Change search
Refine search result
45678910 301 - 350 of 559
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 301. Leavitt, S.D.
    et al.
    Westberg, M
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Complex pattern of intercontinental and isolated lineages in a common, cosmopolitan lichen-forming fungal component of biological soil crusts, Psora decipiens (Psoraceae, Ascomycota)2018In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 9:283Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 302.
    Leppänen, Sanna
    et al.
    Department of Biology, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Värri, Kaisa
    Department of Biology, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Nyman, Tommi
    Department of Ecosystems in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    A Comparative Analysis of Genetic Differentiation across Six Shared Willow Host Species in Leaf- and Bud-Galling Sawflies2014In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 12, p. 1-19, article id e116286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic divergence and speciation in plant-feeding insects could be driven by contrasting selection pressures imposed by different plant species and taxa. While numerous examples of host-associated differentiation (HAD) have been found, the overall importance of HAD in insect diversification remains unclear, as few studies have investigated its frequency in relation to all speciation events. One promising way to infer the prevalence and repeatability of HAD is to estimate genetic differentiation in multiple insect taxa that use the same set of hosts. To this end, we measured and compared variation in mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS2 sequences in population samples of leaf-galling Pontania and bud-galling Euura sawflies (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae) collected from six Salix species in two replicate locations in northern Fennoscandia. We found evidence of frequent HAD in both species complexes, as individuals from the same willow species tended to cluster together on both mitochondrial and nuclear phylogenetic trees. Although few fixed differences among the putative species were found, hierarchical AMOVAs showed that most of the genetic variation in the samples was explained by host species rather than by sampling location. Nevertheless, the levels of HAD measured across specific pairs of host species were not correlated in the two focal galler groups. Hence, our results support the hypothesis of HAD as a central force in herbivore speciation, but also indicate that evolutionary trajectories are only weakly repeatable even in temporally overlapping radiations of related insect taxa.

  • 303. Lipscomb, Diana L.
    et al.
    Farris, James S
    Källersjö, Mari
    Tehler, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Support, ribosomal sequences, and the phylogeny of the eukaryotes1998In: Cladistics, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 303-338Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 304. Liu, X.Z.
    et al.
    Wang, Q.M.
    Göker, M
    Groenewald, M
    Kachalkin, A.V.
    Lumbsch, H. Thorsten
    Millanes, A.M.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Boekhout, T
    Bai, F.Y.
    Towards an integrated phylogenetic classification of the Tremellomycetes2016In: Studies in mycology, ISSN 0166-0616, E-ISSN 1872-9797, Vol. 81, p. 85-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 305. Liu, Yang
    et al.
    Johnson, Matthew G.
    Cox, Cymon J.
    Medina, Rafael
    Devos, Nicolas
    Vanderpoorten, Alain
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Bell, Neil E.
    Shevock, James R.
    Aguero, Blanka
    Quandt, Dietmar
    Wickett, Norman J.
    Shaw, A. Jonathan
    Goffinet, Bernard
    Resolution of the ordinal phylogeny of mosses using targeted exons from organellar and nuclear genomes2019In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, p. 1485 (1-11)-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 306.
    Loizides, Michael
    et al.
    Limassol, Cyprus.
    Alvarado, Pablo
    ALVALAB, Av. Bruselas 2‑3B, 33011 Oviedo, Spain.
    Moreau, Pierre-Arthur
    Faculté de Pharmacie Lille, Université de Lille, EA 4483 IMPECS, F‑59000 Lille, France.
    Assyov, Boris
    Halasů, Viktorie
    Stadler, Marc
    Rinaldi, Andrea
    Marques, Guilhermina
    Zervakis, Georgios I.
    Borovička, Jan
    Van Vooren, Nicolas
    Grebenc, Tine
    Richard, Franck
    Taşkin, Hatira
    Gube, Matthias
    Sammut, Carmel
    Agnello, Carlo
    Baroni, Timothy J.
    Crous, Pedro
    Fryssouli, Vassiliki
    Gonou, Zacharoula
    Guidori, Urbano
    Gulden, Gro
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Kristiansen, Roy
    Læssøe, Thomas
    Mateos, Javier
    Miller, Andrew
    Moreno, Gabriel
    Perić, Branislav
    Polemis, Elias
    Salom, Joan Carles
    Siquier, José Leonardo
    Snabl, Martin
    Weholt, Øyvind
    Bellanger, Jean-Michel
    Has taxonomic vandalism gone too far? A case study, the rise of the pay-to-publish model and the pitfalls of Morchella systematics2022In: Mycological progress, ISSN 1617-416X, E-ISSN 1861-8952, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 7-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Morchella has gone through turbulent taxonomic treatments. Although significant progress in Morchella systematics has been achieved in the past decade, several problems remain unresolved and taxonomy in the genus is still in flux. In late 2019, a paper published in the open-access journal Scientific Reports raised serious concerns about the taxonomic stability of the genus, but also about the future of academic publishing. The paper, entitled “High diversity of Morchella and a novel lineage of the esculenta clade from the north Qinling Mountains revealed by GCPSR-based study” by Phanpadith and colleagues, suffered from gross methodological errors, included false results and artifactual phylogenies, had misapplied citations throughout, and proposed a new species name invalidly. Although the paper was eventually retracted by Scientific Reports in 2021, the fact that such an overtly flawed and scientifically unsound paper was published in a high-ranked Q1 journal raises alarming questions about quality controls and safekeeping procedures in scholarly publishing. Using this paper as a case study, we provide a critical review on the pitfalls of Morchella systematics followed by a series of recommendations for the delimitation of species, description of taxa, and ultimately for a sustainable taxonomy in Morchella. Problems and loopholes in the academic publishing system are also identified and discussed, and additional quality controls in the pre- and post-publication stages are proposed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 307. Long, David G.
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Notes on an overlooked Oncophorus (Bryophyta, Dicranaceae) in East Asia2020In: Chenia, Vol. 14, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 308. Low, Gabriel
    et al.
    Chattopadhyay, Balaji
    Garg, Kritika
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Yap, G
    Tang, Q
    Wu, S
    Rheindt, Frank E.
    Urban landscape genomics identifies fine-scale gene flow patterns in an avian invasive2018In: Heredity, ISSN 0018-067X, E-ISSN 1365-2540, Vol. 120, p. 138-153Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 309.
    Lähteenaro, Meri
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden;Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden.
    Straka, Jakub
    Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science Charles University Prague Czech Republic.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Hovmöller, Rasmus
    Department of Zoology Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden;SLU Swedish Species Information Centre Uppsala Sweden.
    Nakase, Yuta
    Faculty of the Arts Kyoto University of the Arts Kyoto Japan.
    Nilsson, Anders L.
    Museum of Evolution, Uppsala University Uppsala Sweden.
    Smit, John T.
    Naturalis Biodiversity Center Leiden The Netherlands;European Invertebrate Survey Leiden The Netherlands.
    Nylander, Johan A A
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. NBIS.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden;Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden.
    Phylogenomic species delimitation of the twisted‐winged parasite genus Stylops (Strepsiptera)2023In: Systematic Entomology, ISSN 0307-6970, E-ISSN 1365-3113Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 310. Löfstrand, Stefan
    et al.
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    The tribe Guettardeae and Hymenodictyeae-Naucleeae clade (subfamily Cinchonoideae)2022In: The new Natural History of Madagascar / [ed] S. Goodman, USA: Princeton University Press, 2022, p. 753-755Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 311. Löfstrand, Stefan
    et al.
    Taylor, Charlotte
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Rydin, Catarina
    Phylogenetic relationships, infrageneric classification and species limits in the Neotropical genus Faramea (Coussareeae: Rubiaceae)2021In: Botanical journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4074, E-ISSN 1095-8339, Vol. 197, p. 478-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Faramea is characterized by white or blue, tetramerous corollas and blue-black, fleshy fruits with a single, large pyrene. Both infrageneric relationships and species boundaries are poorly understood in the genus. This study represents the first broad-scale phylogenetic study of Faramea, with 80 of the c. 170 species sampled, 24 by two or more specimens. We aimed to include specimens representing the entire geographical, morphological and ecological ranges of the genus. Morphological characters historically utilized to delimit infrageneric sections in Faramea (e.g. bract and pyrene forms) were also evaluated. Only one of the currently accepted infrageneric sections was recovered as monophyletic (within a complex of species from other sections) and none of the morphological features traditionally utilized to determine infrageneric relationships in the genus was found to be uniquely diagnostic of a larger clade. Some Faramea lineages appear to be geographically isolated, with several clades containing solely specimens collected in the Atlantic Forest biomes. Of the 24 species represented by at least two specimens, 11 were supported as monophyletic, ten as non-monophyletic and three were not resolved as either monophyletic nor non-monophyletic. The results of the present study constitute a good basis for future studies of taxonomy, biogeography and ecology of Faramea.

  • 312. Lücking, Robert
    et al.
    Tehler, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Bungartz, Frank
    Lumbsch, H. Thorsten
    Journey from the west: did tropical Graphidaceae (Lichenized Ascomycota2013In: American Journal of Botany, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 844-856Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 313.
    Malm, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nyman, Tommi
    Department of Ecosystems in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    Phylogeny of the symphytan grade of Hymenoptera: new pieces into the old jigsaw(fly) puzzle2015In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031, Vol. 31, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Hymenoptera constitutes one of the largest, and ecologically and economically most important, insect orders. During thepast decade, a number of hypotheses on the phylogenetic relationships among hymenopteran families and superfamilies have beenpresented, based on analyses of molecular and/or morphological data. Nevertheless, many questions still remain, particularly concerningrelationships within the hyperdiverse suborder Apocrita, but also when it comes to the evolutionary history of the ancestrallyherbivorous “sawfly” lineages that form the basal, paraphyletic grade Symphyta. Because a large part of the uncertaintyappears to stem from limited molecular and taxonomic sampling, we set out to investigate the phylogeny of Hymenoptera usingnine protein-coding genes, of which five are new to analyses of the order. In addition, we more than tripled the taxon coverageacross the symphytan grade, introducing representatives for many previously unsampled lineages. We recover a well supportedphylogenetic structure for these early herbivorous hymenopteran clades, with new information regarding the monophyly of Xyelidae,the placement of the superfamily Pamphilioidea as sister to Tenthredinoidea + Unicalcarida, as well as the interrelationshipsamong the tenthredinoid families Tenthredinidae, Cimbicidae, and Diprionidae. Based on the obtained phylogenies, and to preventparaphyly of Tenthredinidae, we propose erection of the tribe Heptamelini to family status (Heptamelidae). In particular, ourresults give new insights into subfamilial relationships within the Tenthredinidae and other species-rich sawfly families. Thee xpanded gene set provides a useful toolbox for future detailed analyses of symphytan subgroups, especially within the diversesuperfamily Tenthredinoidea.

  • 314. Marki, Petter Z.
    et al.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Jønsson, Knud A.
    Molecular phylogenetics and species limits in a cryptically coloured radiation of Australo-Papuan passerine birds (Pachycephalidae: Colluricincla)2018In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 124, p. 100-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detailed knowledge of species limits is an essential component of the study of biodiversity. Although accurate species delimitation usually requires detailed knowledge of both genetic and phenotypic variation, such variation may be limited or unavailable for some groups. In this study, we reconstruct a molecular phylogeny for all currently recognized species and subspecies of Australasian shrikethrushes (Colluricincla), including the first sequences of the poorly known C. tenebrosa. Using a novel method for species delimitation, the multi-rate Poisson Tree Process (mPTP), in concordance with the phylogenetic data, we estimate species limits in this genetically diverse, but phenotypically subtly differentiated complex of birds. In line with previous studies, we find that one species, the little shrikethrush (C. megarhyncha) is characterized by deep divergences among populations. Delimitation results suggest that these clades represent distinct species and we consequently propose a new classification. Furthermore, our findings suggest that C. megarhyncha melanorhyncha of Biak Island does not belong in this genus, but is nested within the whistlers (Pachycephala) as sister to P. phaionota. This study represents a useful example of species delimitation when phenotypic variation is limited or poorly defined.

  • 315.
    Mattupalli, Chakradhar
    et al.
    Noble Research Institute, LLC, Ardmore, OK 73401, U.S.A.;Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Mount Vernon NWREC, Mount Vernon, WA 98273, U.S.A..
    Cuenca, Fernanda Proaño
    Institute for Biosecurity and Microbial Forensics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, U.S.A.;Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, U.S.A..
    Shiller, Jason B.
    Noble Research Institute, LLC, Ardmore, OK 73401, U.S.A.;Scion, Rotorua 3046, New Zealand.
    Watkins, Tara
    Noble Research Institute, LLC, Ardmore, OK 73401, U.S.A.;Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, U.S.A..
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Garzon, Carla D.
    Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, Delaware Valley University, Doylestown, PA 18901, U.S.A..
    Marek, Stephen M.
    Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, U.S.A..
    Young, Carolyn A.
    Noble Research Institute, LLC, Ardmore, OK 73401, U.S.A.;Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, U.S.A..
    Genetic Diversity of Phymatotrichopsis omnivora Based on Mating Type and Microsatellite Markers Reveals Heterothallic Mating System2022In: Plant Disease, ISSN 0191-2917, E-ISSN 1943-7692, Vol. 106, no 8, p. 2105-2116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phymatotrichopsis omnivora is a member of Pezizomycetes and causes root rot disease on a broad range of dicotyledonous plants. Using recently generated draft genome sequence data from four P. omnivora isolates, we developed simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and identified both mating type genes (MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1) in this fungus. To understand the genetic diversity of P. omnivora isolates (n = 43) and spore mats (n = 29) collected from four locations (Oklahoma, Texas, Arizona, and Mexico) and four host crops (cotton, alfalfa, peach, and soybean), we applied 24 SSR markers and showed that of the 72 P. omnivora isolates and spore mats tested, 41 were distinct genotypes. Furthermore, the developed SSR markers did not show cross-transferability to other close relatives of P. omnivora in the class Pezizomycetes. A multiplex PCR detecting both mating type idiomorphs and a reference gene (TUB2) was developed to screen P. omnivora isolates. Based on the dataset we tested, P. omnivora is a heterothallic fungus with both mating types present in the United States in a ratio close to 1:1. We tested P. omnivora spore mats obtained from spatially distinct disease rings that developed in a center-pivot alfalfa field and showed that both mating types can be present not only in the same field but also within a single spore mat. This study shows that P. omnivora has the genetic toolkit for generating sexually diverse progeny, providing impetus for future studies that focus on identifying sexual morphs in nature.

  • 316. Mayr, Gerald
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Evidence for a sister group relationship between the Madagascan mesites (Mesitornithidae) and cuckoos (Cuculidae)2004In: Senckenbergiana Biologica, ISSN 0037-2102, Vol. 84, no 1/2, p. 119-135Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 317. Mayr, Gerald
    et al.
    Manegold, Albrecht
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Monophyletic groups within "higher land birds" - comparison of morphological and molecular data.2003In: Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, ISSN 0947-5745, E-ISSN 1439-0469, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 233-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 318. Mehner, Thomas
    et al.
    Palm, Stefan
    Delling, Bo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Karjalainen, Juha
    Kiełpińska, Jolanta
    Vogt, Asja
    Freyhof, Jörg
    Genetic relationships between sympatric and allopatric Coregonus ciscoes in North and Central Europe2021In: BMC Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2730-7182, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 319. Michat, Mariano
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Larval description and chaetotaxic analysis of Dineutus sinuosipennis Laporte, 1840, with a key for the identification of larvae of the tribe Dineutini (Coleoptera, Gyrinidae).2017In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 718, p. 95-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The larvae of the Malagasy whirligig beetle Dineutus sinuosipennis Laporte, 1840, identified using DNA sequence data, are described and illustrated for the first time, including detailed morphometric and chaetotaxic analyses of selected structures and a description of larval habitat. Larvae of the genus Dineutus Macleay, 1825 are diagnosed, and a key to identify the genera of the tribe Dineutini is presented. Larvae of Dineutus exhibit the characters traditionally recognized as autapomorphies of the Gyrinidae: body less sclerotized, egg bursters located on the parietal, one additional sensorial plate on the third antennomere, cardo and lacinia well developed, prementum completely divided, abdominal tracheal gills, and four terminal hooks on the pygopod. They also share with larvae of the other Dineutini genera these putative synapomorphies: numerous minute pore-like additional structures on the ultimate maxillary and labial palpomeres, coxal primary seta CO12 inserted submedially, and trochanteral primary seta TR2 absent. Larvae of Dineutus can be distinguished from those of other known genera of Dineutini by the posterior margin of the lacinia not dentate, tracheal gills plumose, parietal seta PA5 inserted relatively far from setae PA7–9, mandibular pores MNb and MNc inserted relatively far from each other, and tarsal seta TA1 inserted submedially.

  • 320. Millanes, A.M.
    et al.
    Diederich, P.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Cyphobasidium gen. nov., a new lichen-inhabiting taxon in the Cystobasidiomycetes (Pucciniomycotina, Basidiomycota, Fungi).2016In: Fungal Biology, ISSN 1878-6146, E-ISSN 1878-6162, Vol. 120, p. 1468-1477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 321. Millanes, A.M.
    et al.
    Diederich, P.
    Westberg, M
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Crittendenia gen. nov., a new lichenicolous lineage in the Agaricostilbomycetes (Pucciniomycotina), and a review of the biology, phylogeny and classification of lichenicolous heterobasidiomycetes.2021In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 53, p. 103-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 322. Millanes, A.M.
    et al.
    Diederich, P.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Knutsson, Tommy
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Tremella rhizocarpicola sp. nov. and other interesting Tremellales and Filobasidiales in the Nordic countries2014In: MycoKeys, ISSN 1314-4057, E-ISSN 1314-4049, Vol. 8, p. 31-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 323. Millanes, A.M.
    et al.
    Diederich, P.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Pippola, E
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Tremella cetrariellae (Tremellales, Basidiomycota, Fungi), a new lichenicolous species on Cetrariella delisei2015In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 47, p. 359-368Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 324. Millanes, A.M.
    et al.
    Diederich, P.
    Westberg, Martin
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Three new species in the Biatoropsis usnearum complex.2016In: Herzogia, ISSN 0018-0971, Vol. 29, p. 337-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 325. Millanes, A.M.
    et al.
    Truong, C.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Diederich, P.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Host switching promotes diversity in host-specialized mycoparasitic fungi: uncoupled evolution in the Biatoropsis-Usnea system2014In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 68, p. 1576-1593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 326. Millanes, A.M.
    et al.
    Zamora, J.C.
    Keizer, P.J.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Nieuwe inzichten in de Tremellomyceten2018In: Coolia, Vol. 61, p. 33-49Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 327.
    Miller, Kelly
    et al.
    University of New Mexico.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Diving Beetles of the World - Systematics and Biology of the Dytiscidae.2016Book (Other academic)
  • 328.
    Miller, Kelly
    et al.
    University of New Mexico.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The phylogeny and classification of predaceous diving beetles.2014In: Ecology, Systematics and the Natural History of Predaceous Diving Beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) / [ed] Donald A Yee, Springer, 2014, p. 49-172Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The phylogenetics and higher (family-group) classifi cation of extant

    members of the beetle family Dytiscidae (Coleoptera), or predaceous diving beetles,

    is reviewed and reassessed. A phylogenetic analysis of the family is presented based

    on 168 species of diving beetles and 9 outgroup taxa from Gyrinidae, Noteridae,

    Amphizoidae and Paelobiidae. All currently recognized dytiscid subfamilies and

    tribes are represented, most by multiple genera and species. Data include 104 morphological

    characters and approximately 6,700 aligned bases from 9 DNA sequence

    fragments from cytochrome c oxidase I  (COI) and II  (COII), histone III  (H3), 16S

    rRNA  (16S), 12S rRNA  (12S), arginine kinase  (argkin), RNA polymerase II  (RNA

    pol II), elongation factor 1 alpha  (Ef1α ), and wingless  (wnt). Parsimony and

    Bayesian analyses were conducted. The topology of the parsimony tree (consensus

    of 13 equally parsimonious solutions) exhibits numerous anomalies inconsistent

    with convincing morphological features and the Bayesian results and has,

    generally, relatively poor bootstrap support for major clades. The Bayesian topology

    is more consistent with major morphological features and has strong support 

     for most clades, and conclusions are based primarily on this estimate. Major

    higher-level phylogenetic relationships with strong support include: (1) monophyly

    of Dytiscidae Leach, (2) Matinae Branden sister to the rest of Dytiscidae,

    (3) Agabinae Thomson + Colymbetinae Erichson, (4) Hydrodytinae

    Miller + Hydroporinae Aubé, (5) Dytiscinae Leach + Laccophilinae Gistel +

    Cybistrini Sharp + Copelatinae Branden, (6) monophyly of the subfamilies Matinae,

    Colymbetinae, Copelatinae, Coptotominae Branden, Lancetinae Branden,

    Laccophilinae (including Agabetes  Crotch), Agabinae (support weaker than in other

    subfamilies) and Hydroporinae (monophyly of Hydrodytinae not tested), (7) paraphyly

    of Dytiscinae with Cybistrini sister to Laccophilinae (with strong support)

    and this clade sister to other Dytiscinae, and (8) monophyly of both Agabini

    ( Agabus  -group of genera) and Hydrotrupini Roughley ( Hydrotrupes  Sharp and the

    Platynectes  -group of genera). Major conclusions regarding tribes within

    Hydroporinae include: (1) monophyly of the tribes Vatellini Sharp, Methlini

    Branden, Hydrovatini Sharp, Hygrotini Portevin, Hyphydrini Gistel (without

    Pachydrus  Sharp) and Bidessini Sharp (including Peschetius  Guignot, Hydrodessus

     J. Balfour-Browne and Amarodytes  Régimbart) (monophyly of Laccornini

    Wolfe and Roughley and Pachydrini Biström, Nilsson and Wewalka not tested),

    (2) Pachydrini is a problematic, long-branched taxa resolved here as sister to

    Hydrovatini but with weak support, (3) Hydroporini monophyletic except for

    Laccornellus  Roughley and Wolfe and Canthyporus  Zimmermann, (4) Laccornellus

     and Canthyporus  together monophyletic and sister to Hydroporinae except

    Laccornini. Four groups are resolved within Hydroporini exclusive of

    Laccornellus  + Canthyporus  corresponding to the Deronectes  -, the Graptodytes  -,

    the Necterosoma  - and the Hydroporus  -groups of genera. The classifi cation of

    Dytiscidae is revised with the following taxonomic changes: (1) Hydrotrupini is

    recognized as a tribe of Agabinae including the genus Hydrotrupes  and the

    Platynectes  -group of genera ( new status  ), (2) the genus Rugosus  García is moved

    from Colymbetinae to Copelatinae ( new placement  ), (3) Cybistrini is elevated

    from tribe rank within Dytiscinae to subfamily of Dytiscidae ( new rank  ), (4)

    Hyderodini Miller is placed as a junior synonym of Dytiscini ( new synonymy  ), (5)

    Laccornellus  and Canthyporus  are removed from Hydroporini and placed in their

    own tribe, Laccornellini ( new tribe  ), (6) the following family group names are

    resurrected from synonymy with Hydroporini and placed as subtribes within

    Hydroporini, Deronectina Galewski (for the Deronectes  -group of genera, new

    status  ), Siettitiina Smrž (for the Graptodytes  -group of genera, new status  ),

    Sternopriscina Branden (for the Necterosoma  -group of genera, new status  ), and

    Hydroporina (for the Hydroporus  -group of genera, new status  ), (7) Carabhydrini

    Watts is placed as a junior synonym of Sternopriscina ( new synonymy  ), and

    (8) Hydrodessus  , formerly incerta sedis  with respect to tribe, is placed in Bidessini

    ( new placement  ). Each subfamily, tribe and subtribe is diagnosed and its taxonomic

    history discussed.

  • 329.
    Miller, Kelly
    et al.
    University of New Mexico.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The phylogeny and classification of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)2023In: Ecology, systematics and the natural history of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera. Dytiscidae) / [ed] Donald A. Yee, Springer, 2023, 2, p. 55-185Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 330. Miller, Webb
    et al.
    Drautz, Daniela I
    Janecka, Jan E
    Lesk, Arthur M
    Ratan, Aakrosh
    Tomsho, Lynn P
    Packard, Mike
    Zhang, Yeting
    McClellan, Lindsay R
    Qi, Ji
    Zhao, Fangqing
    Gilbert, M Thomas P
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Arsuaga, Juan Luis
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Huson, Daniel H
    Helgen, Kristofer M
    Murphy, William J
    Götherström, Anders
    Schuster, Stephan C
    The mitochondrial genome sequence of the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus).2009In: Genome Research, ISSN 1088-9051, E-ISSN 1549-5469, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 213-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the first two complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), or so-called Tasmanian tiger, extinct since 1936. The thylacine's phylogenetic position within australidelphian marsupials has long been debated, and here we provide strong support for the thylacine's basal position in Dasyuromorphia, aided by mitochondrial genome sequence that we generated from the extant numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus). Surprisingly, both of our thylacine sequences differ by 11%-15% from putative thylacine mitochondrial genes in GenBank, with one of our samples originating from a direct offspring of the previously sequenced individual. Our data sample each mitochondrial nucleotide an average of 50 times, thereby providing the first high-fidelity reference sequence for thylacine population genetics. Our two sequences differ in only five nucleotides out of 15,452, hinting at a very low genetic diversity shortly before extinction. Despite the samples' heavy contamination with bacterial and human DNA and their temperate storage history, we estimate that as much as one-third of the total DNA in each sample is from the thylacine. The microbial content of the two thylacine samples was subjected to metagenomic analysis, and showed striking differences between a wild-captured individual and a born-in-captivity one. This study therefore adds to the growing evidence that extensive sequencing of museum collections is both feasible and desirable, and can yield complete genomes.

  • 331. Moltesen, Maria
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Jønsson, Knud A
    Molecular phylogeny of Chloropseidae and Irenidae - cryptic species and biogeography.2012In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 903-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chloropseidae (Leafbirds) and Irenidae (Fairy-bluebirds) are colourful Oriental birds, which have been placed as a deep (old) branch in the radiation of passeroid songbirds. We present a densely sampled molecular phylogeny of the two families based on two nuclear introns (GAPDH and ODC) and two mitochondrial genes (ND3 and cyt-b) largely stemming from old museum specimens. Our results show that several subspecies within both Chloropseidae and Irenidae are genetically distinct and separated in the Miocene some 10-11Million years ago (Mya), indicating a substantial underestimation of species numbers within the two families. Based on our molecular findings, plumage distinctiveness and contemporary distributions we propose that several subspecies be recognised at the species level. Furthermore, we use the molecular data to examine biogeographical patterns of the two families in the light of historical geological re-arrangements in the region. The results indicate that the Philippines were colonised in the Pliocene and that colonisation probably progressed via the Sulu islands from Borneo and not via Palawan, which was first colonised in the Pleistocene.

  • 332. Monge, M.
    et al.
    Anderberg, Arne Alfred
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Samir, J.
    Nomenclatural novelties in Tessaria (Asteraceae, Inuleae): a new species from the Andes and uncovering the identity of T. boliviensis.2018In: Systematic Botany, ISSN 0363-6445, E-ISSN 1548-2324, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 591-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the study of Brazilian genera of the Inuleae-Plucheinae (Asteraceae), we have encountered a specimen representing an undescribed species, here described as Tessaria andina. The new species is characterized by having puberulous, tomentose, lanate, or glabrescent indumentum on its branches, a tomentose abaxial leaf surface, leaves with an apically serrate margin, corymbiform inflorescences, a cream to yellowish involucre, erect inner involucral bracts, and the corolla of male flowers with short-stalked glands and trichomes. So far, only one collection of this new species has been made, and that was more than forty years ago. The new species is described, illustrated, and its affinities are discussed. Furthermore, during this investigation we found out that the name Tessaria boliviensis is a nomen nudum, applied to material here shown tobelongto Tessaria fastigiata. An identification key to the species of Tessaria is also presented.

  • 333. Monge, Marcelo
    et al.
    Kilian, Norbert
    Anderberg, Arne Alfred
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Samir, Joao
    Two new records of Lactuca L. (Cichorieae, Asteraceae) from South America.2016In: Brasilian Journal oof Biosciences, ISSN 1678-2343, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lactuca indica and Lactuca canadensis have been recorded for the first time in the Americas and in South America, respectively. Lactuca indica is native to Eastern Asia, and L. canadensis to North America. In Brazil, L. indica is used as a substitute for lettuce in some communities. The leaf shape in the Brazilian plants of the two species is less variable than in Asiatic or North American populations. This could possibly be a result of a single introduction to Brazil of each species. Both species are weeds, occurring in disturbed habitats in south and south-eastern Brazil. The two species are described, illustrated and their affinities are discussed. An identification key is provided to the six species of Lactuca (all introduced) in South America.

  • 334.
    Moreau, Pierre-Arthur
    et al.
    Département des Sciences végétales et fongiques, EA 4483, UFR Pharmacie, Univ. Lille Nord de France, 59000 Lille, France.
    Bellanger, Jean-Michel
    CEFE, INSERM, Université Montpellier 2, Campus CNRS, 1919 Route de Mende, 34293 Montpellier, France.
    Clowez, Philippe
    56 place des Tilleuls, 60400 Pont-l’Evêque, France.
    Courtecuisse, Régis
    Département des Sciences végétales et fongiques, EA 4483, UFR Pharmacie, Univ. Lille Nord de France, 59000 Lille, France.
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Knudsen, Henning
    Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 2 C, 1353 Copenhagen K, Denmark.
    O’Donnell, Kerry
    NCAUR-ARS-USDA, Peoria, Illinois 61604, U.S.A..
    Richard, Franck
    CEFE, CNRS, Université Montpellier 2, Campus CNRS, 1919 Route de Mende, 34293 Montpellier, France.
    (2289) Proposal to conserve the name Morchella semilibera against Phallus crassipes, P. gigas and P. undosus (Ascomycota): Conserve Morchella semilibera2014In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 677-678Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 335. Morinière, Jérôme
    et al.
    Michat, Mariano
    Jäch, Manfred
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hendrich, Lars
    Balke, Michael
    Anisomeriini diving beetles – an Atlantic-Pacific Island disjunction on Tristan da Cunha and Robinson Crusoe Island, Juan Fernández?2015In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anisomeriini diving beetles contain only two enigmatic species, representing a remarkable disjunction between the Pacific Juan Fernández Islands (Anisomeria bistriata) and the South Atlantic Tristan da Cunha Archipelago (Senilites tristanicola). They belong to the Colymbetinae, which contain 140 species worldwide. Here we aim to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the Anisomerinii and use > 9000 bp DNA sequence data from 13 fragments of 12 loci for a comprehensive sampling of Colymbetinae species. Analyses under different optimization criteria converge on very similar topologies, and show unambiguously that Anisomeria bistriata andSenilites tristanicola belong to the Neotropical Rhantus signatus species group, a comparatively recent clade within Colymbetinae. Anisomeriini therefore are synonomized with Colymbetini and both species are transferred to Rhantus accordingly, resulting in secondary homonymy of Rhantus bistriatus (Brullé, 1835) with Rhantus bistriatus (Bergsträsser, 1778). We propose the replacement name Rhantus selkirki Jäch, Balke & Michat nom. nov. for the Juan Fernández species. Presence of these species on remote islands is therefore not relictary, but the result of more recent range expansions out of mainland South America. Finally, we suggest that Carabdytini should be synonymized with Colymbetini. Our study underpins the Hennigian principle that a natural classification can be derived only from the search for shared apomorphies between species, not from differences.

  • 336. Morinière, Jérôme
    et al.
    Van Dam, Matthew H
    Hawlitschek, Oliver
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Michat, Mariano C
    Hendrich, Lars
    Ribera, Ignacio
    Toussaint, Emmanuel F A
    Balke, Michael
    Phylogenetic niche conservatism explains an inverse latitudinal diversity gradient in freshwater arthropods.2016In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The underlying mechanisms responsible for the general increase in species richness from temperate regions to the tropics remain equivocal. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain this astonishing pattern but additional empirical studies are needed to shed light on the drivers at work. Here we reconstruct the evolutionary history of the cosmopolitan diving beetle subfamily Colymbetinae, the majority of which are found in the Northern hemisphere, hence exhibiting an inversed latitudinal diversity gradient. We reconstructed a dated phylogeny using 12 genes, to investigate the biogeographical history and diversification dynamics in the Colymbetinae. We aimed to identify the role that phylogenetic niche conservatism plays in the inversed diversification pattern seen in this group. Our results suggest that Colymbetinae originated in temperate climates, which supports the hypothesis that their distribution is the result of an ancestral adaptation to temperate environmental conditions rather than tropical origins, and that temperate niche conservatism can generate and/or maintain inverse latitudinal diversity gradients.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 337. Mossberg, Bo
    et al.
    Stenberg, Lennart
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Svensk fältflora2021Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 338. Muggia, Lucia
    et al.
    Fernández-Brime, Samantha
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Grube, Martin
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Schizoxylon as an experimental model for studying interkingdom symbiosis.2016In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 92, article id fiw165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 339. Muggia, Lucia
    et al.
    Vancurova, Lucie
    Skaloud, Pavel
    Peksa, Ondrej
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Grube, Martin
    The symbiotic playground of lichen thalli - a highly flexible photobiont association in rock-inhabiting lichens2013In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 85, p. 313-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 340. Munzinger, Jérôme
    et al.
    Swenson, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Revision of Pycnandra subgenus Leptostylis and description of subgenus Wagapensia (Sapotaceae), a genus endemic to New Caledonia2015In: Australian Systematic Botany, ISSN 1030-1887, E-ISSN 1446-5701, Vol. 28, p. 91-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Pycnandra Benth. (Sapotaceae, Chrysophylloideae) is endemic to New Caledonia with 66 known species and is subdivided in six subgenera. We have earlier revised four of these subgenera and here continue with P. subgenus Leptostylis and describe P. subgenus Wagapensia. Subgenus Leptostylis is distinguished mainly by its opposite leaves and four sepals, and includes eight species, of which two are described as new (P. amplexicaulis and P. sclerophylla). Two species, P. longiflora and P. micrantha, are assumed extinct because extensive fieldwork has not been able to relocate the plants. Variation in leaf morphology was observed in Leptostylis gatopensis, which is by consequence considered as synonym of Pycnandra filipes. Two additional taxa belong to this subgenus, but cannot presently be described because sufficient fertile material is unavailable. Subgenus Wagapensia is monotypic and readily distinguished on the basis of its subverticillate leaves and leafy shoots usually borne beneath apical clusters of leaves, a character common in Sapotaceae but unique in Pycnandra. The members of P. subgenus Leptostylis occur mainly in maquis vegetation or sclerophyllous forests on ultramafic soil, but three taxa are confined to calcareous areas. Mining activities in New Caledonian ultramafic areas are extensive and because some of these species are naturally rare, IUCN Red List assessments are provided to all species. Pycnandra grandifolia and P. wagapensis are assigned the IUCN status Vulnerable, P. amplexicaulis and P. sclerophylla are considered Endangered, P. filipes subspecies multiflora and P. goroensis are considered to be Critically Endangered, whereas P. micrantha and P. longiflora appear to be extinct.

  • 341.
    Nguyen, Nhu H.
    et al.
    Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720.
    Landeros, Fidel
    Departamento de Bota´nica y Zoologı´a, Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico.
    Garibay-Orijel, Roberto
    Instituto de Biologı´a, Universidad Nacional Auto´noma de Me´xico, Mexico.
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Vellinga, Else C.
    Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720.
    The Helvella lacunosa species complex in western NorthAmerica: cryptic species, misapplied names and parasites2013In: Mycologia, ISSN 0027-5514, E-ISSN 1557-2536, Vol. 105, no 5, p. 1275-1286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 342. Nilsson, Anders N.
    et al.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bilton, David
    Cuppen, J
    Van Ee, Gert
    Gabrielsson, Folke
    Geijer, Joja
    Hendrich, Lars
    Köhler, J
    van Maanen, B
    Shaverdo, Helena
    Vorst, Oscar
    Foster, Garth N
    Water beetles recorded at the Balfour-Browne Club midsummer camp at Abisko in 20192020In: Latissimus, Vol. 48, p. 1-12Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 343. Nilsson, Anders N.
    et al.
    Geijer, Joja
    Shaverdo, Helena
    Naturhistorisches Museum Wien.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Larval morphology of Agabus clypealis (Thomson, 1867) and A. pseudoclypealis Scholz, 1933 and notes on their distribution (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)2017In: Aquatic Insects, ISSN 0165-0424, E-ISSN 1744-4152, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 141-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The third instar larvae of Agabus clypealis (Thomson, 1867) and A. pseudoclypealis Scholz, 1933 are described. Important morphological structures (head, legs, and abdominal segment 8 with urogomphi) are illustrated. Both species share a completely sclerotized abdominal segment 6 with A. setulosus (J. Sahlberg, 1895). Morphological characters and species phenology are discussed in relation to the A. confinis-species group. All available literature records and some new and additional data on distribution of the two species are provided. Agabus clypealis is recorded for the first time from Estonia, and there is no reason to doubt the records of A. pseudoclypealis from Kazakhstan.

  • 344.
    Nilsson, R Henrik
    et al.
    GU.
    Hyde, Kevin D.
    Pawlowska, Julia
    Ryberg, Martin
    Tedersoo, Leho
    Aas, Anders Bjornsgard
    Alias, Siti A.
    Alves, Artur
    Anderson, Cajsa Lisa
    Antonelli, Alexandre
    Arnold, A. Elizabeth
    Bahnmann, Barbara
    Bahram, Mohammad
    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan
    Berlin, Anna
    Branco, Sara
    Chomnunti, Putarak
    Dissanayake, Asha
    Drenkhan, Rein
    Friberg, Hanna
    Froslev, Tobias Guldberg
    Halwachs, Bettina
    Hartmann, Martin
    Henricot, Beatrice
    Jayawardena, Ruvishika
    Jumpponen, Ari
    Kauserud, Havard
    Koskela, Sonja
    Kulik, Tomasz
    Liimatainen, Kare
    Lindahl, Bjorn D.
    Lindner, Daniel
    Liu, Jian-Kui
    Maharachchikumbura, Sajeewa
    Manamgoda, Dimuthu
    Martinsson, Svante
    Neves, Maria Alice
    Niskanen, Tuula
    Nylinder, Nylinder
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Pereira, Olinto Liparini
    Pinho, Danilo Batista
    Porter, Teresita M.
    Queloz, Valentin
    Riit, Taavi
    Sanchez-Garcia, Marisol
    de Sousa, Filipe
    Stefanczyk, Emil
    Tadych, Mariusz
    Takamatsu, Susumu
    Tian, Qing
    Udayanga, Dhanushka
    Unterseher, Martin
    Wang, Zheng
    Wikee, Saowanee
    Yan, Jiye
    Larsson, Ellen
    Larsson, Karl-Henrik
    Koljalg, Urmas
    Abarenkov, Kessy
    Improving ITS sequence data for identification of plant pathogenic fungi2014In: Fungal diversity, ISSN 1560-2745, E-ISSN 1878-9129, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant pathogenic fungi are a large and diverse assemblage of eukaryotes with substantial impacts on natural ecosystems and human endeavours. These taxa often have complex and poorly understood life cycles, lack observable, discriminatory morphological characters, and may not be amenable to in vitro culturing. As a result, species identification is frequently difficult. Molecular (DNA sequence) data have emerged as crucial information for the taxonomic identification of plant pathogenic fungi, with the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region being the most popular marker. However, international nucleotide sequence databases are accumulating numerous sequences of compromised or low-resolution taxonomic annotations and substandard technical quality, making their use in the molecular identification of plant pathogenic fungi problematic. Here we report on a concerted effort to identify high-quality reference sequences for various plant pathogenic fungi and to re-annotate incorrectly or insufficiently annotated public ITS sequences from these fungal lineages. A third objective was to enrich the sequences with geographical and ecological metadata. The results - a total of 31,954 changes - are incorporated in and made available through the UNITE database for molecular identification of fungi (including standalone FASTA files of sequence data for local BLAST searches, use in the next-generation sequencing analysis platforms QIIME and mothur, and related applications. The present initiative is just a beginning to cover the wide spectrum of plant pathogenic fungi, and we invite all researchers with pertinent expertise to join the annotation effort.

  • 345. Norhazrina, Nik
    et al.
    Patiño, Jairo
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Wang, Jian
    Vanderpoorten, Alain
    Taxonomic significanceof variation in sexual condition in PelekiumMitt. and related genera (Thuidiaceae)2017In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 39, p. 121-127Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 346. Norhazrina, Nik
    et al.
    Vanderpoorten, Alain
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Patiño, Jairo
    What are the evolutionary mechanisms explaining the similar species richness patterns in tropical mosses? Insights from the phylogeny of the pantropical genus Pelekium2016In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 105, p. 139-145Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 347. Norman, Janette A
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Jønsson, Knud A
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Christidis, Les
    A multi-gene phylogeny reveals novel relationships for aberrant genera of Australo-Papuan core Corvoidea and polyphyly of the Pachycephalidae and Psophodidae (Aves: Passeriformes).2009In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 488-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core Corvoidea is the largest and most diverse oscine assemblage within the Australo-Papuan region. Although central to an understanding of the evolutionary history and biogeography of the group the composition and intergeneric relationships of the Australo-Papuan radiation remain poorly understood. Here we analysed DNA sequence data from two nuclear gene regions and the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, for 40 species of core Corvoidea to test the systematic affinities of key Australo-Papuan lineages. The families Pachycephalidae (whistlers, shrike-thrushes and allies) and Psophodidae (whipbirds, quail-thrush and allies) were both recovered as polyphyletic assemblages. The core pachycephaline assemblage comprised Pachycephala, Colluricincla, parts of Pitohui, and Falcunculus with the remaining genera resolving as four divergent lineages with no clearly defined affinities. Ptilorrhoa and Cinclosoma (Cinclosomatidae) formed a clade separate from Psophodes (Psophodidae) but neither clade showed clear affinities to any other taxa. Novel relationships were also identified for three aberrant New Guinean genera; ditypic Machaerirhynchus and monotypic Rhagologus were both nested within an assemblage that included the Artamidae and African malaconotoids (bush-shrikes and allies) while the enigmatic Ifrita was found to be part of an assemblage that included the Monarchidae and Paradisaeidae.

  • 348.
    Norén, Michael
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nydén, Thomas
    Emåförbundet.
    Johansson, Peter
    Emåförbundet.
    Multiple origins of stone loach, Barbatula barbatula (Teleostei: Nemacheilidae), in Sweden based on mitochondrial DNA2018In: Journal of Applied Ichthyology, ISSN 0175-8659, E-ISSN 1439-0426, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 58-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stone loach, Barbatula barbatula, occurs in scattered localities in Sweden. Some of thepopulations have usually been considered as feral descendants of escaped 18thCentury pond stock, but historical documentation is inconclusive. Using the mitochondrialCOI gene as a marker, we analyzed specimens from seven Swedish localities. Oneof the middle Swedish localities, in Stockholm, belongs to a haplotype found also inPoland and Lithuania. Two other samples, from near Nyköping and Lake Hjälmaren,belong to a haplotype found in northeastern Europe (Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Volgabasin in Russia). Those two Swedish populations are probably descendants from atleast two introductions, probably for pond rearing for human consumption. Samplesfrom Skåne and Halland in southern Sweden belong to the haplotype found inDenmark, northern Germany and Poland; and whereas it remains possible that theyalso represent feral populations, they may be naturally occurring, having reachedSweden during the Ancylus period, about 8,000–10,000 years ago. A recently discoveredpopulation from the central South Swedish Highlands belongs to a mainly southeastern European haplotype. It probably represents a release of imported aquariumspecimens or live bait carried by sport fishing tourists.

  • 349.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Anderberg, Arne Alfred
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Phylogeny of the Inuleae (Asteraceae) with special emphasis on the Inuleae-Plucheinae.2015In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 110-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships in the tribe Inuleae (Asteraceae, sunflower family) are elucidated based on a concatenated set of nuclear (ETS, ITS), and chloroplast data (ndhF, trnL-F, trnH-psbA), analysed by Bayesian and parsimony methods. Extensive sampling of representatives from both subtribes Inuleae-Inulinae and Inuleae-Plucheinae establish their reciprocal monophyly, and result in the first-ever resolved molecular phylogeny of the Inuleae-Plucheinae with new insights into the relationships and morphological character distributions between genera and among species. Of the 31 accepted genera in the Inuleae-Plucheinae, only Pseudoblepharispermum is not represented in this study, 12 monotypic genera are placed in the phylogeny, 13 genera are shown to be monophyletic, and only 5 of the remaining 18 genera are revealed to be polyphyletic. The implications for the nomenclature status of the monotypic and polyphyletic genera are discussed, together with a descriptive review of morphological characters traditionally used to circumscribe the genera in this subtribe.

  • 350.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lemey, Philippe
    KU Leuven, Rega Institute.
    de Bruyn, Mark
    Bangor University, Biological Sciences.
    Suchard, Mark
    UCLA, Human Genetics.
    Pfeil, Bernard
    University of Gothenburg, Biological and Environmental Sciences.
    Walsh, Neville
    National Herbarium of Victoria.
    Anderberg, Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    On the Biogeography of Centipeda: A Species Tree Diffusion Approach2014In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, no 63, p. 178-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reconstructing the biogeographic history of groups present in continuous arid landscapes is challenging dueto the difficulties in defining discrete areas for analyses, and even more so when species largely overlap both in terms ofgeography and habitat preference. In this study, we use a novel approach to estimate ancestral areas for the small plantgenus Centipeda. We apply continuous diffusion of geography by a relaxed random walk where each species is sampledfrom its extant distribution on an empirical distribution of time-calibrated species-trees. Using a distribution of previouslypublished substitution rates of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) for Asteraceae, we show how the evolution of Centipedacorrelates with the temporal increase of aridity in the arid zone since the Pliocene. Geographic estimates of ancestral speciesshow a consistent pattern of speciation of early lineages in the Lake Eyre region, with a division in more northerly andsoutherly groups since ∼840 ka. Summarizing the geographic slices of species-trees at the time of the latest speciation event(∼20 ka), indicates no presence of the genus in Australia west of the combined desert belt of the Nullabor Plain, the GreatVictoria Desert, the Gibson Desert, and the Great Sandy Desert, or beyond the main continental shelf of Australia. Theresult indicates all western occurrences of the genus to be a result of recent dispersal rather than ancient vicariance. Thisstudy contributes to our understanding of the spatiotemporal processes shaping the flora of the arid zone, and offers asignificant improvement in inference of ancestral areas for any organismal group distributed where it remains difficult todescribe geography in terms of discrete areas.

45678910 301 - 350 of 559
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf