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  • 51. Borges, Rodrigo Lopes
    et al.
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain G.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Roque, Nádia
    Rydin, Catarina
    Phylogeny of the Neotropical element of the Randia clade (Gardenieae, Rubiaceae, Gentianales)2021In: Plant Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2032-3913, E-ISSN 2032-3921, Vol. 154, no 3, p. 458-469Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52. Braga, Mariana P.
    et al.
    Landis, Michael J.
    Nylin, Sören
    Janz, Niklas
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Bayesian Inference of Ancestral Host–Parasite Interactions under a Phylogenetic Model of Host Repertoire Evolution2020In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 69, p. 1149-1162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Britzke, Ricardo
    et al.
    Universidade Estadual Paulista.
    Oliveira, Claudio
    Universidade Estadual Paulista.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Apistogramma ortegai (Teleostei: Cichlidae), a new species of cichlid fish from the Ampyiacu River in the Peruvian Amazon basin2014In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3869, no 4, p. 409-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apistogramma ortegai, new species, is described from small streams tributaries of the Ampiyacu River near Pebas, in easternPeru. It belongs to the Apistogramma regani species group and is distinguished from all other species of Apistogrammaby the combination of contiguous caudal spot to bar 7, presence of abdominal stripes, short dorsal-fin lappets in both sexes,absence of vertical stripes on the caudal fin, and reduced number of predorsal and prepelvic scales.

  • 54. Buchbender, Volker
    et al.
    Hespanhol, Helena
    Krug, Michael
    Sérgio, Cecília
    Séneca, Ana
    Maul, Karola
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Quandt, Dietmar
    Phylogenetic reconstructions of the Hedwigiaceae reveal cryptic speciation and hybridisation in Hedwigia2014In: Bryophyte Diversity and Evolution, ISSN 2381-9677, Vol. 36, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Bukontaite, Rasa
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    Miller, Kelly
    University of New Mexico.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The utility of CAD in recovering Gondwanan vicariance events and the evolutionary history of Aciliini (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae).2014In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Aciliini presently includes 69 species of medium-sized water beetles distributed on all continents except Antarctica. The pattern of distribution with several genera confined to different continents of the Southern Hemisphere raises the yet untested hypothesis of a Gondwana vicariance origin. The monophyly of Aciliini has been questioned with regard to Eretini, and there are competing hypotheses about the intergeneric relationship in the tribe. This study is the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis focused on the tribe Aciliini and it is based on eight gene fragments. The aims of the present study are: 1) to test the monophyly of Aciliini and clarify the position of the tribe Eretini and to resolve the relationship among genera within Aciliini, 2) to calibrate the divergence times within Aciliini and test different biogeographical scenarios, and 3) to evaluate the utility of the gene CAD for phylogenetic analysis in Dytiscidae.

    Results

    Our analyses confirm monophyly of Aciliini with Eretini as its sister group. Each of six genera which have multiple species are also supported as monophyletic. The origin of the tribe is firmly based in the Southern Hemisphere with the arrangement of Neotropical and Afrotropical taxa as the most basal clades suggesting a Gondwana vicariance origin. However, the uncertainty as to whether a fossil can be used as a stem-or crowngroup calibration point for Acilius influenced the result: as crowngroup calibration, the 95% HPD interval for the basal nodes included the geological age estimate for the Gondwana break-up, but as a stem group calibration the basal nodes were too young. Our study suggests CAD to be the most informative marker between 15 and 50 Ma. Notably, the 2000 bp CAD fragment analyzed alone fully resolved the tree with high support.

    Conclusions

    1) Molecular data confirmed Aciliini as a monophyletic group. 2) Bayesian optimizations of the biogeographical history are consistent with an influence of Gondwana break-up history, but were dependent on the calibration method. 3) The evaluation using a method of phylogenetic signal per base pair indicated Wnt and CAD as the most informative of our sampled genes.

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    Bukontaite_etal_2014_BMC_Evol_Biol
  • 56. Büdel, B.
    et al.
    Colesie, C.
    Green, T.G.A.
    Grube, Martin
    Lázaro Suau, R.
    Loewen-Schneider, K.
    Maier, S.
    Peer, T.
    Pintado, A.
    Raggio, J.
    Ruprecht, U.
    Sancho, L. G.
    Schroeter, B.
    Türk, R.
    Weber, B.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Williams, L.
    Zheng, L.
    Improved appreciation of the functioning and importance of biological soil crusts in Europe – the Soil Crust International project (SCIN)2014In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710, Vol. 23, p. 1639-1658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 57. Cai, T L
    et al.
    Cibois, Alice
    Alström, Per
    Moyle, R G
    Kennedy, J D
    Shao, S M
    Zhang, R Y
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Gelang, Magnus
    Qu, Yanhua
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.
    Lei, Fumin
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Near-complete phylogeny and taxonomic revision of the world’s babblers (Aves: Passeriformes)2019In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 130, p. 346-356Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Cannon, Johanna
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Auburn University.
    Kocot, Kevin
    University of Queensland.
    Waits, Damien
    Auburn University.
    Weese, David
    Georgia College and State University.
    Swalla, Billie
    University of Washington.
    Santos, Scott
    Auburn University.
    Halanych, Kenneth
    Auburn University.
    Phylogenomic Resolution of the Hemichordate and Echinoderm Clade2014In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 24, p. 2827-2832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ambulacraria, comprising Hemichordata and Echinodermata, is closely related to Chordata, making it integral to understanding chordate origins and polarizing chordate molecular and morphological characters. Unfortunately, relationships within Hemichordata and Echinoder- mata have remained unresolved, compromising our ability to extrapolate findings from the most closely related molecular and developmental models outside of Chordata (e.g., the acorn worms Saccoglossus kowalevskii and Ptychodera flava and the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). To resolve long-standing phylogenetic issues within Ambulacraria, we sequenced transcriptomes for 14 hemichordates as well as 8 echinoderms and complemented these with existing data for a total of 33 ambulacrarian operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Examination of leaf stability values revealed rhabdopleurid pterobranchs and the enteropneust Stereobalanus canadensis were unstable in placement; therefore, analyses were also run without these taxa. Analyses of 185 genes resulted in reciprocal monophyly of Enteropneusta and Pterobranchia, placed the deep-sea family Torquaratoridae within Ptychoderidae, and confirmed the position of ophiuroid brittle stars as sister to asteroid sea stars (the Asterozoa hypothesis). These results are consistent with earlier perspectives concerning plesiomorphies of Ambulacraria, including pharyngeal gill slits, a single axocoel, and paired hydrocoels and somatocoels. The resolved ambulacrarian phylogeny will help clarify the early evolution of chordate characteristics and has implications for our understanding of major fossil groups, including graptolites and somasteroideans. 

  • 59.
    Cannon, P.
    et al.
    y, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK.
    Aptroot, A.
    ABL Herbarium, Netherlands.
    Coppins, B.
    Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, UK.
    Simkin, J.
    Newcastle University, UK.
    Otálora, M.
    ETH Zürich, Switzerland.
    Košuthová, Alica
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Revisions of British and Irish Lichens vol. 3 - Peltigerales: Collemataceae (including the genera Blennothallia, Callome, Collema, Enchylium, Epiphloea, Lathagrium, Leptogium, Pseudoleptogium, Rostania and Scytinium.2020Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Revisions of British and Irish Lichens is a free-to-access serial publication under the auspices of the British Lichen Society, that charts changes in our understanding of the lichens and lichenicolous fungi of Great Britain and Ireland. Each volume will be devoted to a particular family (or group of families), and will include descriptions, keys, habitat and distribution data for all the species included. The maps are based on information from the BLS Lichen Database, that also includes data from the historical Mapping Scheme and the Lichen Ireland database. The choice of subject for each volume will depend on the extent of changes in classification for the families concerned, and the number of newly recognized species since previous treatments. To date, accounts of lichens from our region have been published in book form. However, the time taken to compile new printed editions of the entire lichen biota of Britain and Ireland is extensive, and many parts are out-of-date even as they are published. Issuing updates as a serial electronic publication means that important changes in understanding of our lichens can be made available with a shorter delay. The accounts may also be compiled at intervals into complete printed accounts, as new editions of the Lichens of Great Britain and Ireland.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 60. Cannon, P.
    et al.
    Fryday, A.
    Svensson, M.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Aptroot, A.
    Coppins, B
    Orange, A.
    Sanderson, N.
    Simkin, J
    Lecanorales: Sphaerophoraceae, including the genera Bunodophoron, Gilbertaria and Sphaerophorus.2022Other (Refereed)
  • 61. Cappellini, Enrico
    et al.
    Gentry, Anthea
    Palkopoulou, Eleftheria
    Ishida, Yasuko
    Cram, David
    Roos, Anna-Marie
    Watson, Mick
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Fernholm, Bo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Agnelli, Paolo
    Barbagli, Fausto
    Littlewood, D. Tim. J.
    Kelstrup, Christian D.
    Olsen, Jesper V.
    Lister, Adrian M.
    Roca, Alfred L.
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Resolution of the type material of the Asian elephant, Elephas maximus Linnaeus, 1758 (Proboscidea, Elephantidae)2014In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 170, p. 222-232Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Cheng, Yalin
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;;College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;.
    Miller, Matthew J.
    Conservation Genetics Division, Reneco International Wildlife Consultants LLC, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates;;University of Alaska Museum, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775;.
    Zhang, Dezhi
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;.
    Xiong, Ying
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;;College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;.
    Hao, Yan
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;;College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;.
    Jia, Chenxi
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;.
    Cai, Tianlong
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;;College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;.
    Li, Shou-Hsien
    Department of Life Sciences, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan, China;.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Liu, Yang
    State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Department of Ecology/School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China;.
    Chang, Yongbin
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;;College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;.
    Song, Gang
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;.
    Lei, Fumin
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;;College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;;Center for Excellence in Animal Evolution and Genetics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650201, China.
    Parallel genomic responses to historical climate change and high elevation in East Asian songbirds2021In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 118, no 50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 63. Cibois, Alice
    et al.
    Gelang, Magnus
    Alström, Per
    Pasquet, Eric
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Olsson, Urban
    Comprehensive phylogeny of the laughingthrushes and allies (Aves, Leiothrichidae), and a proposal for a revised taxonomy2018In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 47, p. 428-440Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 64. Cibois, Alice
    et al.
    Vallotton, L
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Blom, Mozes P.K.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Genetic and radiographic insights into the only known mounted specimen of Kangaroo Island Emu2020In: Revue suisse de zoologie, ISSN 0035-418X, Vol. 126, p. 209-217Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 65. Cometto, Agnese
    et al.
    Leavitt, Steven D.
    Millanes, Ana M.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Grube, Martin
    Muggia, Lucia
    The yeast lichenosphere: high diversity of basidiomycetes from the lichens Tephromela atra and Rhizoplaca melanophthalma2022In: Fungal Biology, ISSN 1878-6146, E-ISSN 1878-6162, Vol. 126, no 9, p. 587-608Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66. Costa Baião, Guilherme
    Revision of the West Palaearctic species of Rhoptromeris Förster, 1869 (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae)2018In: Journal of Natural History, ISSN 0022-2933, E-ISSN 1464-5262, Vol. 52, p. 1201-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The West Palearctic species of Rhoptromeris are revised. A total of 11 species are recognised as valid in this region, including four newly described species: Rhoptromeris dichromata sp. nov., Rhoptromeris koponeni sp. nov., Rhoptromeris leptocornis sp. nov. and Rhoptromeris macaronesiensis sp. nov. Eucoila luteicornis Ionescu, 1959 is synonymised with Rhoptromeris heptoma (Hartig, 1840) syn. nov. A checklist of the Holarctic Rhoptromeris is presented and an identification key to the West Palearctic species is provided.

  • 67. Crous, P.W.
    et al.
    Lombard, L.
    Sandoval-Denis, M.
    Seifert, K.A.
    Schroers, H.-J.
    Chaverri, P.
    Gené, J.
    Guarro, J.
    Hirooka, Y.
    Bensch, K.
    Kema, G.H.J.
    Lamprecht, S.C.
    Cai, L.
    Rossman, A.Y.
    Stadler, M.
    Summerbell, R.C.
    Taylor, J.W.
    Ploch, S.
    Visagie, C.M.
    Yilmaz, N.
    Frisvad, J.C.
    Abdel-Azeem, A.M.
    Abdollahzadeh, J.
    Abdolrasouli, A.
    Akulov, A.
    Alberts, J.F.
    Araújo, J.P.M.
    Ariyawansa, H.A.
    Bakhshi, M.
    Bendiksby, M.
    Ben Hadj Amor, A.
    Bezerra, J.D.P.
    Boekhout, T.
    Câmara, M.P.S.
    Carbia, M.
    Cardinali, G.
    Castañeda-Ruiz, R.F.
    Celis, A.
    Chaturvedi, V.
    Collemare, J.
    Croll, D.
    Damm, U.
    Decock, C.A.
    de Vries, R.P.
    Ezekiel, C.N.
    Fan, X.L.
    Fernández, N.B.
    Gaya, E.
    González, C.D.
    Gramaje, D.
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Fusarium: more than a node or a foot-shaped basal cell2021In: Studies in mycology, ISSN 0166-0616, E-ISSN 1872-9797, Vol. 98, p. 100116-100116, article id 100116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 68. Crous, P.W.
    et al.
    Quaedvlieg, W
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Hawksworth, D.L.
    Groenwald, J.Z.
    Phacidium and Ceuthospora (Phacidiaceae) are congeneric: taxonomic and nomenclatural implications2014In: IMA Fungus, ISSN 2210-6340, E-ISSN 2210-6359, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 173-193Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 69. De Block, Petra
    et al.
    Rakotonasolo, Franck
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Davis, Aaron
    Janssens, Steven
    Tarennella, a new Pavetteae (Rubiaceae) genus from eastern Madagascar2021In: Plant Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2032-3913, E-ISSN 2032-3921, Vol. 154, no 1, p. 87-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background – This contribution is part of an ongoing study on the taxonomy and the phylogenetic relationships of the Malagasy representatives of the tribe Pavetteae (Rubiaceae).

    Material and methods – Taxonomic methods follow normal practice of herbarium taxonomy. A molecular study using the plastid markers rps16, trnT-F, petD, and accD-psa1, the nuclear ribosomal marker ITS and the nuclear MADS-box gene marker PI was executed.

    Key results – Five new species are described from littoral, lowland, or mid-elevation humid forests in eastern Madagascar. They are characterized by compact inflorescences with small, sessile flowers, a densely pubescent style, large placentas with 2–3 immersed ovules, seeds with a small, superficial hilum not surrounded by a thickened annulus, and pollen grains with supratectal elements. The phylogenetic tree, which included three of the five new species, showed an unresolved backbone but high support for distal nodes grouping species. The new species form a distinct monophyletic clade among the other Malagasy Pavetteae genera and are recognised at genus level under the name Tarennella. Provisional IUCN Red List assessments show that Tarennella homolleana is Vulnerable, T. cordatifolia and T. sanguinea are Endangered, T. puberula is Critically Endangered, and T. coronata is Critically Endangered (Possibly Extinct).

  • 70. De Block, Petra
    et al.
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    The Spermacoceae alliance (subfamily Rubioideae)2022In: The new Natural History of Madagascar / [ed] S. Goodman, USA: Princeton University Press, 2022, p. 770-773Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 71. De Block, Petra
    et al.
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    The Vanguerieae alliance (subfamily Ixoroideae)2022In: The new Natural History of Madagascar / [ed] S. Goodman, USA: Princeton University Press, 2022, p. 762-764Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 72. de Faria, Aparecida Donisete
    et al.
    Pirani, Jóse Rubens
    Lahoz da Silva Ribeiro, José E.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    Terra-Araujo, Mário H.
    Vieira, Pedro P.
    Swenson, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Towards a natural classification of Sapotaceae subfamily Chrysophylloideae in the Neotropics2017In: Botanical journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4074, E-ISSN 1095-8339, Vol. 185, p. 27-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Generic limits of Chrysophyllum and Pouteria (Chrysophylloideae, Sapotaceae) have been found to be untenable. We here search for natural lineages in Neotropical Chrysophylloideae by sampling 101 terminals for molecular sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (external and internal transcribed spacer), the nuclear gene RPB2 and 17 morphological characters. Data were analysed with Bayesian inference and parsimony jackknifing. Morphological traits were finally optimized onto the tree to identify the most coherent characters. The resulting phylogenetic tree suggests that the limits of the well-known genera Chrysophyllum and Pouteria must be amended. Diploon, Ecclinusa and Elaeoluma can be maintained and Chrysophyllum sections Ragala section Prieurella and the satellite gen- era Achrouteria, Cornuella, Martiusella and Nemaluma merit generic resurrection. Lucuma may be restored if the type species belongs to the clade. The accepted genera Chromolucuma, Pradosia and Sarcaulus gain strong clade support, but are embedded in a core clade of Pouteria and may be relegated to the subgeneric level if morphologi- cal studies cannot provide evidence concurring with narrow generic concepts. Circumscriptions of Micropholis and Chrysophyllum sections Chrysophyllum and Villocuspis remain unclear and must be explored by using an extended taxon sampling. We predict that yet-to-be-analysed species of Pouteria sections Franchetella, Gayella, Oxythece and Pouteria and members of the currently accepted genera Chromolucuma, Pradosia and Sarcaulus will fall inside the core clade of Pouteria when analysed. 

  • 73. De Meyer, Marc
    et al.
    Földvari, Mihaly
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Skevington, Jeffrey H.
    61. Pipunculidae2021In: Manual of Afrotropical Diptera. Vol. 3: Brachycera–Cyclorrhapha, excluding Calyptratae / [ed] Kirk-Spriggs, A.H.; Sinclair, B.J., Pretoria: South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) , 2021, p. 1493-1505Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    fulltext
  • 74.
    de Sousa, Filipe
    et al.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bertrand, Yann J. K.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nylinder, Nylinder
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Oxelman, Bengt
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Jonna S.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pfeil, Bernard E.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Phylogenetic Properties of 50 Nuclear Loci in Medicago (Leguminosae) Generated Using Multiplexed Sequence Capture and Next-Generation Sequencing2014In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Next-generation sequencing technology has increased the capacity to generate molecular data for plant biological research,including phylogenetics, and can potentially contribute to resolving complex phylogenetic problems. The evolutionaryhistory of Medicago L. (Leguminosae: Trifoliae) remains unresolved due to incongruence between published phylogenies.Identification of the processes causing this genealogical incongruence is essential for the inference of a correct speciesphylogeny of the genus and requires that more molecular data, preferably from low-copy nuclear genes, are obtainedacross different species. Here we report the development of 50 novel LCN markers in Medicago and assess the phylogeneticproperties of each marker. We used the genomic resources available for Medicago truncatula Gaertn., hybridisation-basedgene enrichment (sequence capture) techniques and Next-Generation Sequencing to generate sequences. This alternativeproves to be a cost-effective approach to amplicon sequencing in phylogenetic studies at the genus or tribe level andallows for an increase in number and size of targeted loci. Substitution rate estimates for each of the 50 loci are provided,and an overview of the variation in substitution rates among a large number of low-copy nuclear genes in plants ispresented for the first time. Aligned sequences of major species lineages of Medicago and its sister genus are made availableand can be used in further probe development for sequence-capture of the same markers.

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  • 75. Dean, W. Richard J.
    et al.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Avian type localities and the type specimens collected by Johan August Wahlberg in southern Africa2022In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5134, no 4, p. 521-560Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Delling, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sabatini, Andrea
    Muracciole, Stephane
    Tougard, Christelle
    Berrebi, Patrick
    Morphologic and genetic characterisation of Corsican and Sardinian trout with comments on Salmo taxonomy2020In: Knowledge & Management of Aquatic EcosystemsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Deprá, Gabriel C.
    et al.
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá.
    Kullander, Sven O.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Pavanelli, Carla S,
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá.
    da Graça, Wefterson J.
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá.
    A new colorful species of Geophagus (Teleostei: Cichlidae), endemic to the rio Aripuanã in the Amazon basin of Brazil2014In: Neotropical Ichthyology, ISSN 1679-6225, E-ISSN 1982-0224, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 737-746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geophagus mirabilis, new species, is endemic to the rio Aripuanã drainage upstream from Dardanelos/Andorinhas falls.The new species is distinguished from all other species of the genus by the presence of one to five large black spots arrangedlongitudinally along the middle of the flank, in addition to the black midlateral spot that is characteristic of species in thegenus and by a pattern of iridescent spots and lines on the head in living specimens. It is further distinguished from allcongeneric species, except G. camopiensis and G. crocatus, by the presence of seven (vs. eight or more) scale rows in thecircumpeduncular series below the lateral line (7 in G. crocatus; 7-9 in G. camopiensis). Including the new species, five cichlids and 11 fish species in total are known only from the upper rio Aripuanã, and 15 fish species in total are known only from the rio Aripuanã drainage

  • 78. Dickinson, Edward C
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Systematic notes on Asian birds 32: The type locality of Hirundo daurica Laxmann, 17692002In: Zoologische Verhandelingen Leiden, ISSN 0024-1652, Vol. 340, p. 205-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The restricted type locality suggested by Brooke (1974) for Hirundo daurica Laxmann, 1769 was apparently made without a translation of the original Swedish description. With this in hand we find it necessary to correct that restriction and move the type locality some 2500 km west.

  • 79. Dickinson, Edward C.
    et al.
    Schodde, Richard
    Australian Biological Resources Study.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Chrochet, Pierre André
    Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive.
    Elliott, Andy
    Lynx Edicions.
    Kirwan, Guy M
    Field Museum of Natural History.
    Correcting the "correct" name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher (Aves: Passeriformes, Muscicapidae, Muscicapa)2014In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3869, no 3, p. 343-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Muscicapa dauurica Pallas, 1811 is shown to be an available name and the oldest available name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher

  • 80. Diederich, P.
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Coppins, B
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Tremella imshaugiae and T. tubulosae (Tremellomycetes, Basidiomycota), two new lichenicolous fungi on Imshaugia aleurites and Hypogymnia tubulosa.2020In: Bulletin de la Société des Naturalistes Luxembourgeois, Vol. 121, p. 239-246Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 81. Diederich, P.
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Etayo, J.
    van den Boom, P.P.G.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Class Agaricostilbomycetes, order Agaricostilbales2022In: Flora of Lichenicolous Fungi, Vol. 1, Basidiomycetes / [ed] Diederich, P., Millanes, A.M., Wedin, M. & Lawrey, J. D., Luxembourg: National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg , 2022, p. 283-303Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 82. Diederich, P.
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Etayo, J.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Class Microbotryomycetes.2022In: Flora of Lichenicolous Fungi, Vol. 1, Basidiomycetes / [ed] Diederich, P., Millanes, A.M., Wedin, M. & Lawrey, J. D., Luxembourg: National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg , 2022, p. 325-330Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 83. Diederich, P.
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Etayo, Javier
    Navarro Villoslada 16, 3° dcha, E–31003 Pamplona, Navarra, Spain.
    van den Boom, Pieter P. G.
    Arafura 16, NL–5691 JA Son, The Netherlands.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Finding the needle in the haystack: a revision of Crittendenia, a surprisingly diverse lichenicolous genus of Agaricostilbomycetes, Pucciniomycotina2022In: The Bryologist, ISSN 0007-2745, E-ISSN 1938-4378, Vol. 125, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 84. Diederich, P.
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Flakus, A.
    Rodriguez-Flakus, P.
    Etayo, J.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Class Cystobasidiomycetes, order Cyphobasidiales2022In: Flora of Lichenicolous Fungi, Vol. 1, Basidiomycetes / [ed] Diederich, P., Millanes, A.M., Wedin, M. & Lawrey, J. D., Luxembourg: National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg , 2022, p. 305-324Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 85. Diederich, P.
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Flakus, A.
    Rodriguez-Flakus, P.
    Etayo, J.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Class Tremellomycetes, order Filobasidiales.2022In: Flora of Lichenicolous Fungi, Vol. 1, Basidiomycetes. / [ed] Diederich, P., Millanes, A.M., Wedin, M. & Lawrey, J. D., Luxembourg: National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg, , 2022, p. 83-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 86. Diederich, P.
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Class Tremellomycetes, order Tremellales2022In: Flora of Lichenicolous Fungi, Vol. 1, Basidiomycetes. / [ed] Diederich, P., Millanes, A.M., Wedin, M. & Lawrey, J. D., Luxembourg: National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg , 2022, p. 105-282Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 87. Diederich, P.
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Tremella umbilicariae (Tremellomycetes, Basidiomycota), a new lichenicolous species on Umbilicaria from Peru2015In: Bulletin de la Société des Naturalistes Luxembourgeois, Vol. 115, p. 167-172Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 88. Diederich, P.
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Tremella umbilicariae (Tremellomycetes, Basidiomycota), a new lichenicolous species on Umbilicaria from Peru2014In: Bulletin de la Société des Naturalistes Luxembourgeois, Vol. 115, p. 167-172Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 89. Diederich, P.
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lawrey, J.D.
    Flora of Lichenicolous Fungi, Vol. 1, Basidiomycetes2022Book (Refereed)
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  • 90. Divakar, Pradeep K.
    et al.
    Crespo, Ana
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Evolution of complex symbiotic relationships in a morphologically derived family of lichen-forming fungi2015In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 208, p. 1217-1226Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Draper, Isabel
    et al.
    Centro de Investigación en Biodiversidad y Cambio Global, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid , ES-28049, Madrid , Spain.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Molecular variation and phylogeography within European Isothecium alopecuroides and Pseudisothecium myosuroides (Bryophyta, Lembophyllaceae)2024In: Botanical journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4074, E-ISSN 1095-8339Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 92. Draper, Isabel
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Stech, Michael
    Patiño, Jairo
    Werner, Olaf
    González-Mancebo, J. M.
    Sim-Sim, Manuela
    Lopes, Tina
    Ros, Rosa María
    How many species of Isothecium(Lembophyllaceae, Bryophyta) are there in Macaronesia? A survey usingintegrative taxonomy2015In: Botanical journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4074, E-ISSN 1095-8339, Vol. 177, p. 418-438Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 93. Drovetski, Sergei V.
    et al.
    Zink, Robert M.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Fadeev, Igor V.
    A multilocus study of pine grosbeak phylogeography supports the pattern of greater intercontinental divergence in Holarctic boreal forest birds than in birds inhabiting other high-latitude habitats2010In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 696-706Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Désamorè, Aurélie
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Laenen, Benjamin
    Miller, Kelly
    University of New Mexico.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Early burst in body size evolution is uncoupled from species diversification in diving beetles (Dytiscidae)2018In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 979-993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in morphology are often thought to be linked to changes in species diversification,

    which is expected to leave a signal of early burst (EB) in phenotypic traits.

    However, such signal is rarely recovered in empirical phylogenies, even for groups

    with well-known adaptive radiation. Using a comprehensive phylogenetic approach

    in Dytiscidae, which harbours ~4,300 species with as much as 50-fold variation in

    body size among them, we ask whether pattern of species diversification correlates

    with morphological evolution. Additionally, we test whether the large variation in

    body size is linked to habitat preference and whether the latter influences species

    turnover. We found, in sharp contrast to most animal groups, that Dytiscidae body

    size evolution follows an early-burst model with subsequent high phylogenetic conservatism.

    However, we found no evidence for associated shifts in species diversification,

    which point to an uncoupled evolution of morphology and species

    diversification. We recovered the ancestral habitat of Dytiscidae as lentic (standing

    water), with many transitions to lotic habitat (running water) that are concomitant

    to a decrease in body size. Finally, we found no evidence for difference in net diversification

    rates between habitats nor difference in turnover in lentic and lotic species.

    This result, together with recent findings in dragonflies, contrasts with some

    theoretical expectations of the habitat stability hypothesis. Thus, a thorough

    reassessment of the impact of dispersal, gene flow and range size on the speciation

    process is needed to fully encompass the evolutionary consequences of the lentic–

    lotic divide for freshwater fauna.

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  • 95. Ekman, Jan
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Out of Gondwanaland; the evolutionary history of cooperative breeding and social behaviour among crows, magpies, jays and allies.2006In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 273, no 1590, p. 1117-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperative breeding is comparatively rare among birds in the mainly temperate and boreal Northern Hemisphere. Here we test if the distribution of breeding systems reflects a response to latitude by means of a phylogenetic analysis using correlates with geographical range among the corvids (crows, jays, magpies and allied groups). The corvids trace their ancestry to the predominantly cooperative 'Corvida' branch of oscine passerines from the Australo-Papuan region on the ancient Gondwanaland supercontinent, but we could not confirm the ancestral state of the breeding system within the family, while family cohesion may be ancestral. Initial diversification among pair-breeding taxa that are basal in the corvid phylogeny, represented by genera such as Pyrrhocorax and Dendrocitta, indicates that the corvid family in its current form could have evolved from pair-breeding ancestors only after they had escaped the Australo-Papuan shield. Within the family, cooperative breeding (alloparental care/family cohesion) is strongly correlated to latitude and its predominance in species maintaining a southerly distribution indicates a secondary evolution of cooperative breeding in the lineage leading away from the basal corvids. Multiple transitions show plasticity in the breeding system, indicating a response to latitude rather than evolutionary inertia. The evolutionary background to the loss of cooperative breeding among species with a northerly distribution is complex and differs between species, indicating a response to a variety of selection forces. Family cohesion where the offspring provide alloparental care is a main route to cooperatively breeding groups among corvids. Some corvid species lost only alloparental care, while maintaining coherent family groups. Other species lost family cohesion and, as a corollary, they also lost the behaviour where retained offspring provide alloparental care.

  • 96. Ekman, Stefan
    et al.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lindblom, Louise
    Jørgensen, Per M.
    Extended phylogeny and a revised generic classification of the Pannariaceae (Peltigerales, Ascomycota)2014In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 46, p. 627-656Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 97. Elmqvist, Håkan
    et al.
    Nyström, Dennis
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Aiolopus thalassinus (Fabricius, 1781), en nygräshoppa för Norden och en migrerande svärm som korsade Östersjön2020In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 141, no 4, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the first finding of the grasshopper Aiolopus thalassinus (Fabricius, 1781) inthe Nordic countries. Two migrating individuals were attracted to light at a known hotspotof migrating moths near the southernmost tip of Gotland in the Baltic Sea, 8th of August2020. End of September hundreds of individuals had made landfall in a bay not far from thefirst locality. The mass occurrence followed after days of easterly or southeasterly winds,a strengthened high pressure over Russia, and an early morning with low-lying clouds.Aiolopus thalassinus is a long-winged grasshopper with strong flight capacity and a widedistribution across the Old World. It also shares some of the density-dependent behavioraland physiological characteristics of the migratory locusts. In Europe the northern continuousdistribution limit stretches through south Germany and middle Poland. The findings onGotland follow the first record in Lithuania, 2019, and a recent trend of expanding rangein south Germany which indicates a species expanding its distribution due to a changingclimate. The findings also show that this is a species capable of swarm migration and crossinga minimum of 170 km of open sea when winds are favorable.

  • 98.
    Englund, Markus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Konsten att göra en höna av en fjäder: DNA-streckkoder i praktiken2014In: Bi-lagan, ISSN 2000-8139, Vol. 1, p. 17-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Med hjälp av korta artspecifika delar av DNA:t, så kallade DNA-streckkoder, är det möjligt att artbestämma till exempel en fågel utifrån bara en fjäder. I och med att tekniken blivit både enklare och billigare har tiden nu blivit mogen för att introducera DNA-streckkoder i skolundervisningen.

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  • 99. Englund, William
    et al.
    Njoroge, Laban
    Biström, Olof
    Miller, Kelly
    University of New Mexico.
    Bilton, David
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Taxonomic revision of the Afrotropical Agabus raffrayi species group with the description of four new species (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae)2020In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 963, p. 45-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We revise the Afrotropical Agabus raffrayi species group, motivated by the discovery of new diversity in Kenya and South Africa. Whilst Agabus is mainly a holarctic genus, the Agabus raffrayi group is restricted to high altitude regions of eastern Africa and temperate parts of South Africa, from where we describe the southernmost Agabus in the world. The following new species are introduced: Agabus anguluverpus sp. nov. from Mount Kenya in central Kenya, Agabus austellus sp. nov. a widespread species in South Africa, Agabus riberae sp. nov. from the Kamiesberg and northeastern Cederberg ranges in the Northern and Western Cape Provinces of South Africa and Agabus agulhas sp. nov. from the Agulhas Plain, Western Cape Province, South Africa. We provide a distribution map, a determination key for males, quantitative measurements of diagnostic characters, habitus photos and detailed photos of male genitalia for all described species in the group, as well as images of diagnostic characters and habitats. The presence or absence of an elongated section between the subapical broadening and the base of the apical and subapical teeth of the male aedeagus is a useful novel character, first revealed by our study. In contrast with the most recent revision of Afrotropical Agabus, we show that Agabus ruwenzoricus Guignot, 1936 is restricted to eastern Africa; South African records of this species having been based on misidentifications, no species of the group being common to southern and eastern Africa. We speculate that the raffrayi group may display phylogenetic niche conservatism, being restricted, as an originally temperate taxon, to higher elevations in tropical eastern Africa, but occurring at lower altitudes in temperate South Africa.

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  • 100. Enroth, Johannes
    et al.
    Olsson, Sanna
    Huttunen, Sanna
    Buchbender, Volker
    Tangney, Ray
    Stech, Michael
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Quandt, Dietmar
    Orthostichellaceae fam. nov. and other novelties inpleurocarpous mosses revealed by phylogenetic analyses2019In: The Bryologist, ISSN 0007-2745, E-ISSN 1938-4378, Vol. 122, no 2, p. 219-245Article in journal (Refereed)
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