris, and Acipenser ichthyocolla.Three species of pipefishes of the family Syngnathidae are described and figured by Billberg from drawings ofspecimens observed on the Swedish West Coast. Syngnathus virens and S. pustulatus are junior synonyms of S. typhle Linnaeus, 1758. Syngnathus palmstruchii is a junior synonym of Entelurus aequoreus (Linnaeus, 1758).

  • 286.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nemachilichthys ruppelli (Teleostei: Nemacheilidae) and the proper correction of the German umlaut2016In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4111, no 1, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fish species names based on the family name of Eduard Rüppell are reviewed, and it is concluded that Nemachilichthys ruppelli correct name for Cobitis rupellii Sykes, 1839

  • 287.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Taxonomy of chain Danio, an Indo-Myanmar species assemblage, with descriptions of four new species (Teleostei: Cyprinidae)2015In: Ichthyological Exploration of Freshwaters, ISSN 0936-9902, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 357-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Danio dangila is widely distributed in the Ganga and lower Brahmaputra basins of India, Nepal and Bangladeshand distinguished by the cleithral spot in the shape of a short vertical stripe (vs. a round spot in all similar species).Four new species are described, similar to D. dangila but with round cleithral spot and each diagnosed byspecies specific colour pattern. Danio assamila, new species, is reported from the upper and middle Brahmaputradrainage in India. Danio catenatus, new species, and D. concatenatus, new species, occur in rivers of the western slope of the Rakhine Yoma, Myanmar. Danio sysphigmatus, new species, occurs in the Sittaung drainage and smal lcoastal drainages in southeastern Myanmar. Those five species, collectively referred to as chain danios, make upa distinctive group within Danio, diagnosed by elevated number of unbranched dorsal-fin rays, long rostral andmaxillary barbels, complete lateral line, presence of a prominent cleithral spot, horizontal stripes modified intoseries of rings formed by vertical bars between horizontal dark stripes, and pectoral and pelvic fins each with the unbranched first ray prolonged and reaching well beyond the rest of the fin. Danio meghalayensis is resurrected from the synonymy of D. dangila, with D. deyi as a probable junior synonym. Danio meghalayensis has a colour pattern similar to that of chain danios with vertical bars bridging parallel horizontal stripes but usually predominantly stripes instead of series of rings, a smaller cleithral spot and shorter barbels, and the unbranched ray in the pectoral and pelvic fins is not prolonged. Danio meghalayensis is known only from the Brahmaputra drainagein Meghalaya, India. The geographical distribution of the chain danios represents a unique pattern for the region, and may be explained by different climate and river drainage systems during the latest glacial period

  • 288.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The need for fish taxonomy in biodiversity and fishery assessment and management2014In: Fish identification tools for biodiversity and fisheries assessments: Review and guidance for decision-makers / [ed] Johanne Fischer, Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), 2014, p. 52-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 289.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Britz, Ralf
    The Natural History Museum.
    Description of Danio absconditus, new species, and redescription of Danio feegradei (Teleostei: Cyprinidae), from the Rakhine Yoma hotspot in south-western Myanmar2015In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3948, no 2, p. 233-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Danio feegradei Hora is redescribed based on recently collected specimens from small coastal streams on the western slope of the Rakhine Yoma, ranging from the Thade River drainage southward to slightly north of Kyeintali. Danio absconditus,new species, is described from the Kyeintali Chaung and small coastal streams near Gwa, south of the range of D. feegradei. Both species are distinguished from other Danio by the presence of a dark, elongate or round spot at the baseof the caudal fin and a cleithral marking composed of a small black spot margined by a much smaller orange spot. Danio feegradei is characterized by the colour pattern, with series of white spots along the otherwise dark side; D. absconditusby about 7–11 dark vertical bars on the abdominal side. Within Danio, the presence of a complete lateral line, cleithralspot, and 14 circumpeduncular scales is shared with D. dangila and similar species, but these character states may be plesiomorphicas suggested by the shared presence of cleithral spot and complete lateral line in Devario and Betadevario. In other Danio the cleithral spot is absent, the lateral line is short or absent, and the circumpeduncular scale count is lower(10–12). Twenty teleost species are reported from streams on the western slope of the Rakhine Yoma, all probably endemic.The parapatric distribution of D. absconditus and D. feegradei is unique within the genus, and may be partly explainedby changes in eustatic sea levels.

  • 290.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Chalinochromis cyanophleps, a new species of cichlid fish (Teleostei: Cichlidae) from Lake Tanganyika2014In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3790, no 3, p. 425-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chalinochromis cyanophleps is described from nine specimens, the largest 129 mm SL, from Namansi. It differs fromother species of Chalinochromis in plain trunk colouration, absence of black stripes on the head, relatively narrow lips, presence of tricuspid jaw teeth, and presence of five rather than four dentary lateralis foramina. The blue iridescent stripe below the eye is shared with other lamprologin cichlids, but is broader and more conspicuous in C. cyanophleps.

    Chalinochromis cyanophleps occurs at depths between 6 and 45 m in rocky habitats along the Tanzanian coast of Lake Tanganyika,from Mvuna Island south to Kalala Island, a stretch of about 90 km. Field observations were made of specimens up to 18 cm total length. The COI DNA barcode sequence differs by 1.8% from that of C. popelini.

  • 291.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Danio htamanthinus (Teleostei: Cyprinidae), a new species of miniature cyprinid fish from the Chindwin River in Myanmar2016In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4178, no 4, p. 535-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Danio htamanthinus, new species, is described from small streams in the vicinity of Htamanthi on the middle Chindwin River. It is most similar to D. choprae and D. flagrans from the Ayeyarwaddy River drainage, sharing the same elaborate colour pattern with dark vertical bars and a red interstripe along the posterior side, but is distinguished by the absence of a P+1 stripe and presence of a P stripe represented only by small spots. The uncorrected p-distance in the mitochondrial COI gene separates D. htamanthinus from D. choprae by 4.3% and from D. flagrans by 7.5%. The largest specimen is only 22.9 mm in standard length (male holotype), but the holotype and one other male, 19.5 mm SL, feature sex-specific pectoral-fin tubercles, and a female as small as 16.6 mm SL has ripening ova.In a phylogenetic analysis based on COI sequences, D. htamanthinus is sister taxon of D. flagrans+D. choprae, and those three species are sister group of D. margaritatus+D.erythromicron.

  • 292.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. FishBase.
    The real Devario browni from the Irrawaddy River basin, and the new Devario ahlanderi from the Salween River basin in Myanmar (Teleostei: Cyprinidae: Danioninae)2022In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, ISSN 1175-5326, Vol. 5100, no 1, p. 54-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Specimens of Devario from a tributary to the Salween River in Myanmar initially identified as Devario browni but witha different colour pattern, were subjected to a comparative morphological analysis with syntypes and other specimens of D. browni from near its putative type locality. The Salween sample was recognised as representing a distinct species, here named Devario ahlanderi. No significant morphometric differences were found between D. ahlanderi and D. browni.The type series of Devario ahlanderi differed from D. browni and most other species of Devario in the presence of 14 vs 12 circumpeduncular scale rows. Devario ahlanderi, D. browni, and D. fangae shared subadult colour pattern. Adult D. ahlanderi differed from adult D. browni in the trunk colour pattern, consisting of rows of dark blotches or short vertical bars. In D. browni, the flank colour pattern consisted of horizontal dark stripes, the middle of which (the P stripe) frequently diverged anteriorly, enclosing a small light blotch. Specimens previously reported as D. browni from the upper Salween River basin in Yunnan differed slightly in colour pattern, and may represent a distinct species. Devario ahlanderi shared spotted colour pattern with that of one ontogenetic state in D. kysonensis, except that a row of spots marking the P-1 stripe in D. kysonensis was absent in D. ahlanderi. The minimum genetic distance between D. ahlanderi and congeneric species varied from 2.1 to 5% in the mt-coI gene.

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  • 293.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Description of Neolamprologus timidus, new species, and review of N. furcifer from Lake Tanganyika (Teleostei: Cichlidae)2013In: Ichthyological Exploration of Freshwaters, ISSN 0936-9902, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 301-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neolamprologus timidus, new species, is described from Ulwile Island and adjacent localities on the Tanzanian coast of Lake Tanganyika. The species was observed or collected along about 100 km of coastline from KolwePoint, Cape Mpimbwe, south to Kisi Island. It is distinguished from the most similar species, N. furcifer, by presenceof scales on most of the cheek, long pectoral fin and pelvic fin with the second ray longer than the first. Neolamprologus timidus is sympatric with N. furcifer at Kolwe Point and south to Kampempa Point, and at Lupitaand Ulwile Islands south to Kisi Island, but N. furcifer is otherwise absent from the range of N. timidus. Two morphologically distinct forms are recognized in N. furcifer. Samples of N. furcifer from Ulwile Island and slightly more southern localities possess a caudal fin with rounded lobes and long middle rays, appearing onlyslightly emarginate. Samples of N. furcifer from Udachi and nearby localities possess pointed caudal-fin lobeswith greatly elongated streamers, similar to N. timidus and to N. furcifer from other parts of Lake Tanganyika, including the type specimens from the southern part of the lake. The variation in caudal-fin shape may be an expression of character displacement as it occurs in the area of sympatry between N. timidus and N. furcifer. MitochondrialDNA sequences are nearly identical in samples of N. furcifer with pointed or rounded caudal fin. A molecular phylogenetic analysis of a large set of lamprologin cichlids using two mitochondrial genes corroborates earlier analyses and places N. furcifer and N. timidus in different clades with different species of Neolamprologus, Julidochromis, Chalinochromis, and Telmatochromis despite sharing a unique combination of fin and bodyshape, and colour pattern. A 4648 base-pair multiloci analysis of a smaller number of species using fragments ofthree mitochondrial and two nuclear genes resolves N. furcifer and N. timidus in sister clades, but the N. timidus clade also includes Telmatochromis brachygnathus, and N. furcifer is sister species of Chalinochromis brichardi.

  • 294.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rahman, MD. Mizanur
    University of Dhaka.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Mollah, Abdur Rob
    University of Dhaka.
    Danio annulosus, a new species of chain Danio from the Shuvolong Falls in Bangladesh (Teleostei: Cyprinidae: Danioninae)2015In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3994, no 1, p. 53-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Danio annulosus, new species, is described from a small pool below the Shuvolong Falls in the Kaptai Lake system in Bangladesh. It shares with chain danios (D. assamila, D. dangila, D. catenatus, D. concatenatus, and D. sysphigmatus) a colour pattern consisting of series of dark rings with light interspaces along the side, complete lateral line, 14 cir-cumpeduncular scales, a produced first ray in the pectoral fin, and a black humeral spot. It differs from other chain danios in possessing much shorter pectoral and pelvic fins, and a humeral spot that is slightly wider than deep instead of round or deeper than wide. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequence separates D. annulosus from the most similar species, D. catenatus by a p-distance of 3.4%. Although recorded from only a single locality, Danio annulosus is expected to have a wider distribution in the Karnafuli River drainage

  • 295.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rahman, MD. Mizanur
    University of Dhaka.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Mollah, Abdur Rob
    University of Dhaka.
    Devario in Bangladesh: species diversity, sibling species, and introgression in danionin cyprinids (Teleostei: Cyprinidae: Danioninae2017In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, p. 1-37, article id 12(11): e0186895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four species of Devario are recorded from Bangladesh: D. aequipinnatus, D. anomalus, D. coxi, new species, and D. devario. Devario aequipinnatus has a wide distribution in northern India and Bangladesh. Devario coxi, from southeastern Bangladesh near Cox’s Bazar, differs from D. aequipinnatus in mtDNA (COI, p-distance 1.8%), colouration, proportional measurements, and meristics. The minor morphological differences and low frequency of overlapping meristics suggest relatively recent separation of D. coxi from other D. aequipinnatus. Devario anomalus occurs only in southeastern Bangladesh and is here reported from localities in addition to the type locality. It differs from the similar D. xyrops in adjacent Myanmar by slender body shape and by 2.3% p-distance in the COI gene. Specimens of D. anomalus from the Sangu River were found to have the mitochondrial genome of D. aequipinnatus from Bangladesh, but agree with other D. anomalus in the nuclear RAG1 gene. Devario devario has a wide distribution on the Indian Peninsula and border regions; in Bangladesh it is restricted in distribution to the Ganga, Brahmaputra, and Meghna drainages. Reports of D. assamensis and D. malabaricus from Bangladesh are misidentifications. Perilampus ostreographus M’Clelland, 1839, is tentatively synonymized with D. aequipinnatus. Phylogenetic analysis of 14 species of striped devarios based on the COI gene results in a polytomy with four unresolved clades. Devario deruptotalea from the Chindwin basin is the sister group of D. aequipinnatus+D. coxi. Devario devario is the sistergroup of D. xyrops+D. anomalus.

  • 296.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Varella, Henrique Rosa
    Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo.
    Wallace’s Pike Cichlid Gets a Name after 160 Years: A New Species of CichlidFish (Teleostei: Cichlidae) from the Upper Rio Negro in Brazil2015In: Copeia, ISSN 0045-8511, E-ISSN 1938-5110, Vol. 103, no 3, p. 512-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    cichlid species first collected by Alfred Russell Wallace in the upper Rio Negro in 1852, lost during the transport toEngland but documented in drawings, is described as Crenicichla monicae on the basis of three specimens collected by the Swedish Amazonas Expedition 1923–1925. Crenicichla monicae is most similar to C. johanna, C. rosemariae, and one undescribed species which are characterized by cycloid scales, distinguishing them from other species of the genus in which most scales are ctenoid. Crenicichla monicae is recorded only from the lower Rio Uaupés and lower Rio Ic¸ana,tributaries of the upper Rio Negro, and is sympatric with the similar species C. johanna and C. lenticulata. It isdistinguished from all other species of Crenicichla by the color pattern in females, with scattered dark spots on the upperhalf of the side and on the dorsal and caudal fins. Crenicichla monicae is a member of the C. lugubris species group,characterized by very small scales in a large number along the middle of the side (89–126 scales in E1 row), blunt snout,and particular ontogenetic transformation of color pattern

  • 297. Kučera, Jan
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Revisiting the genus Campyliadelphus (Amblystegiaceae, Bryophyta)2020In: Nova Hedwigia, Beihefte, ISSN 0078-2238, Vol. 150, p. 165-178Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 298.
    Kärnefelt, Ingvar
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Arup, Ulf
    Lund University.
    Arvidsson, Lars
    Bendiksby, Mika
    Båtvik, Jan Ingar
    Fuerer, Tassilo
    Galloway, David
    Haugan, Reidar
    Klepsland, Jon
    Kukwa, Martin
    Larsson, Ulf
    Launis, Annina
    Millanes, Ana
    Prieto, Maria
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Pykälä, Juha
    Seaward, Mark
    Thell, Arne
    Timdal, Einar
    Tsurykau, Andrei
    Wall, Staffan
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lichens from the Vadstena Monastery churchyard – the burial place of Erik Acharius2014In: Graphis Scripta, ISSN 0901-7593, Vol. 26, no 1-2, p. 34-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 299. Köckinger, Heribert
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    A farewell to Tortella bambergeri (Pottiaceae) as understood over the last decades2017In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 213-225Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 300. Köckinger, Heribert
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Solving nomenclatural problems surrounding Mollia thrausta Stirt., Barbula tortuosa var. fragilifolia Jur. and Tortella fasciculata (Culm.) Culm.2020In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 186-189Article in journal (Refereed)
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