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  • 1.
    Hagman, Karl
    et al.
    Section for Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Science, Uppsala University.
    Barboutis, Christos
    Natural History Museum of Crete, University of Crete, Iraklion, Greece.
    Ehrenborg, Christian
    Section for Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Science, Uppsala University.
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Jaenson, Thomas G. T.
    Department of Systematic Biology, Medical Entomology Unit, Uppsala University.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Microbiology, Linköping University.
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Department of Medical Microbiology and Biochemistry, Uppsala University and Swedish Institute for Communicable Diseases and Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Microbiology, Linköping University.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Center for Ecology and Evolution, Microbial Model Systems, Linneaus University.
    Salaneck, Erik
    Section for Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Science, Uppsala University.
    On the potential roles of ticks and migrating birds in the ecology of West Nile virus.2014In: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, E-ISSN 2000-8686, Vol. 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Hoffman, Tove
    et al.
    Carra, Laura G.
    Öhagen, Patrik
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Barboutis, Christos
    Piacentini, Dario
    Figuerola, Jordi
    Kiat, Yosef
    Onrubia, Alejandro
    Jaenson, Thomas G.T.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Olsen, Björn
    Association between guilds of birds in the African-Western Palaearctic region and the tick species Hyalomma rufipes, one of the main vectors of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus2021In: One Health, ISSN 2352-7714, Vol. 13, p. 100349-100349, article id 100349Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Hoffman, Tove
    et al.
    Lindeborg, Mats
    Barboutis, Christos
    Erciyas-Yavuz, Kiraz
    Evander, Magnus
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Figuerola, Jordi
    Jaenson, Thomas G.T.
    Kiat, Yosef
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Mohamed, Nahla
    Moutailler, Sara
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Olsen, Björn
    Salanek, Erik
    Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever Virus RNA in Hyalomma rufipes Infesting Migratory Birds, Europe and Asia Minor.2018In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 24, p. 879-882Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Hoffman, Tove
    et al.
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Öhrman, Caroline
    Karlsson, Linda
    McDonough, Ryelan Francis
    Sahl, Jason W.
    Birdsell, Dawn
    Wagner, David M.
    Carra, Laura G.
    Wilhelmsson, Peter
    Pettersson, John H.-O.
    Barboutis, Christos
    Figuerola, Jordi
    Onrubia, Alejandro
    Kiat, Yosef
    Piacentini, Dario
    Jaenson, Thomas G. T.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Moutailler, Sara
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Forsman, Mats
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Olsen, Björn
    Association between guilds of birds in the African-Western Palaearctic region and the tick species Hyalomma rufipes, one of the main vectors of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.2022In: Microorganisms, E-ISSN 2076-2607, Vol. 10, article id 1393Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Härkönen, Tero
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Ahola, Markus
    Natural Resources Institute, Finland.
    André, Carl
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Bonsdorff, Erik
    Åbo Akademi.
    Eriksson, Susanne
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Hårding, Karin
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Johannesson, Kerstin
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Jonsson, Per
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Rödström, Eva Marie
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Tedengren, Mikael
    Stockholms universitet.
    Kunnasranta, Mervi
    Östra Finlands universitet, Joensuu.
    Ekosystemet vid Pyhäjoki är sårbart2015In: Hufvudstadsbladet, article id 31 juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 6.
    Li, Zhong-Min
    et al.
    Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State Plaza, Albany, New York 12237, United States.
    Roos, Anna Maria
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental Monitoring and Research. Department of Environmental Monitoring and Research, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm SE-10405, Sweden.
    Serfass, Thomas L.
    Department of Biology and Natural Resources, Frostburg State University, Frostburg, Maryland 21532, United States.
    Lee, Conner
    Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State Plaza, Albany, New York 12237, United States.
    Kannan, Kurunthachalam
    Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State Plaza, Albany, New York 12237, United States.
    Concentrations of 45 Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances in North American River Otters (Lontra canadensis) from West Virginia, USA2024In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 2089-2101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) aretop predators in riverine ecosystems and are vulnerable to per- andpolyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) exposure. Little is known aboutthe magnitude of exposure and tissue distribution of PFAS in riverotters. We measured 45 PFAS in various tissues of 42 river otterscollected from several watersheds in the state of West Virginia,USA. The median concentrations of ΣAll (sum concentration of45 PFAS) varied among tissues in the following decreasing order:liver (931 ng/g wet weight) > bile > pancreas > lung > kidney >blood > brain > muscle. Perfluoroalkylsulfonates (PFSAs) were thepredominant compounds accounting for 58−75% of the totalconcentrations, followed by perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs;21−35%). 8:2 fluorotelomer sulfonate (8:2 FTS), 10:2 FTS, and 6:2 chlorinated polyfluoroalkyl ether sulfonate were frequentlyfound in the liver (50−90%) and bile (96−100%), whereas hexafluoropropylene oxide dimer acid (HFPO-DA) was rarely found.The hepatic concentrations of ΣAll in river otters collected downstream of a fluoropolymer production facility located along theOhio River were 2-fold higher than those in other watersheds. The median whole body burden of ΣAll was calculated to be 1580μg. PFOS and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) concentrations in whole blood of some river otters exceeded the human toxicityreference values, which warrant further studies.

  • 7. Lindqvist, Magnus
    et al.
    Leth-Møller, Katja Biering
    Linneberg, Allan
    Kull, Inger
    Bergström, Anna
    Georgellis, Antonios
    Borres, Magnus P
    Ekebom, Agneta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    van Hage, Marianne
    Melén, Erik
    Westman, Marit
    Natural course of pollen-induced allergic rhinitis from childhood to adulthood: A 20-year follow up.2023In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Allergic rhinitis (AR) is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide. There are limited prospective long-term data regarding persistency and remission of AR. The objective of this study was to investigate the natural course of pollen-induced AR (pollen-AR) over 20 years, from childhood into early adulthood.

    METHODS: Data from 1137 subjects in the Barn/Children Allergi/Allergy Milieu Stockholm Epidemiologic birth cohort (BAMSE) with a completed questionnaire regarding symptoms, asthma, treatment with allergen immunotherapy (AIT) and results of allergen-specific IgE for inhalant allergens at 4, 8, 16 and 24 years were analyzed. Pollen-AR was defined as sneezing, runny, itchy or blocked nose; and itchy or watery eyes when exposed to birch and/or grass pollen in combination with allergen-specific IgE ≥0.35kUA /L to birch and/or grass.

    RESULTS: Approximately 75% of children with pollen-AR at 4 or 8 years had persistent disease up to 24 years, and 30% developed asthma. The probability of persistency was high already at low levels of pollen-specific IgE. The highest rate of remission from pollen-AR was seen between 16 and 24 years (21.5%); however, the majority remained sensitized. This period was also when pollen-specific IgE-levels stopped increasing and the average estimated annual incidence of pollen-AR decreased from 1.5% to 0.8% per year.

    CONCLUSION: Children with pollen-AR are at high risk of persistent disease for at least 20 years. Childhood up to adolescence seems to be the most dynamic period of AR progression. Our findings underline the close cross-sectional and longitudinal relationship between sensitization, AR and asthma.

  • 8. Lõhmus, Mare
    et al.
    Lind, Tomas
    MacLachlan, Laura
    Ekebom, Agneta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring. Museum of Natural History.
    Gedda, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Östensson, Pia
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Georgelis, Antonios
    Combined Exposure to Birch Pollen and Thunderstorms Affects Respiratory Health in Stockholm, Sweden—A Time Series Analysis2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 5852-5852Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Olstrup, Henrik
    et al.
    Atmospheric Science Unit, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, 11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johansson, Christer
    Atmospheric Science Unit, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, 11418 Stockholm, Sweden. Environment and Health Administration, SLB, Box 8136, 104 20 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin..
    Tornevi, Andreas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin..
    Ekebom, Agneta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Meister, Kadri
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Statistik..
    A Multi-Pollutant Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) Based on Short-Term Respiratory Effects in Stockholm, Sweden2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, ISSN 1661-7827, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, an Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) for Stockholm is introduced as a tool to capture the combined effects associated with multi-pollutant exposure. Public information regarding the expected health risks associated with current or forecasted concentrations of pollutants and pollen can be very useful for sensitive persons when planning their outdoor activities. For interventions, it can also be important to know the contribution from pollen and the specific air pollutants, judged to cause the risk. The AQHI is based on an epidemiological analysis of asthma emergency department visits (AEDV) and urban background concentrations of NOx, O₃, PM10 and birch pollen in Stockholm during 2001⁻2005. This analysis showed per 10 µg·m⁻3 increase in the mean of same day and yesterday an increase in AEDV of 0.5% (95% CI: -1.2⁻2.2), 0.3% (95% CI: -1.4⁻2.0) and 2.5% (95% CI: 0.3⁻4.8) for NOx, O₃ and PM10, respectively. For birch pollen, the AEDV increased with 0.26% (95% CI: 0.18⁻0.34) for 10 pollen grains·m⁻3. In comparison with the coefficients in a meta-analysis, the mean values of the coefficients obtained in Stockholm are smaller. The mean value of the risk increase associated with PM10 is somewhat smaller than the mean value of the meta-coefficient, while for O₃, it is less than one fifth of the meta-coefficient. We have not found any meta-coefficient using NOx as an indicator of AEDV, but compared to the mean value associated with NO₂, our value of NOx is less than half as large. The AQHI is expressed as the predicted percentage increase in AEDV without any threshold level. When comparing the relative contribution of each pollutant to the total AQHI, based on monthly averages concentrations during the period 2015⁻2017, there is a tangible pattern. The AQHI increase associated with NOx exhibits a relatively even distribution throughout the year, but with a clear decrease during the summer months due to less traffic. O₃ contributes to an increase in AQHI during the spring. For PM10, there is a significant increase during early spring associated with increased suspension of road dust. For birch pollen, there is a remarkable peak during the late spring and early summer during the flowering period. Based on monthly averages, the total AQHI during 2015⁻2017 varies between 4 and 9%, but with a peak value of almost 16% during the birch pollen season in the spring 2016. Based on daily mean values, the most important risk contribution during the study period is from PM10 with 3.1%, followed by O₃ with 2.0%.

  • 10.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Fång, Johan
    Mätningar av läkemedelsrester i blod och urin från utter2017Report (Other academic)
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  • 11.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Ågren, Erik
    Statens Veterinärmedicinska Anstalt.
    Tumlare 2017 Hälsostatus och dödsorsaker hos insamlade djur2018Report (Other academic)
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  • 12.
    Roos, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Loso, Katarina
    Fång, Johan
    Mätningar av läkemedelsrester i blod och urin från utter2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport är den första delen av två i en pilotstudie om läkemedelsrester i utter. I den första delen ville vi undersöka om det gick att analysera rester av läkemedel i urin och blod från utter, samt att utvärdera vilken matris som är mest lämplig för ändamålet.    Vi har analyserat 30 olika läkemedelsrester i blod och urin från 20 poolade prover som innehöll blod respektive urin från 33 uttrar. Samtliga läkemedel fanns i blod och/eller urinprover, dock inte i alla prov. Ett flertal ämnen låg under kvantificerbar nivå (<LOQ). Det innebär att man kan se att de finns i provet men pga ”brus” inte kan kvantificera det.  Det antidepressiva medlet Venlafaxin fanns i samtliga tio blodprover (0,24-2,0 ng/g färskvikt) men inte alls i urinproverna. Risperidone som används vid behandling av bl.a. schitzofreni fanns i mätbara halter i 7 av de 10 blodproven (4,3-250 ng/g färskvikt) och 7 av 10 urinprov (0,12-46 ng/g färskvikt).   Högst antal läkemedelsrester i urinet hade en utter från Västervik (11 st + 4 st <LOQ). Den hade också mätbara halter från 7 olika läkemedelsrester i blodet (+ 4 st <LOQ).  Det fanns fler mätbara läkemedel i urinproverna jämfört med blodproverna, med ett undantag (Venlafaxin). Dessvärre är urin begränsande, de flesta uttrar som inkommer till museet har tom eller nästan tom urinblåsa. Att blodprov ändå fungerar bra är positivt. Det är oftast möjligt att ta blod från uttrarna som skickas in och därför föreslår vi att man i fortsättningen analyserar blod, och urin bara i de fall där det är möjligt.   

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  • 13.
    Roos, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring. Uppsala University.
    Rigét, Frank
    National Environment Research Institute, University of Aarhus, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark.
    Örberg, Jan
    Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, SE-75236 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bone mineral density in Swedish otters (Lutra lutra) in relation to PCB and DDE concentrations2010In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 73, p. 1063-1070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to elucidate if DDE (dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene) or PCB(polybrominated biphenyls), are responsible for the pathological alterations observed in Swedish otter bone tissues. Femurs from 86 male otters collected between 1832 and 2004 were measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography(pQCT). Some otters had very high and others fairly low concentrations of OCs (ranging between 1.4–970 mg sPCB/kg l.w. and 0.0–24 mg DDE/kg l.w.in muscle tissue). Positive relationships were found between three of the four cortical bone variables analysed (area, content and thickness) and sPCB concentration, while no significant relationships with DDE concentration were found. None of the trabecular variables were significantly related to PCB or DDE concentration. Three of the four trabecular bone variables showed decreasing values in the beginning and increasing values at the end of period 1974–2004. No temporal trends were found for cortical bone variables. OC concentrations decreased between 1974 and 2004.

  • 14.
    Roos, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Stavenow, Jasmine
    Statens Veterinärmedicinska Anstalt.
    Ågren, Erik
    Statens Veterinärmedicinska Anstalt.
    Neimanis, Aleksija
    Statens Veterinärmedicinska Anstalt.
    Nya pusselbitar i tumlarens hemliga liv2020In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 115, no 2, p. 36-40Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 15.
    Roos, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Ågren, Erik
    Statens Veterinärmedicinska Anstalt.
    High Prevalence of Proposed Müllerian Duct RemnantCysts on the Spermatic Duct in Wild Eurasian Otters (Lutra lutra) from Sweden2013In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spermatic ducts (vasa deferentia) of 235 otters (Lutra lutra) found dead between 1999 and 2012 in Sweden were examined for presence of paraductular cysts. Single or multiple elongated uni- or bilateral cysts parallel to the spermatic duct were noted in 72% of the examined males. The cysts were adjacent to, but did not communicate with the lumen of the spermatic duct, and were usually located within a few centimeters of the testis and epididymis. The cysts are proposed to be congenital Müllerian duct remnants. Other morphologic abnormalities in the reproductive organs were not noted within this study. Possible causes of the incomplete regression of the embryonic female gonadal duct are exposure to environmental contaminants such as elevated concentrations of estrogen-like compounds (endocrine disrupting chemicals), inbreeding, or a naturally occurring anatomic defect. No obvious geographical pattern was observed for otters with or without cysts. This is the first study and description of cysts on the spermatic duct in otters.

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  • 16. Schober, Anna
    et al.
    Tizek, Linda
    Johansson, Emma K.
    Ekebom, Agneta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring. Museum of Natural History.
    Wallin, Jan-Erik
    Buters, Jeroen
    Schneider, Simon
    Zink, Alexander
    Monitoring disease activity of pollen allergies: What crowdsourced data are telling us2022In: World Allergy Organization Journal, E-ISSN 1939-4551, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 100718-100718, article id 100718Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Schultes, Lara
    et al.
    Noordenburg, Noordenburg van
    Spaan, Kyra M.
    Plassmann, Merle M.
    Simon, Malene
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Benskin, Jonathan P.
    High Concentrations of Unidentified Extractable Organofluorine Observed in Blubber from a Greenland Killer Whale (Orcinus orca)2020In: Environmental Science and Technology Letters, E-ISSN 2328-8930, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 905-915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is generally accepted that per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) occur primarily in protein-rich tissues such as blood and liver, but few studies have examined the occurrence of legacy and novel PFASs in lipid-rich tissues such as blubber. Here we report the distribution of 24 PFASs, total fluorine, and extractable organic fluorine (EOF) in eight different tissues of a killer whale (Orcinus orca) from East Greenland. The sum of target PFAS concentrations was highest in liver (352 ng/g of wet weight) and decreased in the following order: blood > kidney ≈ lung ≈ ovary > skin ≈ muscle ≈ blubber. Most of the EOF consisted of known PFASs in all tissues except blubber, which displayed the highest concentration of EOF, almost none of which was attributed to targeted PFASs. Suspect screening using high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed the presence of additional PFASs but is unlikely to explain the high concentrations of EOF in blubber. While the identity of this unknown organofluorine and its pervasiveness in marine mammals require further investigation, this work suggests that exposure of killer whales to organofluorine substances may be underestimated by determination of legacy PFASs exclusively in liver or blood.

  • 18. Sitaru, Sebastian
    et al.
    Tizek, Linda
    Buters, Jeroen
    Ekebom, Agneta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Wallin, Jan-Erik
    Zink, Alexander
    Assessing the national burden of allergic asthma by web-search data, pollen counts, and drug prescriptions in Germany and Sweden2023In: World Allergy Organization Journal, E-ISSN 1939-4551, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 100752-100752, article id 100752Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 19. Sonne, Christian
    et al.
    Siebert, Ursula
    Gonnsen, Katharina
    Desforges, Jean-Pierre
    Eulaers, Igor
    Persson, Sara
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Bäcklin, Britt-Marie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Kauhala, Kaarina
    Tange Olsen, Morten
    Harding, Karin C.
    Treu, Gabriele
    Galatius, Anders
    Andersen-Ranberg, Emelie
    Grpss, Stephanie
    Lakemeyer, Jan
    Lehnert, Kristina
    Shiung Lam, Su
    Peng, Wanxi
    Dietz, Rune
    Health effects from contaminant exposure in Baltic Sea birds and marinemammals: A review2020In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 139, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 20.
    Wallménius, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Clinical Microbiology, Uppsala University.
    Barboutis, Christos
    Natural History Museum of Crete, University of Crete, Iraklion, Greece.
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Jaenson, Thomas GT
    Medical Entomology Unit, Department of Organismal Biology, Uppsala University.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University.
    Olsen, Björn
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Infectious Diseases, Uppsala University.
    Salanek, Erik
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Infectious Diseases, Uppsala University.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Clinical Microbiology, Uppsala University.
    Spotted fever Rickettsia species in Hyalomma and Ixodes ticks infesting migratory birds in the European Mediterranean area2014In: Parasites & Vectors, E-ISSN 1756-3305, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Zohari, Siamak
    et al.
    Neimanis, Aleksija
    Härkönen, Tero
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Moraeus, Charlotta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Valarcher, Jean-Francois
    Avian influenza A(H10N7) virus involvement in mass mortality of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) in Sweden, March through October 20142014In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 19, no 46, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We provide the first scientific report of influenza A virus involvement in a mass mortality event among harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) off the west coast of Sweden. Avian influenza A (H10N7) virus was detected in the lungs of two affected animals. This subtype has not been reported in seals to date, nor has influenza A-associated mortality been reported in seals in Europe. Circulation of avian influenza viruses in mammals may have implications for public health.

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