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  • 51. Bjelke, Ulf
    et al.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vattenytans mästare2018In: Yrfän, Vol. 2018, no 3, p. 9-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 52. Black, Andrew B.
    et al.
    Jansen, Justin J.F.
    Frahnert, Sylke
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Provisional identification of historical grasswren(Amytornis: Maluridae) specimens in European collectionsdraws attention to the incomplete phylogeny of the group2019In: Bulletin of the British Ornithologists' Club, ISSN 0007-1595, Vol. 139, no 3, p. 228-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylogeny and systematics of grasswrens Amytornis species areincompletely resolved, in particular for three widely distributed members ofthe genus. In part this is a consequence of the dispersal to European and NorthAmerican collections of early specimens of now extinct populations. We describethree historical grasswren specimens from museums in Berlin and Stockholm, all ofwhich represent taxa for which phylogenetic and / or other data are incomplete. Wefurther identify other specimens that might contribute towards greater resolutionof grasswren phylogeny.

  • 53. Blank, Stephan M
    et al.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Case 3538: CORYNINAE Benson, 1938 (Insecta, Hymenoptera, CIMBICIDAE): proposed emendation of spelling to CORYNIDINAE to remove homonymy with CORYNIDAE Johnston, 1836 (Cnidaria, Anthoathecata)2011In: Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 113-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54. Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Andersson, Johan
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bjelke, Ulf
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Hilding-Rydevik, Tuija
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University.
    Effects of management intensity, function and vegetation on the biodiversity in urban ponds2016In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, Vol. 20, p. 103-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ponds are important elements of green areas in cities that help counteract the negative consequences of urbanization, by providing important habitats for biodiversity in cities and being essential nodes in the overall landscape-scale habitat network. However, there is relatively little knowledge about the impacts of pond management intensity, function and environmental variables on urban pond biodiversity. In this study we addressed this gap by investigating which factors were correlated with the level of biodiversity in urban ponds, indicated by species richness of aquatic insects, in Stockholm, Sweden. Our study did not confirm any direct link between the perceived intensity of management or function of ponds and overall biodiversity. However, it seems that management can influence particular groups of species indirectly, since we found that Trichoptera richness (Caddisflies) was highest at intermediate management intensity. We suggest that this is caused by management of vegetation, as the amount of floating and emergent vegetation was significantly correlated with both the overall species richness and the richness of Trichoptera (Caddisflies). This relationship was non-linear, since ponds with an intermediate coverage of vegetation had the highest richness. Interestingly, the amount of vegetation in the pond was significantly affected by pond function and pond management. The overall species richness and richness of Trichoptera were also positively correlated with pond size. Since we found that the pattern of relations between species richness and environmental variables differed between the insect groups we suggest that it will be difficult to provide overall design and management recommendations for ponds in urban green areas. Therefore, it is recommended that to provide high aquatic diversity of species in urban areas one should aim at promoting high diversity of different types of ponds with differing management and environmental factors that shape them.

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  • 55. Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Andersson, Johan
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bjelke, Ulf
    Hilding-Rydevik, Tuija
    Thomsson, Michaela
    Östh, John
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University.
    Is there a relationship between socio-economic factors and biodiversity in urban ponds? A study in the city of Stockholm2017In: Urban Ecosystems, ISSN 1083-8155, E-ISSN 1573-1642, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban small water bodies, such as ponds, are essential elements of human socio-economic landscapes. Ponds also provide important habitats for species that would otherwise not survive in the urban environment. Knowledge on the biodiversity of urban ponds and the relationship between their ecological value and factors linked to urbanization and socio-economic status is crucial for decisions on where and how to establish and manage ponds in cities to deliver maximum biodiversity benefits. Our study investigates if the pattern of urban-pond biodiversity can be related to different socio-economic factors, such as level of wealth, education or percentage of buildings of different types. Because of lack of previous studies investigating that, our study is of exploratory character and many different variables are used.We found that the biodiversity of aquatic insects was significantly negatively associated with urbanisation variables such as amount of buildings and number of residents living around ponds. This relationship did not differ depending on the spatial scale of our investigation. In contrast, we did not find a significant relationship with variables representing socio-economic status, such as education level and wealth of people. This latter result suggests that the socio-economic status of residents does not lead to any particular effect in terms of the management and function of ponds that would affect biodiversity. However, there is a need for a finer-scale investigation of the different potential mechanism in which residents in areas with differing socio-economic status could indirectly influence ponds.

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  • 56. Bohlin, Erland
    et al.
    Hallgren, Susanne
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Unikt skolmuseum i Örebro hotat2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 10 september, p. Kultur 24-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 57. Boissin, Emilie
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Chenuil, Anne
    Did vicariance and adaptation drive cryptic speciation and evolution of brooding in Ophioderma longicauda (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea), a common Atlanto-Mediterranean ophiuroid?2011In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 20, no 22, p. 4737-4755Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 58. Boscaro, Vittorio
    et al.
    Holt, Corey C.
    Van Steenkiste, Niels W. L.
    Herranz, M
    Irwin, Nicholas A. T.
    Àlvarez-Campos, Patricia
    Grzelak, Katarzyna
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kerbl, A.
    Mathur, V.
    Okamoto, N.
    Piercey, Rebecca S.
    Worsaae, Katrine
    Leander, Brian S.
    Keeling, Patrick J.
    Microbiomes of microscopic marine invertebrates do not reveal signatures of phylosymbiosis2022In: Nature Microbiology, E-ISSN 2058-5276, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 810-819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animals and microorganisms often establish close ecological relationships. However, much of our knowledge about animal microbiomes comes from two deeply studied groups: vertebrates and arthropods. To understand interactions on a broader scale of diversity, we characterized the bacterial microbiomes of close to 1,000 microscopic marine invertebrates from 21 phyla, spanning most of the remaining tree of metazoans. Samples were collected from five temperate and tropical locations covering three marine habitats (sediment, water column and intertidal macroalgae) and bacterial microbiomes were characterized using 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Our data show that, despite their size, these animals harbour bacterial communities that differ from those in the surrounding environment. Distantly related but coexisting invertebrates tend to share many of the same bacteria, suggesting that guilds of microorganisms preferentially associated with animals, but not tied to any specific host lineage, are the main drivers of the ecological relationship. Host identity is a minor factor shaping these microbiomes, which do not show the same correlation with host phylogeny, or ‘phylosymbiosis’, observed in many large animals. Hence, the current debate on the varying strength of phylosymbiosis within selected lineages should be reframed to account for the possibility that such a pattern might be the exception rather than the rule.

  • 59.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Antarktis okända små djur2021In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 40-48Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Almost 370 samples were collected from three typesof habitats, viz. fellfield soils, mosses and ornithogenicsoils, on 14 mountain outcrops penetrating the ice sheet(nunataks) and one oasis in Dronning Maud Land, EastAntarctica. The samples were analyzed for metazoan microfauna(nematodes, rotifers and tardigrades). Studiesreveal that the populations of microfauna are patchilydistributed. Fauna composition of the microscopic animalswas found to vary greatly also among samples fromsimilar types of habitats. The presence of seemingly similarhabitable sites lacking microfauna and sites withdifferent combinations of animal taxa indicates that randomcolonization processes as well as local environmentaland historical factors might influence fauna compositionin specific habitable patches.

  • 60.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kvalster - våra minsta husdjur2022In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 32-37Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 61.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ny biografi om Axel Ohlin2017In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 112, no 3, p. 39-40Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 62.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Havsbottens mikroskopiska hajar2022In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 44-48Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 63.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Carl Allgén – Svensk zoolog och nematodforskare2020In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 115, no 2, p. 42-45Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 64.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description  of  a  new  species  of  Paracrobeles  Heyns,  1968  (Nematoda,   Rhabditida, Cephalobidae)  from  Kelso  Dunes,  Mojave  National   Preserve,  California,  USA2015In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 117, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new species of Paracrobeles, P. kelsodunensis sp. nov. is described from the Kelso Dunes area, Mojave National Preserve, southern California. Paracrobeles kelsodunensis sp. nov. is particularly characterised by a body length of 469–626 μm in females and 463–569 μm in males; lateral field with four incisures, extending almost to tail terminus; three pairs of asymmetrical lips, separated by U-shaped primary axils with two long guarding processes, each lip usually with four tines along its margin; three long labial probolae, deeply bifurcated, with slender prongs without tines; metastegostom with a strong anteriorly directed dorsal tooth; pharyngeal corpus anteriorly spindle-shaped, posteriorly elongate bulbous with dilated lumen; spermatheca 24–87 μm long; postvulval uterine sac 60–133 μm long; vulva in a sunken area; spicules 33–38 μm long; and male tail with a 5–8 μm long mucro. The generic diagnosis is emended on the basis of recently described species and a key to the species of Paracrobeles is provided.

  • 65.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description of Cribronema sturhani sp. n. (Nematoda, Rhabditida, Cephalobidae), a second species of a rare genus from Cameroon2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4695, no 2, p. 175-181Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description of Drilocephalobus moldavicus Lisetskaya,1968 (Rhabditida: Osstellidae) from Kelso Dunes, Mojave National Reserve, California,USA2018In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4514, no 3, p. 438-444Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Descriptions of species of Stegelleta Thorne, 1938 (Nematoda, Rhabditida, Cephalobidae) from California, New Zealand and Senegal, and a revision of the genus2014In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 87, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Populations of Stegelleta are described from California, New Zealand and Senegal. An amphimictic population from California is identified as belonging to S. incisa and compared with type specimens from Utah and an amphimictic population from Italy. One population from New Zealand is close to S. incisa but considered to represent a new species, Stegelleta laterocornuta sp. nov. It is particularly characterised by a 379–512 μm long body in females and 365–476 μm in males; cuticle divided into 16 rows of blocks at midbody (excluding lateral field); lateral field with four incisures; three pairs of asymmetrical lips, U-shaped primary axils without guarding processes, each lip asymmetrically rectangular with a smooth margin, only lateral lips have slender acute tines; three labial probolae, bifurcated at half of their length; vulva without flap; spermatheca 17–31 μm long; postuterine sac 7–24 μm long; spicules 21.5–23.5 μm long. Other specimens from New Zealand are identified as belonging to S. tuarua. A parthenogenetic population from Senegal is identified as belonging to S. ophioglossa and compared with type specimens from Mongolia and records of several other populations of S. ophioglossa. The generic diagnosis is emended and a key to the species of Stegelleta is provided.

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  • 68.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Suktorier (Ciliophora – ciliater) som beskrivits av Carl Allgén2023In: Fauna & flora: en spegling av svensk natur, E-ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 48-53Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 69.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The Swedish marine nematologist Carl Allgén (1886–1960): a bio-bibliography and his collection2017In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4232, no 4, p. 451-490Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Variationsrika rundmaskar2020In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 115, no 4, p. 48-53Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 71.
    Bouguerche, Chahinez
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Arthur Looss försvunna parasitsamlingar återfunna2024In: Fauna & flora: en spegling av svensk natur, E-ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 26-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 72.
    Bouguerche, Chahinez
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Huston, Daniel C.
    Australian National Insect Collection, National Research Collections Australia, CSIRO, PO Box 1700, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia.
    Cribb, Thomas H.
    The University of Queensland, School of Biological Sciences, St Lucia, QLD, 4072, Australia.
    Karlsbakk, Egil
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, 7803, 5020 Bergen, Norway.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hidden in the fog: morphological and molecular characterisation of Derogenes varicus sensu stricto (Trematoda, Derogenidae) from Sweden and Norway, and redescription of two poorly known Derogenes species2023In: Parasite, ISSN 1252-607X, E-ISSN 1776-1042, Vol. 30, p. 35-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Derogenes varicus (Müller, 1784) is widely reported as a trematode with exceptionally low host specificity and a wide, bipolar distribution. However, several recent studies have suggested that D. varicus represents a species complex and based on molecular evidence, four genetic lineages (labeled as “DV1–4”) have been designated within the D. varicus species complex. This possibility requires improved (ideally molecular) characterisation of specimens from the type-host (Salmo salar) and type-locality (off Denmark). During examination of trematode parasites of fish from Scandinavian and Arctic waters (Sweden and Norway), we found specimens of D. varicus in the stomach of Merlangius merlangus off the coast of Sweden, and in Gadus morhua off the coast of Sweden and Norway; we compared them to D. varicus from the type-host, the Atlantic salmon Salmo salar from Norway, to verify their conspecificity. Newly generated sequences (28S rDNA, ITS2 and cox1) of Scandinavian and Arctic specimens consistent with D. varicus all formed a single clade, DV1. 28S sequences of D. varicus from S. salar from Norway, i.e., close to the Danish type locality, clustered within the DV1 clade along with sequences of D. varicus from various hosts including Limanda limanda, G. morhua and Myoxocephalus scorpius from the White Sea and the Barents Sea (Russia), without any host-related structuring. We thus consider that the lineage DV1 represents D. varicus sensu stricto. Additionally, specimens from M. merlangus had a similar morphology and anatomy to those of D. varicus from L. limanda, G. morhua and M. scorpius from T. Odhner’s collection, supporting the presence of a single species in the DV1 lineage designated herein as D. varicus sensu stricto. We redescribe D. varicus sensu stricto, add new morphological characters and provide morphometric data. We infer that D. varicus types DV2–4 all relate to separate species. We also revise type-specimens of Derogenes minor Looss, 1901 from the A. Looss collection in the Swedish Museum of Natural History and provide redescriptions of it and of the type-species of the genus, Derogenes ruber Lühe, 1900. In light of their morphological distinctiveness relative to D. varicus sensu stricto, we reinstate D. parvus Szidat, 1950 and D. fuhrmanni Mola, 1912.

  • 73.
    Bouguerche, Chahinez
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Justine, Jean-Lou
    nstitut Systématique Évolution Biodiversité (ISYEB), Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, CNRS, Sorbonne Université, EPHE, Université des Antilles, 57 rue Cuvier, CP 51, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France.
    Ayadi, Zouhour El Mouna
    Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Faculté des Sciences Biologiques, Laboratoire de Biodiversité et Environnement: Interactions - Génomes, Alger, Algeria.
    Tazerouti, Fadila
    Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Faculté des Sciences Biologiques, Laboratoire de Biodiversité et Environnement: Interactions - Génomes, Alger, Algeria.
    Redescription of Axine belones Abildgaard, 1794 (Monogenea, Axinidae), a gill parasite of Belone belone (Linnaeus, 1760) (Teleostei, Belonidae) off the Algerian coast, Western Mediterranean2023In: Acta Adriatica, ISSN 0001-5113, E-ISSN 1846-0453, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Axine belones Abildgaard, 1794 is a polyopisthocotylean monogenean, parasite of belonid fishes, and there are few accounts with morphological and morphometrical data. Here, we redescribe A. belones based on newly collected specimens from its type-host, the garfish Belone belone (Linnaeus, 1760) collected off Algeria, Western Mediterranean, a new locality for this species. Several anatomical and morphological features (genital apertures and clamps sclerites) are described and illustrated. We provide morpho-anatomical and morphometrical data, along with detailed illustrations of A. belones, and we discuss the host specificity of A. belones. Notes on hosts and localities of this species and other congeners are presented, and host specificity patterns of A. belones revealed stenoxenic specificity to Belonidae Bonaparte, 1835, whilst the genus Axine Abildgaard, 1794 seems to be restricted to fishes of the order Beloniformes. Our attempt to investigate morphometric variations between Mediterranean and oceanic specimens revealed that the two populations differed by the number of testes, body length, and clamp dimensions. However, the limited number of measured organs in the various accounts precluded any distinction between the populations. Molecular data for both Mediterranean and oceanic specimens are needed to determine the existence of cryptic species. 

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  • 74.
    Bouguerche, Chahinez
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Tazerouti, Fadila
    Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Faculté des Sciences Biologiques, Laboratoire de Biodiversité et Environnement: Interactions - Génomes, BP 32, El Alia Bab Ezzouar, Alger, Algérie.
    Justine, Jean-Lou
    nstitut Systématique Évolution Biodiversité (ISYEB), Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, CNRS, Sorbonne Université, EPHE, Université des Antilles, 57 rue Cuvier, CP 51, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France.
    Truly a hyperparasite, or simply an epibiont on a parasite? The case of Cyclocotyla bellones (Monogenea, Diclidophoridae)2022In: Parasite, ISSN 1252-607X, E-ISSN 1776-1042, Vol. 29, no 28, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclocotyla bellones Otto, 1823 (Monogenea, Diclidophoridae) is one of the few monogenean species reported as hyperparasitic: the worms dwell on cymothoid isopods, themselves parasites of the buccal cavity of fishes. We present here observations based on newly collected monogenean specimens from Ceratothoa parallela (Otto, 1828), an isopod parasite of Boops boops off Algeria and also investigated its diet to address whether Cy. bellones is indeed a hyperparasite, i.e., whether it feeds on the isopod. We also compared the body shape of various monogeneans belonging to the same family as Cy. bellones, the Diclidophoridae, including Choricotyle cf. chrysophryi Van Beneden & Hesse, 1863, collected from Pagellus acarne off Algeria. No morphological character of the anterior organs suggested any special adaptation in Cy. bellones to the perforation of the crustacean cuticle. The wall of the oesophagus and of the intestine of Cy. bellones was lined with a dark pigment similar to what is usually observed in haematophagous polyopisthocotyleans, and which is derived from ingested fish blood. We noticed that an anterior elongate stem exists only in diclidophorids dwelling on parasitic isopods and never in those attached to the gills. We hypothesize that the anterior stem of the body of Cy. bellones is an anatomical adaptation for the monogenean to feed on the fish while dwelling on the isopod. We thus consider that Cy. bellones is an epibiont of the parasitic crustacean, as it uses it merely as an attachment substrate, and is not a true hyperparasite

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    Bouguerche C. et al. 2022 Truly a hyperparasite, or simply an epibiont on a parasite?
  • 75. Brantberg, Krister
    et al.
    Babak, F.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Do extant elephants have superior canal dehiscence syndrome?2015In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 76. Brealey, Jaelle C.
    et al.
    Leitao, Henrique G.
    Department of Ecology and Genetics/Animal Ecology, Uppsala University.
    Hofstede, Thijs
    Department of Ecology and Genetics/Animal Ecology, Uppsala University.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Guschanski, Katerina
    Department of Ecology and Genetics/Animal Ecology, Uppsala University.
    The oral microbiota of wild bears in Sweden reflects the history of antibiotic use by humans2021In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 31, no 20, p. 4650-4658.e6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the advent of industrial-scale antibiotic production in the 1940s,1 antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has been on the rise and now poses a major global health threat in terms of mortality, morbidity, and economic burden.2,3 Because AMR can be exchanged between humans, livestock, and wildlife, wild animals can be used as indicators of human-associated AMR contamination of the environment.4 However, AMR is a normal function of natural environments and is present in host-associated microbiomes, which makes it challenging to distinguish between anthropogenic and natural sources.4,5 One way to overcome this difficulty is to use historical samples that span the period from before the mass production of antibiotics to today. We used shotgun metagenomic sequencing of dental calculus, the calcified form of the oral microbial biofilm, to determine the abundance and repertoire of AMR genes in the oral microbiome of Swedish brown bears collected over the last 180 years. Our temporal metagenomics approach allowed us to establish a baseline of natural AMR in the pre-antibiotics era and to quantify a significant increase in total AMR load and diversity of AMR genes that is consistent with patterns of national human antibiotic use. We also demonstrated a significant decrease in total AMR load in bears in the last two decades, which coincides with Swedish strategies to mitigate AMR. Our study suggests that public health policies can be effective in limiting human-associated AMR contamination of the environment and wildlife.

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  • 77. Britz, R.
    et al.
    Kottelat, M
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. FishBase.
    A note on Muraena alba Zuiew, 1793 (Teleostei: Synbranchidae)2021In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4949, no 2, p. 398-400Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Britz, Ralf
    et al.
    Senckenberg Natural History Collections Dresden, Museum of Zoology.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rüber, Lukas
    Naturhistorisches Museum Bern.
    Dario tigris and Dario melanogrammus, two new species of miniature chameleon fishes from northern Myanmar (Teleostei: Badidae)2022In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5138, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dario tigris, new species, is described from mountain streams south of Mogaung, in the Ayeyarwaddy River basin, Myanmar. It differs from congeneric species by its unique colour pattern, which consists of a series of eight straight vertical bars, the first two of which in males are ash-grey and the subsequent six are orange-red in life, combined with a series of small black spots arranged in three to four rows dorsolaterally on the head and nape. It differs further from its close relative Dario hysginon, with which it may occur syntopically, by fewer dorsal-fin spines (modally 14 vs modally 15), and fewer vertebrae (modally 12+12=24 vs modally 12+13= 25). Dario melanogrammus, new species, is another barred Dario from the Chindwin River basin. It differs from all other species of the genus by its zigzagging dark vertical bars; amongst Myanmar species, it can be further distinguished from D. hysginon and D. tigris by more vertebrae (modally 26 vs 25 in D. hysginon, and 24 in D. tigris).

  • 79.
    Britzke, Ricardo
    et al.
    Universidade Estadual Paulista.
    Oliveira, Claudio
    Universidade Estadual Paulista.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Apistogramma ortegai (Teleostei: Cichlidae), a new species of cichlid fish from the Ampyiacu River in the Peruvian Amazon basin2014In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3869, no 4, p. 409-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apistogramma ortegai, new species, is described from small streams tributaries of the Ampiyacu River near Pebas, in easternPeru. It belongs to the Apistogramma regani species group and is distinguished from all other species of Apistogrammaby the combination of contiguous caudal spot to bar 7, presence of abdominal stripes, short dorsal-fin lappets in both sexes,absence of vertical stripes on the caudal fin, and reduced number of predorsal and prepelvic scales.

  • 80. Broad, G. R.
    et al.
    Stigenberg, J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The genus Orionis Shaw (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Euphorinae) in the Old World.2021In: Journal of Hymenoptera Research, ISSN 1070-9428, E-ISSN 1314-2607, Vol. 88, p. 133-145Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Brodin, Yngve
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hellberg, Jörgen
    Smaller, lighter coloured and less hairy Procladius (Diptera, Chironomidae) in warmer climate2023In: Biologia, ISSN 0006-3088, E-ISSN 1336-9563, Vol. 78, no 8, p. 2091-2098Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Broman, Elias
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Bonaglia, Stefano
    Stockholm University.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Marzocchi, Ugo
    Aarhus University.
    Hall, Per O.J.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Nascimento, Francisco J.A.
    Stockholm University.
    Uncovering diversity and metabolic spectrum of animals in dead zone sediments2020In: Communications Biology, E-ISSN 2399-3642, Vol. 3, p. 1-12, article id 106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ocean deoxygenation driven by global warming and eutrophication is a primary concern for marine life. Resistant animals may be present in dead zone sediments, however there is lack of information on their diversity and metabolism. Here we combined geochemistry, microscopy, and RNA-seq for estimating taxonomy and functionality of micrometazoans along an oxygen gradient in the largest dead zone in the world. Nematodes are metabolically active at oxygen concentrations below 1.8μmolL−1, and their diversity and community structure are different between low oxygen areas. This is likely due to toxic hydrogen sulfide and its potential to be oxidized by oxygen or nitrate. Zooplankton resting stages dominate the metazoan community, and these populations possibly use cytochrome c oxidase as an oxygen sensor to exit dormancy. Our study sheds light on mechanisms of animal adaptation to extreme environments. These biological resources can be essential for recolonization of dead zones when oxygen conditions improve.

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  • 83. Buffington, Matthew L
    et al.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Redescription of Ganaspis brasiliensis (Ihering, 1905), new combiantion, (Hymenoptera: Figitidae) a natural enemy of the invasive Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura, 1931) (Diptera: Drosophilidae)2016In: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, ISSN 0013-8797, Vol. 118, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new combination of Ganaspis brasiliensis (Ihering, 1905) is proposed, and the species is redescribed from historical specimens taken in the Neotropical Region as well as more recent specimens reared from Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, 1931 in South Korea. Drosophila suzukii, otherwise known as the spotted-wing Drosophila, is a major pest of soft fruits the world over, and the search for effective natural enemies of this fly are ongoing. Though not parasitoids of D. suzukii, we also propose the following new combinations: Dieucoila brasiliensis (Kieffer, 1909), new combination, and Dieucoila brasiliana (Weld, 1952), new combination. After summarizing all known species of Eucoilinae with the specific epithet ‘brasiliensis’, we encourage future researchers to avoid this name in order prevent nomenclatural confusion.

  • 84. Buffington, Matthew L
    et al.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The description of Garudella Buffington and Forshage, new genus (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae)2014In: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, ISSN 0013-8797, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 225-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Garudella, a remarkable new genus of eucoiline wasp is described from Thailand, Laos, and the Republic of Congo. Four new species of Garudella are described as well: G. acothonaspis, G. afrotropica, G. algo, and G. alicae. Several autapomorphies distinguish this genus from other eucoiline genera: a distinctly protracted and broadened pronotal plate; a massive, posteriorly protruding prop- odeum; reduced posterior rim of metapleuron; reduced scutellar foveae and lack of lateral bar “windows”; and a generally reduced scutellar plate. In addition, the posterior of the head has a distinctly curved occipital impression, resulting in the cuticle surrounding the foramen magnum to be extruded into a neck-like process. The biology of Garudella is unknown, but based on phylogenetic inference from morphology, the presumed host could be a cyclorrhaphous Diptera in a saprophagous environment.

  • 85. Buffington, Matthew L
    et al.
    Gallardo, Fabiana E
    Reche, Vanina
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A Revision of Zaeucoila Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Figitidae), Parasitoids of Agromyzidae (Diptera): New Species, Identity, Distribution, and Hosts2017In: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, ISSN 0013-8797, Vol. 119, no 3, p. 317-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eucoiline genus Zaeucoila Ashmead is revised. Following a re- evaluation combining previously published phylogenetic data and new specimens, Agrostocynips D ́ıaz is synonymized with Zaeucoila. All species included in Zaeucoila are systematically treated, and now amounts to twelve, seven of which are described as new here: Zaeucoila bitiburculata new species, Z. fidalgoii new species, Z. infuscata new species, Z. johnsonii new species, Z. lignys new species, Z. normae new species, Z. patera new species. The following new combinations are proposed and species redescribed: Zaeucoila grenadensis (Ashmead), new combination; Z. robusta (Ashmead), new combination; Z. flavipes (Ashmead), new combination. Agrostocynips diastrophi (Ashmead), Agrostocynips clavatus D ́ıaz, and Agrostocynips enneatoma (D ́ıaz) are new synonyms of Zaeucoila robusta. Zaeucoila incompleta (Kieffer), Z. triangu- lifera Kieffer, and Z. unicarinata Ashmead are redescribed. Zaeucoila is an unusual genus of Zaeucoilini in its wide distribution area: it can be found from southern Argentina well into the eastern United States and southern Canada; no other zaeucoiline genus shows such a pattern. Host records and geographic data for Zaeucoila are brought up to date, as well as a key to species. Zeucoila are primary parasitoids of Agromyzidae, including Liriomyza trifolii and other species that are notable economic pests of agriculture. Tropideucoila fulvonotata (Kieffer) is transferred to Marthiella (new combination).

  • 86.
    Bukontaite, Rasa
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    Miller, Kelly
    University of New Mexico.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The utility of CAD in recovering Gondwanan vicariance events and the evolutionary history of Aciliini (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae).2014In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Aciliini presently includes 69 species of medium-sized water beetles distributed on all continents except Antarctica. The pattern of distribution with several genera confined to different continents of the Southern Hemisphere raises the yet untested hypothesis of a Gondwana vicariance origin. The monophyly of Aciliini has been questioned with regard to Eretini, and there are competing hypotheses about the intergeneric relationship in the tribe. This study is the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis focused on the tribe Aciliini and it is based on eight gene fragments. The aims of the present study are: 1) to test the monophyly of Aciliini and clarify the position of the tribe Eretini and to resolve the relationship among genera within Aciliini, 2) to calibrate the divergence times within Aciliini and test different biogeographical scenarios, and 3) to evaluate the utility of the gene CAD for phylogenetic analysis in Dytiscidae.

    Results

    Our analyses confirm monophyly of Aciliini with Eretini as its sister group. Each of six genera which have multiple species are also supported as monophyletic. The origin of the tribe is firmly based in the Southern Hemisphere with the arrangement of Neotropical and Afrotropical taxa as the most basal clades suggesting a Gondwana vicariance origin. However, the uncertainty as to whether a fossil can be used as a stem-or crowngroup calibration point for Acilius influenced the result: as crowngroup calibration, the 95% HPD interval for the basal nodes included the geological age estimate for the Gondwana break-up, but as a stem group calibration the basal nodes were too young. Our study suggests CAD to be the most informative marker between 15 and 50 Ma. Notably, the 2000 bp CAD fragment analyzed alone fully resolved the tree with high support.

    Conclusions

    1) Molecular data confirmed Aciliini as a monophyletic group. 2) Bayesian optimizations of the biogeographical history are consistent with an influence of Gondwana break-up history, but were dependent on the calibration method. 3) The evaluation using a method of phylogenetic signal per base pair indicated Wnt and CAD as the most informative of our sampled genes.

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  • 87.
    Cannon, Johanna
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Auburn University.
    Kocot, Kevin
    University of Alabama.
    Phylogenomic approaches using transcriptome data.2016In: Marine Genomics: Methods and Protocols / [ed] Sarah Bourlat, New York: Humana Press, 2016, p. 65-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Cannon, Johanna
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Auburn University.
    Kocot, Kevin
    University of Queensland.
    Waits, Damien
    Auburn University.
    Weese, David
    Georgia College and State University.
    Swalla, Billie
    University of Washington.
    Santos, Scott
    Auburn University.
    Halanych, Kenneth
    Auburn University.
    Phylogenomic Resolution of the Hemichordate and Echinoderm Clade2014In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 24, p. 2827-2832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ambulacraria, comprising Hemichordata and Echinodermata, is closely related to Chordata, making it integral to understanding chordate origins and polarizing chordate molecular and morphological characters. Unfortunately, relationships within Hemichordata and Echinoder- mata have remained unresolved, compromising our ability to extrapolate findings from the most closely related molecular and developmental models outside of Chordata (e.g., the acorn worms Saccoglossus kowalevskii and Ptychodera flava and the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). To resolve long-standing phylogenetic issues within Ambulacraria, we sequenced transcriptomes for 14 hemichordates as well as 8 echinoderms and complemented these with existing data for a total of 33 ambulacrarian operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Examination of leaf stability values revealed rhabdopleurid pterobranchs and the enteropneust Stereobalanus canadensis were unstable in placement; therefore, analyses were also run without these taxa. Analyses of 185 genes resulted in reciprocal monophyly of Enteropneusta and Pterobranchia, placed the deep-sea family Torquaratoridae within Ptychoderidae, and confirmed the position of ophiuroid brittle stars as sister to asteroid sea stars (the Asterozoa hypothesis). These results are consistent with earlier perspectives concerning plesiomorphies of Ambulacraria, including pharyngeal gill slits, a single axocoel, and paired hydrocoels and somatocoels. The resolved ambulacrarian phylogeny will help clarify the early evolution of chordate characteristics and has implications for our understanding of major fossil groups, including graptolites and somasteroideans. 

  • 89.
    Cannon, Johanna
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Auburn University.
    Vellutini, Bruno
    Sars International Centre for Marine Molecular Biology.
    Smith, Julian
    Winthrop University.
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hejnol, Andreas
    Sars International Centre for Marine Molecular Biology.
    Xenacoelomorpha is the sister group to Nephrozoa2016In: Nature, ISSN ISSN: 0028-0836, Vol. 530, p. 89-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The position of Xenacoelomorpha in the tree of life remains a major unresolved question in the study of deep animal relationships1. Xenacoelomorpha, comprising Acoela, Nemertodermatida, and Xenoturbella, are bilaterally symmetrical marine worms that lack several features common to most other bilaterians, for example an anus, nephridia, and a circulatory system. Two conflicting hypotheses are under debate: Xenacoelomorpha is the sister group to all remaining Bilateria (= Nephrozoa, namely protostomes and deuterostomes)2,3 or is a clade inside Deuterostomia4. Thus, determining the phylogenetic position of this clade is pivotal for understanding the early evolution of bilaterian features, or as a case of drastic secondary loss of complexity. Here we show robust phylogenomic support for Xenacoelomorpha as the sister taxon of Nephrozoa. Our phylogenetic analyses, based on 11 novel xenacoelomorph transcriptomes and using different models of evolution under maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses, strongly corroborate this result. Rigorous testing of 25 experimental data sets designed to exclude data partitions and taxa potentially prone to reconstruction biases indicates that long- branch attraction, saturation, and missing data do not influence these results. The sister group relationship between Nephrozoa and Xenacoelomorpha supported by our phylogenomic analyses implies that the last common ancestor of bilaterians was probably a benthic, ciliated acoelomate worm with a single opening into an epithelial gut, and that excretory organs, coelomic cavities, and nerve cords evolved after xenacoelomorphs separated from the stem lineage of Nephrozoa. 

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  • 90. Cappellini, Enrico
    et al.
    Gentry, Anthea
    Palkopoulou, Eleftheria
    Ishida, Yasuko
    Cram, David
    Roos, Anna-Marie
    Watson, Mick
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Fernholm, Bo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Agnelli, Paolo
    Barbagli, Fausto
    Littlewood, D. Tim. J.
    Kelstrup, Christian D.
    Olsen, Jesper V.
    Lister, Adrian M.
    Roca, Alfred L.
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Resolution of the type material of the Asian elephant, Elephas maximus Linnaeus, 1758 (Proboscidea, Elephantidae)2014In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 170, p. 222-232Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 91. Cavalcante, Bruna Maria Silva
    et al.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Three new species of Oxyethira Eaton, 1873 (Trichoptera: Hydroptilidae) from New Caledonia2022In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 789, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxyethira Eaton, 1873 is one of the most diverse genera of Hydroptilidae, comprising over 240 species distributed in all biogeographical regions. Here three new species of Oxyethira (Trichoglene) Neboiss, 1977 are described and illustrated from male specimens collected in New Caledonia: O. (Trichoglene) hamus sp. nov., recognized by the hook-shaped apex of the long inferior appendages in lateral view and by the posterior margin of segment IX with a trilobed appearance in ventral view; O. (Trichoglene) rectangulata sp. nov., recognized by the rectangular shape of the inferior appendages, which are totally fused and with two pairs of small setae on the inner face; and O. (Trichoglene) spiralis sp. nov., recognized by the strongly curvilinear shape of the subgenital process in dorsal 

  • 92.
    Ceríaco, Luis M P
    et al.
    Natural History and Science Museum, University of Porto, Porto , 4099-002 , Portugal.
    Aescht, Erna
    Biology Centre of the Upper Austrian Museum , J.-W.-Klein-Str. 73, 4040 Linz , Austria.
    Ahyong, Shane T
    Australian Museum, Sydney , NSW 2010 , Australia;School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales , Kensington, NSW 2052 , Australia.
    Ballerio, Alberto
    Viale Venezia 45 , I-25123 Brescia , Italy.
    Bouchard, Patrice
    Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa , Ontario, K1A 0C6 , Canada.
    Bourgoin, Thierry
    Institut Systématique, Evolution, Biodiversité (ISYEB), MNHN-CNRS-Sorbonne Université-EPHE-Université des Antilles, Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle , Paris 75005 , France.
    Dmitriev, Dmitry
    Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign , IL 61820 , USA.
    Evenhuis, Neal
    Department of Natural Sciences, Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu , HI 96817-2704 , USA.
    Grygier, Mark J
    National Museum of Marine Biology & Aquarium , Checheng, Pingtung 944401 , Taiwan.
    Harvey, Mark S
    Department of Terrestrial Zoology, Western Australian Museum , Welshpool DC, WA 6986 , Australia.
    Kottelat, Maurice
    Rue des Rauraques 6 , CH-2800 Delémont , Switzerland.
    Kluge, Nikita
    Department of Entomology, Saint-Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg , 199034 , Russia.
    Krell, Frank-T
    Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver , CO 80205-5798 , USA.
    Kojima, Jun-Ichi
    Natural History Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito , Ibaraki 310-8512 , Japan.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. FishBase.
    Lucinda, Paulo
    Laboratório de Ictiologia Sistemática, Universidade Federal do Tocantins , Tocantins, 77.500-000 , Brazil.
    Lyal, Christopher H C
    Department of Life Sciences, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD , UK.
    Pyle, Richard L
    Department of Natural Sciences, Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu , HI 96817-2704 , USA.
    Rheindt, Frank E
    National University of Singapore, Department of Biological Sciences , 16 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117558 , Singapore.
    Luisa Scioscia, Cristina
    Arachnology Division , Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales ‘Bernardino Rivadavia’, Buenos Aires , Argentina.
    Welter-Schultes, Francisco
    Abteilung Evolution und Biodiversität der Tiere und Zoologisches Museum, Universität Göttingen , Germany.
    Whitmore, Daniel
    Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart , D-70191 Stuttgart , Germany.
    Yanega, Douglas
    Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside , Riverside, CA 92521-0314 , USA.
    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang
    Landcare Research , Auckland 1072 , New Zealand;School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland , Auckland 1072 , New Zealand.
    Zhou, Hong-Zhang
    Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 , People’s Republic of China.
    Pape, Thomas
    Zoological Museum, Natural History Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen , DK-2100 , Denmark.
    Renaming taxa on ethical grounds threatens nomenclatural stability and scientific communication2023In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 197, no 2, p. 283-286Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 93. Chapman, Abbie S.A.
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bates, Amanda E.
    sFDvent: A global trait database for deep‐sea hydrothermal‐vent fauna2019In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 1538-1551Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Cheng, Yalin
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;;College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;.
    Miller, Matthew J.
    Conservation Genetics Division, Reneco International Wildlife Consultants LLC, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates;;University of Alaska Museum, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775;.
    Zhang, Dezhi
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;.
    Xiong, Ying
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;;College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;.
    Hao, Yan
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;;College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;.
    Jia, Chenxi
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;.
    Cai, Tianlong
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;;College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;.
    Li, Shou-Hsien
    Department of Life Sciences, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan, China;.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Liu, Yang
    State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Department of Ecology/School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China;.
    Chang, Yongbin
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;;College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;.
    Song, Gang
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;.
    Lei, Fumin
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China;;College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;;Center for Excellence in Animal Evolution and Genetics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650201, China.
    Parallel genomic responses to historical climate change and high elevation in East Asian songbirds2021In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 118, no 50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 95. Chiarle, Alberto
    et al.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Isaia, Marco
    Courtship behavior in European species of the genus Pardosa (Araneae, Lycosidae)2013In: Journal of Arachnology, ISSN 0161-8202, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 108-125Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 96. Conand, Chantal
    et al.
    Mulochau, Thierry
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Eléaume, Marc
    Chabanet, Pascale
    Inventory of echinoderms in the Iles Eparses (Europa, Glorieuses, Juan de Nova), Mozambique Channel, France2016In: Acta Oecologica, ISSN 1146-609X, E-ISSN 1873-6238, Vol. 72, p. 53-61-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 97. Conand, Chantal
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Eléaume, Marc
    Magalon, H.
    Chabanet, Pascale
    The Echinoderm fauna of Europa, Eparses Island, (Scattered Islands) in the Mozambique channel (South Western Indian Ocean)2013In: Cahiers de Biologie Marine, Vol. 54, p. 499-504Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 98. Costello, Mark J.
    et al.
    Bouchet, Philippe
    Boxshall, Geoff
    Fauchald, Kristian
    Gordon, Dennis
    Hoeksema, Bert W.
    Poore, Gary C. B.
    van Soest, Rob W. M.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Walter, T. Chad
    Vanhoorne, Bart
    Decock, Wim
    Appeltans, Ward
    Global Coordination and Standardisation in Marine Biodiversity through the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) and Related Databases2013In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 1, p. e51629-e51629Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99. Coulson, S.J.
    et al.
    Convey, P.
    Aakra, K.
    Aarvik, L.
    Ávila-Jiménez, M.L.
    Babenko, A.
    Biersma, E.M.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Brittain, J.E.
    Carlsson, A.M.
    Christoffersen, K.
    De Smet, W.H.
    Ekrem, T.
    Fjellberg, A.
    Füreder, L.
    Gustafsson, D.
    Gwiazdowicz, D.J.
    Hansen, L.O.
    Holmstrup, M.
    Hullé, M.
    Kaczmarek, L.
    Kolicka, M.
    Kuklin, V.
    Lakka, H.-K.
    Lebedeva, N.
    Makarova, O.
    Maraldo, K.
    Melekhina, E.
    Ödegaard, F.
    Pilskog, H.E.
    Simon, J.C.
    Sohlenius, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Solhöy, T.
    Söli, G.
    Stur, E.
    Tanasevitch, A.
    Taskareva, A.
    Velle, G.
    Zawierucha, K.
    Zmudczynska-Skarbek, K.
    The terrestrial and freshwater invertebrate biodiversity of the archipelagoes of the Barents Sea; Svalbard, Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya2014In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 68, p. 440-470Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 100. Curini Galletti, Marco
    et al.
    Artois, Tom
    Di Domenico, Maikon
    Fontaneto, Diego
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jörger, Katharina
    Leasi, Francesca
    Martinez, Alejandro
    Norenburg, Jon
    Sterrer, Wolfgang
    Todaro, Antonio
    Contribution of soft-bodied meiofaunal taxa to Italian marine biodiversity2020In: The European Zoological Journal, ISSN 2475-0263, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 369-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meiofauna includes an astonishing diversity of organisms, whose census is far from being complete. Most classic ecological studies have focused on hard-bodied Ecdysozoan taxa (notably Copepoda and Nematoda), whose cuticle allows determination at species-level after fixation, rather than soft-bodied, Spiralian taxa, which most often lose any diagnostic feature in fixed samples. Yet, metabarcoding studies have recently revealed a species-richness of soft-bodied taxa comparable, and in cases superior, to that of Copepoda and Nematoda together. However, given objective difficulties inherent to their study, which necessarily has to be performed on living individuals, and their limited utilisation for ecological and applicative research, taxonomic expertise on soft-bodied organisms has declined over the years, and diversity of these phyla in most areas of the world is presently completely unknown. Here we present an expert-based survey of current knowledge on the composition and distribution of soft-bodied meiofaunal taxa in Italy, with special references to the predominantly or exclusively meiobenthic phyla Gastrotricha, Gnathostomulida, Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Xenacoelomorpha, and macrofaunal taxa with conspicuous meiofaunal representatives (Annelida, Mollusca and Nemertea). A total of 638 described species have been reported from Italian coasts; furthermore, the existence of a large number of undescribed species is mentioned. Knowledge of Annelida, Gastrotricha, and Rotifera appears particularly detailed, placing Italy among the best-known country worldwide. In contrast, knowledge of Platyhelminthes and Xenacoelomorpha appears patchy, and limited to few areas. Sampling effort has been uneven, with most species recorded from the Tyrrhenian Sea, while large sections of the Adriatic and Ionian seas have been poorly explored. Results highlight the role that Marine Biological Stations, notably the Zoological Station “Anton Dohrn” in Naples, have had in promoting the study of soft-bodied taxa in Italy.

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