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  • 301.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G.P.
    Blom, Mozes
    Irestedt, Martin
    The phylogenetic position of the extinct Cuban Macaw Ara tricolor based on complete mitochondrial genome sequences2018In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 160, p. 666-672Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 302.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G.P.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Irestedt, Martin
    The phylogenetic position of the world´s smallest passerine, the Pygmy Bushtit Psaltria exilis2016In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 158, p. 519-529Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 303.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Bowie, Rauri C.K.
    Phylogenetic relationships witihn Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): A review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers.2008In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 858-876Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 304.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Lokugalappatti, L.G. Sampath
    Bowie, Rauri C.K.
    A nuclear DNA phylogeny and a proposed taxonomic revision of African greenbuls (Aves, Passeriformes, Pycnonotidae)2007In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 417-427Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 305.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Ericson, Per G.P.
    Patterns of phylogenetic diversification in the Dollarbird (Eurystomus orientalis) and Azure Roller (Eurystomus azureus) complex2023In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 189, article id 107909Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 306.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Parsons, Thomas J.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Basal phylogeny of the Tyrannoidea based on comparisons of cytochrome b and exons of nuclear c-myc and RAG-1 genes2002In: The AUK: A Quarterly Journal of Ornithology, ISSN 0004-8038, E-ISSN 1938-4254, Vol. 119, no 4, p. 984-995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outlines of the phylogenetic relationships within the New World suboscine clade Tyrannoidea were investigated on the basis of nucleotide sequence data from two nuclear genes (c-myc and RAG-1) and one mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b), totaling over 2,400 bp. Representatives of the major tyrannoid lineages were sequenced, including Pachyramphus, Schiffornis, Tityra, and Oxyruncus. The data set with the three genes combined was analyzed under both the parsimony and maximum-likelihood criteria and under different character weighting schemes. The analyses resulted in similar topologies that differed only in poorly supported nodes. The three manakins (Pipra, Manacus, and Chiroxiphia) included in this study were found to be monophyletic, whereas Schiffornis—sometimes also considered to be a manakin—did not group with the manakins, but occurred with Pachyramphus and Tityra in the clade Tityrinae. The two clades Pipromorphinae and Tyranninae are also strongly supported in this analysis and appear as sister groups, thus supporting the monophyly of the tyrant flycatcher assemblage. Phytotoma was placed with the only cotingid species included in this analysis, whereas the position of Oxyruncus was unresolved.

  • 307.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Martin, Irestedt
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Ericson, Per G.P.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogenetic relationships of rollers (Coraciidae) based on complete mitochondrial genomesand fifteen nuclear genes2018In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 126, p. 17-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 308.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    Ohlson, Jan I.
    Tietze, Dieter Thomas
    Reconstruction of the Late Miocene Biogeographic History of Tits and Chickadees (Aves: Passeriformes: Paridae) – a Comparison between Discrete Area Analyses and ProbabilisticDiffusion Approach2018In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 45, p. 14-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 309.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Parsons, Thomas J.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Clades within the 'higher land birds', evaluated bg nuclear DNA sequences2001In: Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, ISSN 0947-5745, E-ISSN 1439-0469, Vol. 39, no 1-2, p. 37-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigated the phylogenetic relationships within the 'higher land birds' by parsimony analysis of nucleotide DNA sequences obtained from the two nuclear, protein-coding genes, c-myc and RAG-I. Nuclear genes have not previously been used to address this phylogenetic question. The results include high jackknife support for a monophyletic Apodiformes (including the Trochilidae). This arrangement was further supported by the observation of an insertion of four amino acids in the c-myc gene in all apodiform taxa. Monophyly was also inferred for each of the two piciform groups Galbulae and Pici. Within Pici, the Capitonidae was found to be paraphyletic, with the New World barbers more closely related to the Ramphastidae than to the Old World barbers. Another clade with high jackknife support consists of the Upupidae, Phoeniculidae and Bucerotidae. The families Momotidae and Todidae, and Coraciidae and Brachypteraciidae, respectively, also form well supported monophyletic clades. The results are inconclusive regarding the monophyly of the orders Coraciiformes and Piciformes, respectively.

  • 310.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Pasquet, Eric
    Irestedt, Martin
    The New Zealand: Thrush: An extinct Oriole2011In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 9, article id e24317Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 311. Johnson, Shannon
    et al.
    Warén, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Tunnicliffe, Verena
    Van Dover, Cindy
    Wheat, C. Geoffrey
    Schultz, Thomas F.
    Vrijenhoek, Robert C.
    Molecular taxonomy and naming of five cryptic species of Alviniconcha snails (Gastropoda: Abyssochrysoidea) from hydrothermal vents2015In: Systematics and Biodiversity, ISSN 1477-2000, E-ISSN 1478-0933, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 278-295Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 312.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ylva
    Acoelomorpha2020In: Guide to the identification of Marine Meiofauna / [ed] Andreas Schmidt-Rhaesa, München: Ulf Jondelius , 2020, 1, p. 44-53Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 313.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Meyer-Wachsmuth, Inga
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hyper-cryptic marine meiofauna: species complexes in Nemertodermatida2014In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, article id e107688Article in journal (Refereed)
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    meyer-Wachsmuth & Jondelius 2014
  • 314.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Raikova, Olga
    Russian Academy of Sciences.
    Martinez, Pedro
    University of Barcelona.
    Xenacoelomorpha, a Key Group to Understand Bilaterian Evolution: Morphological and Molecular Perspectives.2019In: Evolution, Origin of Life, Concepts and Methods. / [ed] Pontarotti, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 287-315Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 315. Jonsell, Bengt
    et al.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The Linnaean Anders Sparrman as traveller and collector in South Africa2016In: Symbolae Botanicae Upsalienses, ISSN 0082-0644, Vol. 38, p. 75-80Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 316. Jonsell, Bengt
    et al.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The Linnean Anders Sparrman as traveller and collector in South Africa2016In: Symbolae Botanicae Upsalienses, ISSN 0082-0644, Vol. 38, p. 75-80Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 317. Jonsell, Mats
    et al.
    González Alonso, Clara
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    van Achterberg, Kees
    Komonen, Atte
    Structure of insect community in the fungus Inonotus radiatus in riparian boreal forests2016In: Journal of Natural History, ISSN 0022-2933, E-ISSN 1464-5262, Vol. 50, p. 1613-1631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Basidiomes of polypore fungi host many insects. Yet systematic information about insect assemblages from most fungal species is lacking. We studied the insect community associated with the wood-decaying fungus Inonotus radiatus (Sowerby: Fr.) P. Karst. (Hymenochaetales). More specifically, we studied the effect of successional stage and weight of basidiomes, as well as shore exposition (north or south), on species richness and composition, as well as occurrence and abundance of the most abundant fungivores. Basidiomes were collected from riparian forests at five lakes in Sweden. Insects were reared out from the basidiomes in the laboratory. A total of 5645 adult insect individuals of 117 taxa were obtained. Among these, 2782 specimens of 36 taxa use Inonotus radiatus basidiomes as breeding habitat. Eight species of parasitic wasps were new to Sweden. The most abundant fungi- vore was Ennearthron cornutum (Ciidae), which is a generalist breeding in many polypore species. Based on our material and literature, the melandryid beetles Abdera affinis and A. flexuosa seem to be specialists on the order Hymenochaetales. Other fre- quent fungivores were Dorcatoma dresdensis (Ptinidae), and the lepidopterans Archinemapogon yildizae, Nemapogon cloacellus and N. picarellus (Tineidae). The parasitoid community associated with the tineid moths was similar to the community associated with the other polypore species in the order Polyporales. In contrast, the parasitoids associated with Dorcatoma (and/or Abdera) were dif- ferent from the other Polyporales species, suggesting that the fungal host species is more important for these parasitoid species than the beetle host species itself. The most abundant and fre- quent parasitoids were the braconids Diospilus dispar and Colastes fritzeni, which both parasitise Dorcatoma. Species richness was significantly smaller in fresh than in more decayed basidiomes, but species composition did not differ. There was no difference in species composition or richness between north and south shorelines.

  • 318.
    Jonsell, Mats
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Stigenberg, Julia
    Saproxylic Hymenoptera in dead wood retained on clear cuts, relation to wood parameters and their degree of specialisation2023In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 347-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intensive forestry is a threat to biodiversity, and therefore actions are made to mitigate this loss. The actions are, however, designed based on available knowledge about the requirements of species, and for saproxylic insects this concerns mainly Coleoptera, while the diverse but poorly known Hymenoptera has contributed less. In this paper we therefore asked whether the substrate requirements of Hymenoptera (divided as parasitoids and non-parasitoids) are similar to those of Coleoptera and Diptera. We used an insect material reared from logging residue wood for the comparison. Theoretically parasitoid Hyme- noptera should be less specialised than Coleoptera and other host species as they belong to a higher trophic level. However, we found no such difference and even an opposite trend, that parasitoids were more specialised than beetles. Parasitoids had significantly more species in newly dead wood of fine diameter (1–4 cm, compared to coarse wood of 8–15 cm) compared to other groups. This is probably due to that many of them have bark beetles as hosts. The non-parasitoids were less specialised than the other groups and more confined to old wood (4–5 years), which is in line with that many of them are aculeate wasps building nests in emergence holes from other insects.

    Implications for insect conservation The habitat requirements of Hymenoptera suggest that the conservation actions designed for the well known groups are also applicable for them. The parasitoids’ association to trivial substrates (fine wood) sug- gest a good supply of breeding habitat, whereas their high specialisation in combination with higher trophic level suggest they contain an even higher proportion of threatened species than Coleoptera. How this is traded off needs further studies.

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  • 319.
    Jordan, Anna
    et al.
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park.
    Broad, Gavin
    Natural History Museum, London.
    Stigenberg, Julia
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hughes, Jessica
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park.
    Stone, Jane
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park.
    Bedford, Ian
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park.
    Penfield, Steven
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park.
    Wells, Rachel
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park.
    The potential of the solitary parasitoid Microctonus brassicae for the biological control of the adult cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala2020In: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, ISSN 0013-8703, E-ISSN 1570-7458, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cabbage stem flea beetle (CSFB), Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a major pest of oilseed rape, Brassica napus L. (Brassicaceae), within the UK and continental Europe. Following the withdrawal of many broad-spectrum pesticides, most importantly neonicotinoids, and with increased incidence of pyrethroid resistance, few chemical control options remain, resulting in the need for alternative pest management strategies. We identified the parasitoid wasp Microctonus brassicae (Haeselbarth) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) within CSFB collected from three independent sites in Norfolk, UK. Parasitism of adult CSFB was confirmed, and wasp oviposition behaviour was described. Moreover, we show that within captive colonies parasitism rates are sufficient to generate significant biological control of CSFB populations. A sequence of the M. brassicae mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (MT-CO1) gene was generated for rapid future identification. Moroccan specimens of Microctonus aethiopoides (Loan), possessing 90% sequence similarity, were the closest identified sequenced species. This study represents the first description published in English of this parasitoid of the adult cabbage stem flea beetle.

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  • 320. Jörger, Katharina
    et al.
    Alvaro, Nuno
    Andrade, Luiz
    Araujo, Thiago
    Aramayo, Victor
    Artois, Tom
    Ballentine, William
    Bergmeier, Franziska
    Botelho, Andrea
    Buckenmeyer, Ariane
    Capucho, Ana
    Cherenva, Irina
    Curini-Galletti, Marco
    Davison, Anitha
    Deng, Wang
    Di Domenico, Maikon
    Ellison, Christina
    Engelhardt, Jan
    Fais, Maria
    Fontaneto, Diego
    Frade, Duarte
    de Frias Martins, Antonio
    Goetz, Freya
    Hochberg, Rick
    de Jesus-Navarrete, Alberto
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ylva
    Luckas, Nina
    Martinez Garcia, Alejandro
    Mikhlina, Anna
    Neusser, Timea
    Norenburg, Jon
    Pardo, Juan
    Peixoto, Antonio
    Roberts, Nickellaus
    Savchenko, Alexandra
    Schmidt-Rhaesa, Andreas
    Tödter, Lenke
    Yap-Chiongco, Megan
    Ricardo Costa, Ana Cristina
    MEIOZORES 2019 - EXPLORING THE MARINE MEIOFAUNA OF THE AZORES2021In: AÇOREANA, p. 17-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In July 2019 an international team of 39 senior and junior researchers from nine

    countries met at the University of the Azores in Ponta Delgada, São Miguel for a 10-daysworkshop/ summer school to explore the meiofaunal biodiversity in marine sediments of the Azores. In total, we sampled intertidal and subtidal sediments from 54 localities on 14 major sites around São Miguel and additionally explored eight freshwater and terrestrial sites for rotifers. We sorted and investigated more than 2000 living specimens in the field, yielding approximately 180 species of soft-bodied meiofauna, representing most major clades of meiofauna with a focus on nematodes, polychaete annelids, proseriate andrhabdocoel flatworms, gastrotrichs, acoelomorphs, nemerteans, molluscs and cnidarians. Most of the encountered diversity shows similarities to the North-East Atlantic continental meiofauna, but in-depth morphological and molecular analyses are still pending. About 60 of the 180 species could not be assigned a species-level identification in the field, and nearly 15% of the total diversity is expected to be new to science and is awaiting formal description. Herein, we present an overview of the results of the workshop, providing detailed information on the sampling sites, methodology and encountered diversity, and we offer a preliminary discussion on aspects of faunal elements shared with other biogeographic regions. We highlight the most common members of the marine meiofauna of the Azores, provide preliminary diversity estimates and suggest a roadmap for future research towards a better understanding of the meiofauna in this remote archipelago.

  • 321. Jønsson, Knud Andreas
    et al.
    Delhey, Kaspar
    Sangster, George
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Correction to 'The evolution of mimicry of friarbirds by orioles (Aves: Passeriformes) in Australo-Pacific archipelagos'.2016In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 283, no 1837, article id 20161497Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 322. Jønsson, Knud Andreas
    et al.
    Delhey, Kaspar
    Sangster, George
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    The evolution of mimicry of friarbirds by orioles (Aves: Passeriformes) in Australo-Pacific archipelagos.2016In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 283, no 1833, article id 20160409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observations by Alfred Wallace and Jared Diamond of plumage similarities between co-occurring orioles (Oriolus) and friarbirds (Philemon) in the Malay archipelago led them to conclude that the former represent visual mimics of the latter. Here, we use molecular phylogenies and plumage reflectance measurements to test several key predictions of the mimicry hypothesis. We show that friarbirds originated before brown orioles, that the two groups did not co-speciate, although there is one plausible instance of co-speciation among species on the neighbouring Moluccan islands of Buru and Seram. Furthermore, we show that greater size disparity between model and mimic and a longer history of co-occurrence have resulted in a stronger plumage similarity (mimicry). This suggests that resemblance between orioles and friarbirds represents mimicry and that colonization of islands by brown orioles has been facilitated by their ability to mimic the aggressive friarbirds.

  • 323.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Extinctions, genetic erosion and conservation options for the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis)2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, article id 41417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The black rhinoceros is again on the verge of extinction due to unsustainable poaching in its nativerange. Despite a wide historic distribution, the black rhinoceros was traditionally thought of asdepauperate in genetic variation, and with very little known about its evolutionary history. Thisknowledge gap has hampered conservation efforts because hunting has dramatically reduced thespecies' once continuous distribution, leaving five surviving gene pools of unknown genetic affinity.Here we examined the range-wide genetic structure of historic and modern populations using thelargest and most geographically representative sample of black rhinoceroses ever assembled. Usingboth mitochondrial and nuclear datasets, we described a staggering loss of 69% of the species'mitochondrial genetic variation, including the most ancestral lineages that are now absent frommodern populations. Genetically unique populations in countries such as Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad,Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Mozambique, Malawi and Angola no longer exist. We found that the historicrange of the West African subspecies (D. b. longipes), declared extinct in 2011, extends into southernKenya, where a handful of individuals survive in the Masai Mara. We also identify conservation unitsthat will help maintain evolutionary potential. Our results suggest a complete re-evaluation of currentconservation management paradigms for the black rhinoceros.

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  • 324.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Feeding Ecology in Oligocene Mylodontoid Sloths (Mammalia,Xenarthra) as Revealed by Orthodentine Microwear Analysis2018In: Journal of mammalian evolution, ISSN 1064-7554, E-ISSN 1573-7055, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 551-564-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, dental microwear analysis has been successfully employed to xenarthran teeth. Here, we present new data on use wear features on 16 molariforms of Orophodon hapaloides and Octodontotherium grande. These taxa count among the earliest sloths and are known from the Deseadan SALMA (late Oligocene). Modern phylogenetic analyses classify Octodontotherium and Orophodon within Mylodontoidea with whom they share lobate cheek teeth with an outer layer of cementum and a thick layer of orthodentine. Similar target areas of 100 μm2 were analyzed on the orthodentine surface of each tooth by stereomicroscopic microwear and by SEM microwear. Results were unlike those of extant sloths (stereomicroscopic microwear: Bradypus, Choloepus) and published data from fossil sloths (SEM microwear: Acratocnus, Megalonyx, Megatherium, Thinobadistes); thus, both approaches independently indicate a different feeding ecology for the Oligocene taxa. The unique microwear results suggest that both taxa fed on plant material with low to moderate intrinsic toughness (foliage, twigs) but also proposes intake of tougher food items (e.g., seeds). Frequent gouging of the tooth surfaces can be explained by exogenous influence on microwear, such as possible intake of abrasive grit. We suggest an unspecialized herbivorous diet for Octodontotherium and Orophodon utilizing diverse food resources of their habitat. These interpretations support the reconstruction of (1) Deseadan environments as open habitats with spreading savannas/grasslands and (2) both taxa as wide muzzled bulk feeders at ground level.

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  • 325.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Modular Wear Facet Nomenclature for Mammalian post-canine dentitions2017In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381, Vol. 30, no 1-2, p. 30-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dental wear facets on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars are traces of their main function, themastication and therefore reflect masticatory movements and also paramasticatory (i.e. non-dietary useof teeth) behavior. Here we present the Modular Wear Facet Nomenclature applicable to most mammaliandentitions. Topographic positions of wear facets in relation to the major cusps and crests of the teeth areused to designate the areas of the occlusal surface the facets occupy (e.g. their mesial, distal, lingual, orbuccal position). Previous published systems for labeling wear facets have been inconsistent with eachother. Therefore, we provide a synoptic review of the most widely-used terminologies, and introducethe alternative Modular Wear Facet Nomenclature. This nomenclature aims to overcome the difficultiescaused by the existing inconsistent wear facet terminologies. Our new approach is applicable to dentitionswhere the occlusal morphology does not change significantly for most of the lifetime of the animal. Inthose dentitions, the primary occlusal surfaces are not significantly modified as wear facets become moreextensive with wearing. This appears to be a common pattern in pre-tribosphenic, tribosphenic molars,and the teeth derived from tribosphenic precursors (e.g. bunodont molar morphologies). In teeth wherethe secondary occlusal surface is functionally intensely modified (i.e. high-crowned and evergrowingteeth with large areas of dentine exposed) any facet labeling system appears to be challenging, since theidentification of individual facets is blurred and their spatial position may be indeterminable.

  • 326.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Short review of dental microstructure and dental microwear in xenarthran teeth2020In: Mammalian Teeth – Form and Function / [ed] Thomas Martin and Wighart von Koenigswald, München: Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil , 2020, 1, p. 231-241Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no abstract.

  • 327.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Fejfar, Oldrich
    Geological‐Paleontological Institute Karls University Prague Czech Republic.
    Kimura, Yuri
    Department of Geology and Paleontology National Museum of Nature and Science Tsukuba Japan;Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona Barcelona Spain.
    Bailey, Bruce E.
    Division of Vertebrate Paleontology University of Nebraska State Museum Lincoln Nebraska USA.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Paleobiology Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Incisor enamel microstructure places New and Old World Eomyidae outside Geomorpha (Rodentia, Mammalia)2022In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 381-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lower incisor enamel microstructure of the fossil rodent family Eomyidae was believed to be three-layered and highly derived but rather uniform throughout the clade. Here, we describe a new four-layered schmelzmuster in Eomyidae consisting of a three-fold portio interna with longitudinal oriented, uniserial Hunter-Schreger bands and a one-fold portio externa, accounting for a unique enamel microstructure character combination in Rodentia. This new schmelzmuster type has developed early in eomyid evolution and is detectable already in the late Eocene (Chadronian) of North America. In European eomyids, it first occurs in the early Miocene (MN 3), implying that this four-layered schmelzmuster was not present in all members of the family but restricted to species included in Eomyini and some genera currently considered Eomyidae incertae sedis within Eomyidae. Additionally, our analysis recognizes three taxa with schmelzmuster divergent from all other eomyids. Incisor enamel microstructure does not advocate a close phylogenetic relationship of Eomyidae to either fossil or extant Heteromyidae and Geomyidae, nor to fossil Heliscomyidae and Florentiamyidae. Our results rather support the view that Eomyidae are placed outside Geomorpha.

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  • 328.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Biomechanical adaptations for burrowing in the incisor enamel microstructure of Geomyidae and Heteromyidae (Rodentia: Geomyoidea)2021In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 11, p. 9447-9459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The enamel microstructure of fossil and extant Geomyoidea (Geomyidae, Heteromyidae) lower incisors incorporates three- or two-layered schmelzmusters with uniserial, transverse Hunter-Schreger bands having parallel and perpendicular or exclusively perpendicular oriented interprismatic matrix. Phylogenetically, these schmelzmusters are regarded as moderately (enamel type 2) to highly derived (enamel type 3). Our analysis detected a zone of modified radial enamel close to the enamel–dentine junction. Modified radial enamel shows a strong phylogenetic signal within the clade Geomorpha as it is restricted to fossil and extant Geomyoidea and absent in Heliscomyidae, Florentiamyidae, and Eomyidae. This character dates back to at least the early Oligocene (early Arikareean, 29 Ma), where it occurs in entoptychine gophers. We contend that this specialized incisor enamel architecture developed as a biomechanical adaptation to regular burrowing activities including chisel-tooth digging and a fiber-rich diet and was probably present in the common ancestor of the clade. We regard the occurrence of modified radial enamel in lower incisors of scratch-digging Geomyidae and Heteromyidae as the retention of a plesiomorphic character that is selectively neutral. The shared occurrence of modified radial enamel is a strong, genetically anchored argument for the close phylogenetic relationship of Geomyidae and Heteromyidae on the dental microstructure level.

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  • 329.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Lindsay, Everett H.
    Koenigswald, Wighart von
    Paciculus walshi, new species, (Rodentia, Cricetidae), the origin of Cricetidae and an Oligocene intercontinental mammal dispersal event2016In: Historical Biology, Vol. 28, p. 78-94Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 330.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    O'Connor, Patrick M.
    Ohio Center for Ecology and Evolutionary Studies, Athens, Ohio, USA.
    Roberts, Eric M.
    James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.
    A new mammal from the Turonian–Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) Galula Formation, southwestern Tanzania2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 65-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We here establish a newmammaliaform genus and species, Galulatheriumjenkinsi (Mammalia), from the UpperCretaceous Galula Formation in the Rukwa Rift Basin of southwestern Tanzania. Thisrepresents the first named taxon of a mammaliaform from the entire Late Cretaceous,an interval of 34 million years, of continental Afro-Africa. Preliminary studyof the holotype (a partial dentary) resulted in tentative assignation to the Gondwanatheria,a poorly known, enigmatic clade of Late Cretaceous–Paleogene Gondwanan mammals (Krauseet al. 2003). The application of advanced imaging (µCT) and visualizationtechniques permits a more detailed understanding of key anatomical features of thenew taxon. CT analysis reveals that the lower dentition consisted of a large,procumbent lower incisor and four cheek teeth, all which are ever growing(hypselodont). Importantly, all of the teeth appear to have been devoid ofenamel during life. Comparisons conducted with a range of Mesozoic and selectedCenozoic mammaliaform groups demonstrates that a number of features (e.g.,enamel-less and ever-growing teeth, columnar cheek teeth with relatively simpleocclusal morphology) expressed in Galulatheriumare reminiscent of disparate groups, making taxonomic assignment difficult. Hereinwe retain the provisional referral of Galulatherium(RRBP 02067) to Gondwanatheria; it is most similar to sudamericids such as Lavanify and Bharratherium from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar and India,respectively, which exhibit relatively simple, high-crowned, columnar cheek teeth.Other features (e.g., enamel-less dentition) shared with disparate forms suchas the Late Jurassic Fruitafossor andvarious xenarthrans (e.g., sloths) are attributed to convergence. Detailed analysesof the depositional context for the type and only specimen place it as havinglived sometime between the late Turonian and latest Campanian (roughly 91–72million years ago). This enhanced geochronological context helps to refine thepalaeobiogeographical significance of Galulatheriumamong Cretaceous mammals in general and those of Gondwanan landmassesspecifically.

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  • 331.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Schulz-Kornas, Ellen
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.
    Corfe, Ian
    University of Helsinki.
    Martin, Thomas
    Universität Bonn.
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Schultz, Julia A.
    Universität Bonn.
    Complementary approaches to tooth wear analysisin Tritylodontidae (Synapsida, Mammaliamorpha)reveal a generalist diet.2019In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 1-24, article id e0220188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stereoscopic microwear and 3D surface texture analyses on the cheek teeth of ten Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous tritylodontid (Mammaliamorpha) taxa of small/medium to large body size suggest that all were generalist feeders and none was a dietary specialist adapted to herbivory. There was no correspondence between body size and food choice. Stereomicroscopic microwear analysis revealed predominantly fine wear features with numerous small pits and less abundant fine scratches as principal components. Almost all analyzed facets bear some coarser microwear features, such as coarse scratches, large pits, puncture pits and gouges pointing to episodic feeding on harder food items or exogenous effects (contamination of food with soil grit and/or dust), or both. 3D surface texture analysis indicates predominantly fine features with large void volume, low peak densities, and various stages of roundness of the peaks. We interpret these features to indicate consumption of food items with low to moderate intrinsic abrasiveness and can exclude regular rooting, digging or caching behavior. Possible food items include plant vegetative parts, plant reproductive structures (seeds and seed-bearing organs), and invertebrates (i.e., insects). Although the tritylodontid tooth morphology and auto-occlusion suggest plants as the primary food resource, our results imply a wider dietary range including animal matter.

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  • 332.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Trocheri, M.W.
    Jungers, W.L.
    The evolutionary origin and population history of the grauer gorilla2016In: Yearbook of Physical Anthropology, Vol. 159, p. S4-S18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 333. Kano, Yasunori
    et al.
    Takano, Tsuyoshi
    Schwabe, E.
    Warén, A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Phylogenetic position and systematics of the wood-associate limpet genus Caymanabyssia and implications for ecological radiation into deep-sea organic substrates by lepetelloid gastropods.2016In: Marine ecology, ISSN ISSN 0173-9565, Vol. 37, p. 1116-1130Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 334. Karlsson, Dave
    et al.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holston, Kevin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    The data of the Swedish Malaise Trap Project, a countrywide inventory of Sweden's insect fauna2020In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 8, article id e56286Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 335. Karlsson, Dave
    et al.
    Hartop, Emily
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jaschhof, Mathias
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The Swedish Malaise Trap Project: a 15 year retrospective on a countrywide inventory.2020In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 8, article id e47255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Malaise Trap Project (SMTP) is one of the most ambitious insect inventories ever attempted. The project was designed to target poorly known insect groups across a diverse range of habitats in Sweden. The field campaign involved the deployment of 73 Malaise traps at 55 localities across the country for three years (2003-2006). Over the past 15 years, the collected material has been hand sorted by trained technicians into over 300 taxonomic fractions suitable for expert attention. The resulting collection is a tremendous asset for entomologists around the world, especially as we now face a desperate need for baseline data to evaluate phenomena like insect decline and climate change. Here, we describe the history, organisation, methodology and logistics of the SMTP, focusing on the rationale for the decisions taken and the lessons learned along the way. The SMTP represents one of the early instances of community science applied to large-scale inventory work, with a heavy reliance on volunteers in both the field and the laboratory. We give estimates of both staff effort and volunteer effort involved. The project has been funded by the Swedish Taxonomy Initiative; in total, the inventory has cost less than 30 million SEK (approximately 3.1 million USD). Based on a subset of the samples, we characterise the size and taxonomic composition of the SMTP material. Several different extrapolation methods suggest that the material comprises around 20 million specimens in total. The material is dominated by Diptera (75% of the specimens) and Hymenoptera (15% of specimens). Amongst the Diptera, the dominant groups are Chironomidae (37% of specimens), Sciaridae (15%), Phoridae (13%), Cecidomyiidae (9.5%) and Mycetophilidae (9.4%). Within Hymenoptera, the major groups are Ichneumonidae (44% of specimens), Diaprioidea (19%), Braconidae (9.6%), Platygastroidea (8.5%) and Chalcidoidea (7.9%). The taxonomic composition varies with latitude and season. Several Diptera and Hymenoptera groups are more common in non-summer samples (collected from September to April) and in the North, while others show the opposite pattern. About 1% of the total material has been processed and identified by experts so far. This material represents over 4,000 species. One third of these had not been recorded from Sweden before and almost 700 of them are new to science. These results reveal the large amounts of taxonomic work still needed on Palaearctic insect faunas. Based on the SMTP experiences, we discuss aspects of planning and conducting future large-scale insect inventory projects using mainly traditional approaches in relation to more recent approaches that rely on molecular techniques.

  • 336. Karlsson Green, Kristina
    et al.
    Svensson, Erik
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Härdling, Roger
    Hansson, Bengt
    The interplay between local ecology, divergent selection and genetic drift in population divergence of a sexually antagonistic female trait2014In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 68, no 7, p. 1934-1946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetically polymorphic species offer the possibility to study maintenance of genetic variation and the potential role for genetic drift in population divergence. Indirect inference of the selection regimes operating on polymorphic traits can be achieved by comparing population divergence in neutral genetic markers with population divergence in trait frequencies. Such an approach could further be combined with ecological data to better understand agents of selection. Here, we infer the selective regimes acting on a polymorphic mating trait in an insect group; the dorsal structures (either rough or smooth) of female diving beetles. Our recent work suggests that the rough structures have a sexually antagonistic function in reducing male mating attempts. For two species (Dytiscus lapponicus andGraphoderus zonatus), we could not reject genetic drift as an explanation for population divergence in morph frequencies, whereas for the third (Hygrotus impressopunctatus) we found that divergent selection pulls morph frequencies apart across populations. Furthermore, population morph frequencies in H. impressopunctatus were significantly related to local bioclimatic factors, providing an additional line of evidence for local adaptation in this species. These data, therefore, suggest that local ecological factors and sexual conflict interact over larger spatial scales to shape population divergence in the polymorphism.

  • 337.
    Kersten, Oliver
    et al.
    Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Star, Bastiaan
    Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Krabberød, Anders K.
    Section for Genetics and Evolutionary Biology (Evogene), Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Atmore, Lane M.
    Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Tørresen, Ole K.
    Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Anker-Nilssen, Tycho
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Trondheim, Norway..
    Descamps, Sébastien
    Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, Langnes, Tromsø, Norway..
    Strøm, Hallvard
    Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, Langnes, Tromsø, Norway..
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sweet, Paul R.
    American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, USA..
    Jakobsen, Kjetill S.
    Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Boessenkool, Sanne
    Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Hybridization of Atlantic puffins in the Arctic coincides with 20th-century climate change2023In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 9, no 40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 338. Khodami, Sahar
    et al.
    Martinez Arbizu, Pedro
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Laakman, Silke
    Molecular species delimitation of Icelandic brittle stars (Ophiuroidea)2014In: Polish Polar Research, ISSN 0138-0338, E-ISSN 2081-8262, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 243-260Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 339.
    KIMURA, Yuri
    et al.
    Department of Geology and Paleontology, National Museum of Nature and Science.
    CASANOVAS-VILAR, Isaac
    Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, ICTA-ICP.
    MARIDET, OLIVIER
    JURASSICA Museum, Route de Fontenais 21, CH-2900 Porrentruy, Switzerland.
    KALTHOFF, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    TOMIDA, Yukimitsu
    The Eomyidae in Asia: Biogeography, diversity and dispersals2020In: Fossil Imprint, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 181-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Asia, the first find of an eomyid rodent was reported almost one century after the first studies of the family Eomyidae in North America and Europe. Since then, eomyid rodents have been increasingly found in Asia particularly over the past two decades. Here, we review the Asian record of this family at the genus level. Currently, 22 species within 14 genera were reported from Asia, including seven endemic genera and rare materials of apeomyine eomyids. Eomyids emphasize the palaeogeographic importance of Asia in considering intercontinental dispersal events of small mammals. With newly compiled data for Asian eomyids, we also compare genus-level diversity trends through time among North America, Europe, and Asia. Despite data standardizations limited with respect to potential biases in the fossil record, we found that the Asian eomyid diversity closely follows ecological shifts induced by climate changes. In general, Asian eomyid genera disappeared earlier than their European counterparts. We suggest that this pattern is not dictated by differences in the quality of the fossil record and is related to the expansion of drier habitats over large areas of Asia.

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  • 340. KIMURA, Yuri
    et al.
    TOMIDA, Yukimitsu
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    CASANOVAS-VILAR, Isaac
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A new endemic genus of eomyid rodents from the early Miocene of Japan2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 341.
    Klopfstein, Seraina
    et al.
    Naturhistorisches Museum Basel, Augustinergasse 2, CH-4001 Basel, Switzerland.
    Broad, Gavin
    Department of Life Sciences, the Natural History Museum, (London, United Kingdom).
    Urfer, Karin
    Naturmuseum St. Gallen, Rorschacher Strasse 263, CH-9016 St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Haraldseide, Harald
    Ålavikvegen 4, 4250 Kopervik, Norway..
    An interactive key to the European genera of Campopleginae (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae) and 20 new species for Sweden2022In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 143, p. 121-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Darwin wasps of the subfamily Campopleginae are among the most poorly studied insect groups, which is to a large part due to inadequate identification tools. The currently 835 European species are classified into 42 genera, some of a somewhat unclear delimitation, and are very hard to identify using the incomplete, scattered and often poorly illustrated literature. We here assess different character systems for genus identification and provide an interactive, dynamic online key to the European genera. We apply this key to identify 3,500 specimens of the Swedish Malaise Trap Project to genus level. We then chose ten comparatively small genera for species-level identification, reporting a total of 37 species, 20 of which are new records for Sweden. The large number of species only found in a single trap location indicates that a lot remains to be discovered, even in an otherwise well-known fauna such as Sweden’s.

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  • 342.
    Kocot, Kevin
    et al.
    University of Alabama.
    Struck, Torsten
    Natural History Museum, Department of Research and Collections, University of Oslo.
    Merkel, Julia
    Johannes Gutenberg University.
    Waits, Damien
    Auburn University.
    Todt, Christiane
    University Museum of Bergen.
    Brannock, Pamela
    Auburn University.
    Weese, David
    Auburn University.
    Cannon, Johanna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Auburn University.
    Moroz, Leonid
    The Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience.
    Lieb, Bernhard
    Johannes Gutenberg University.
    Halanych, Kenneth
    Auburn University.
    Phylogenomics of Lophotrochozoa with consideration of systematic error2017In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 256-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenomic studies have improved understanding of deep metazoan phylogeny and show promise for resolving incongruences among analyses based on limited numbers of loci. One region of the animal tree that has been especially difficult to resolve, even with phylogenomic approaches, is relationships within Lophotrochozoa (the animal clade that includes molluscs, annelids, and flatworms among others). Lack of resolution in phylogenomic analyses could be due to insufficient phylogenetic signal, limitations in taxon and/or gene sampling, or systematic error. Here, we investigated why lophotrochozoan phylogeny has been such a difficult question to answer by identifying and reducing sources of systematic error. We supplemented existing data with 32 new transcriptomes spanning the diversity of Lophotrochozoa and constructed a new set of Lophotrochozoa-specific core orthologs. Of these, 638 orthologous groups (OGs) passed strict screening for paralogy using a tree-based approach. In order to reduce possible sources of systematic error, we calculated branch-length heterogeneity, evolutionary rate, percent missing data, compositional bias, and saturation for each OG and analyzed increasingly stricter subsets of only the most stringent (best) OGs for these five variables. Principal component analysis of the values for each factor examined for each OG revealed that compositional heterogeneity and average patristic distance contributed most to the variance observed along the first principal component while branch-length heterogeneity and, to a lesser extent, saturation contributed most to the variance observed along the second. Missing data did not strongly contribute to either. Additional sensitivity analyses examined effects of removing taxa with heterogeneous branch lengths, large amounts of missing data, and compositional heterogeneity. Although our analyses do not unambiguously resolve lophotrochozoan phylogeny, we advance the field by reducing the list of viable hypotheses. Moreover, our systematic approach for dissection of phylogenomic data can be applied to explore sources of incongruence and poor support in any phylogenomic dataset. 

  • 343.
    Kolicka, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Department of Animal Taxonomy and Ecology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Umultowska 89, 61–614 Poznan, Poland.
    Dabert, Miroslawa
    Molecular Biology Techniques Laboratory, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Umultowska 89, 61–614 Poznań, Poland. .
    Dabert, Jacek
    Department of Animal Morphology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Umultowska 89, 61–614 Poznań, Poland..
    Kånneby, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kisielewski, Jacek
    Department of Animal Taxonomy and Ecology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Umultowska 89, 61–614 Poznan, Poland. .
    Bifidochaetus, a new Arctic genus of freshwater Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha) from Spitsbergen revealed by an integrative taxonomic approach2016In: Invertebrate systematics, ISSN 1445-5226, E-ISSN 1447-2600, ISSN 1445-5226, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 398-419, article id IS16001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastrotricha is a cosmopolitan phylum of aquatic and semi-terrestrial invertebrates that comprises ~820 described species. To date, freshwater gastrotrichs have not been the subject of faunistic or taxonomic research in the polar regions. In this paper, we present the first species-level description of a freshwater gastrotrich from the Arctic (Svalbard Archipelago). Evidence from morphology, morphometry and molecular analyses reveals that the species represents a new genus in Chaetonotidae: Bifidochaetus arcticus, gen. et sp. nov. Taking into consideration many morphological similarities to Chaetonotus (Primochaetus) veronicae Kånneby, 2013 we propose to include C. (P.) veronicae in the newly established genus under the new combination Bifidochaetus veronicae (Kånneby, 2013), comb. nov. In the phylogenetic analysis based on nuclear 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I sequence data, B. arcticus, gen. et sp. nov. is nested within the family Chaetonotidae, as the sister group to the genus Lepidochaetus Kisielewski, 1991. In this paper we also present new taxonomic characters useful for gastrotrich taxonomy: the pharynx-to-intestine length ratio (I) and the spine bifurcation ratio (B).

  • 344.
    Košuthová, Alica
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Westberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Species delimitation in the cyanolichen genus Rostania2020In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In this study, we investigate species limits in the cyanobacterial lichen genus Rostania (Collemataceae, Peltigerales, Lecanoromycetes). Four molecular markers (mtSSU rDNA, β-tubulin, MCM7, RPB2) were sequenced and analysed with two coalescent-based species delimitation methods: the Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC) and a Bayesian species delimitation method (BPP) using a multispecies coalescence model (MSC), the latter with or without an a priori defined guide tree.

    Results

    Species delimitation analyses indicate the presence of eight strongly supported candidate species. Conclusive correlation between morphological/ecological characters and genetic delimitation could be found for six of these. Of the two additional candidate species, one is represented by a single sterile specimen and the other currently lacks morphological or ecological supporting evidence.

    Conclusions

    We conclude that Rostania includes a minimum of six species: R. ceraniscaR. multipunctataR. occultata 1, R. occultata 2, R. occultata 3, and R. occultata 4,5,6. Three distinct Nostoc morphotypes occur in Rostania, and there is substantial correlation between these morphotypes and Rostania thallus morphology.

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  • 345.
    Krainer, Liubomyr
    et al.
    State Museum of Natural History, NASU, Theatralna str. 18, Lviv 79008, Ukraine.
    Susulovsky, Andrij
    State Museum of Natural History, NASU, Theatralna str. 18, Lviv 79008, Ukraine.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Reyes, Peña-Santiago
    Departamento de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal y Ecologia, Universidad de Jaén, Campus 'Las Gunillas', Avenida de Ben Saprut s/n, 23071 Jaén, Spain.
    The genus Metaporcelaimus Lordello, 1965 (Nematoda, Dorylaimida, Aporcelaimidae) in Ukraine. Description of one new and one known species with granulate egg shell2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4560, no 1, p. 85-94Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 346. KROH, ANDREAS
    et al.
    MOOI, RICH
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    <p><strong>On the spelling of <em>Antrechinus nordenskjoldi </em>(Echinodermata: Echinoidea)*</strong></p>2012In: Zoosymposia, ISSN 1178-9905, E-ISSN 1178-9913, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 241-245Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 347.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A new species in the Pardosa lugubris group from Central Europe (Arachnida, Araneae, Lycosidae)1999In: Spixiana, ISSN 0341-8391, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 348.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A new species of wolf spider from the Pyrenees, with remarks on other species in the Pardosa pullata-group (Araneae, Lycosidae)2007In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 1650, p. 25-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 349.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A new species of wolf spider from the Pyrenees, with remarks on other species in the Pardosa pullata-group (Araneae, Lycosidae)2007In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 1650, p. 25-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 350.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A Presumptive Pheromone-Emitting Structure in Wolf Spiders (Araneae, Lycosidae)1986In: Psyche: A Journal of Entomology, ISSN 0033-2615, E-ISSN 1687-7438, Vol. 93, no 1-2, p. 127-131Article in journal (Refereed)
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